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Rebeccah Marie Dawson

Bio: Rebeccah Marie Dawson is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: German literature. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 42 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
Shohei Sato1
TL;DR: In this paper, Murray and Hay succeed as contributors, their individual chapters showing a dedication to explanation that is to be admired, and their scholarly experience is evident, but their role as editors must come under scrutiny, both in commissioning the chapter on soccer fanzines is puzzling in its aim, and careless in its use of language and referencing and in editorial aggressiveness, failing to achieve an equilibrium of content across the book.
Abstract: this when it relates to a separate tour from four years earlier isn’t clear. By and large, Murray and Hay succeed as contributors, their individual chapters showing a dedication to explanation that is to be admired, and their scholarly experience is evident. However, their role as editors must come under scrutiny, both in commissioning the chapter on soccer fanzines is puzzling in its aim, and careless in its use of language and referencing and in editorial aggressiveness, failing to achieve an equilibrium of content across the book. Nevertheless, those who follow their path will be grateful for the groundwork that has been laid in an area where source material is as barren as the outback.

110 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
20 Mar 1984-Telos
TL;DR: The authors consider the artistic and literary doctrine of "socialist realism" as an intellectual disaster and propose a new approach to the question of what art in general, and literature in particular, should say, and how it should say it.
Abstract: There is no serious work of which I am aware that does not consider the artistic and literary doctrine of “socialist realism” an intellectual disaster. When Zhdanov announced this doctrine as official Soviet policy at the First Congress of Soviet Writers in 1934, his words put an end to a variety of artistic experiments which had taken place within the context of the Russian and European Left during the previous two decades. Suddenly socialist realism, or Zhdanovism, became the only “correct” Marxist approach to the question of what art in general, and literature in particular, should say, and how it should say it.

42 citations