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Raywat Deonandan

Bio: Raywat Deonandan is an academic researcher from RMIT University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Public health & Health care. The author has an hindex of 12, co-authored 73 publications receiving 493 citations. Previous affiliations of Raywat Deonandan include Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario & University of Ottawa.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Eight challenges of seeking by clients in high income nations of surrogate mothers in low income nations, particularly India, presents a set of largely unexamined ethical challenges to spur discussion and eventual policy development towards protecting the rights and health of vulnerable women of the Global South.
Abstract: Reproductive medical tourism is by some accounts a multibillion dollar industry globally. The seeking by clients in high income nations of surrogate mothers in low income nations, particularly India, presents a set of largely unexamined ethical challenges. In this paper, eight such challenges are elucidated to spur discussion and eventual policy development towards protecting the rights and health of vulnerable women of the Global South.

88 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Seven methods of estimating socio-economic status (SES) were compared, including four based on data specific to individuals (Blishen, Pineo-Porter, British Registrar General, Hollingshead) and three based on the average characteristics of the postal code area in which people live (income alone, education alone, income and education combined).
Abstract: Seven methods of estimating socio-economic status (SES) were compared, including four based on data specific to individuals (Blishen, Pineo-Porter, British Registrar General, Hollingshead) and three based on the average characteristics of the postal code area in which people live (income alone, education alone, income and education combined). Data from the files of 151 patients undergoing in vitro fertilization were used. The four individual scales were highly correlated among themselves (Spearman's correlation coefficient between 0.6 and 0.9) but only moderately correlated with the measures based on postal code (Spearman's correlation coefficient between 0.2 and 0.3).

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Raywat Deonandan1
TL;DR: One of the fastest-growing categories of cross-border reproductive care is international surrogacy, the act of infertile clients traveling internationally to engage the paid services of foreign surrogates to carry their babies to term.
Abstract: Reproductive tourism, or "cross-border reproductive care", is the phenomenon of people crossing international borders to access reproductive technologies. One of the fastest-growing categories of cross-border reproductive care is international surrogacy, the act of infertile clients traveling internationally to engage the paid services of foreign surrogates to carry their babies to term. It is a multibillion-dollar global industry presenting unique legal, ethical, and risk-management challenges. Clients tend to be price-sensitive, middle-income individuals seeking services from surrogates who in the global market are thought to be of quite low socioeconomic status. Risks are experienced by all parties involved in the transaction, including the client's countries of origin and destination. The risks to the surrogate evolve from the potential to exploit her economic vulnerability in order to encourage both consent and unfair pricing. Opportunities for policy development are explored.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Apr 2020-Autism
TL;DR: While there are continuous reports of differences in gut microbiota between autism spectrum disorder and neurotypical individuals, knowledge about the consistency in the presence and abundance of bacterial species, as well as metabolites, remains deficient, and further research with rigorous methodologies is required.
Abstract: Gut dysfunction and microbial dysbiosis comorbidities are of particular interest in recent autism research, as gastrointestinal distress is present in up to 90% of autism spectrum disorder cases an...

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The literature assessing GWG discussions between patients and their HCPs in a clinical setting is summarized to better understand the knowledge that is currently being exchanged and healthcare providers should counsel their pregnant patients on GWG with advice that is concordant with the Institute of Medicine Guidelines.
Abstract: Importance Gestational weight gain (GWG) is an independent and modifiable factor for a healthy pregnancy. Gestational weight gain above or below the Institute of Medicine Guidelines has been shown to impact both maternal and fetal health (eg, gestational diabetes, hypertension, downstream obesity). Healthcare providers (HCPs) have the potential to be reliable sources of evidence-based weight information and advice during pregnancy. Objective The aim of this study was to summarize the literature assessing GWG discussions between patients and their HCPs in a clinical setting to better understand the knowledge that is currently being exchanged. Evidence Acquisition A literature review was conducted by searching Ovid Medline, CINAHL, and Embase databases. All relevant primary research articles in English that assessed GWG discussions were included, whereas intervention studies were excluded. Results A total of 54 articles were included in this review. Although the overall prevalence and content of GWG counseling varied between studies, counseling was often infrequent and inaccurate. Healthcare providers tended to focus more on women experiencing obesity and excessive GWG, as opposed to the other body mass index categories or inadequate GWG. Women of higher socioeconomic status, older age, nulliparous, history of dieting, low physical activity, and those categorized as overweight/obese were more likely to receive GWG advice. Patients also reported receiving conflicting facts between different HCP disciplines. Conclusions The evidence regarding GWG counseling in prenatal care remains variable, with discrepancies between geographic regions, patient populations, and HCP disciplines. Relevance Healthcare providers should counsel their pregnant patients on GWG with advice that is concordant with the Institute of Medicine Guidelines.

27 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
13 Apr 2013

1,145 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition, categorized three stages of drug addictions preoccupation, anticipation, binge intoxication and withdrawal or negative effect.
Abstract: Drug addiction is a pathological state; the disorder involves the progression of acute drug use to the development of drug seeking behavior. The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition, categorized three stages of drug addictions preoccupation, anticipation, binge intoxication and withdrawal or negative effect. These stages are characterized respectively by constant craving and preoccupation with obtaining the substance, using more of the substance and experience the necessary intoxicating effects and experiencing tolerance withdrawal symptoms and decrease motivation of normal life activities.

757 citations

Journal Article

488 citations

01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: Catechism of the Catholic Church Sexual Identity (No. 2333) as mentioned in this paper states: "Men and women should acknowledge and accept their sexual identity, and should be encouraged to be themselves, regardless of their sexual orientation."
Abstract: Catechism of the Catholic Church Sexual Identity (No. 2333) “Everyone, man and woman, should acknowledge and accept his sexual identity. Physical, moral, and spiritual difference and complementarity are oriented toward the goods of marriage and the flourishing of family life. The harmony of the couple and of society depends in part on the way in which the complementarity, needs, and mutual support between the sexes are lived out.”

442 citations