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Réka Albert

Researcher at Pennsylvania State University

Publications -  204
Citations -  99115

Réka Albert is an academic researcher from Pennsylvania State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Biological network & Complex network. The author has an hindex of 62, co-authored 197 publications receiving 91553 citations. Previous affiliations of Réka Albert include University of Notre Dame & Eötvös Loránd University.

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Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks

TL;DR: A model based on these two ingredients reproduces the observed stationary scale-free distributions, which indicates that the development of large networks is governed by robust self-organizing phenomena that go beyond the particulars of the individual systems.
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Statistical mechanics of complex networks

TL;DR: In this paper, a simple model based on the power-law degree distribution of real networks was proposed, which was able to reproduce the power law degree distribution in real networks and to capture the evolution of networks, not just their static topology.
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Error and attack tolerance of complex networks

TL;DR: It is found that scale-free networks, which include the World-Wide Web, the Internet, social networks and cells, display an unexpected degree of robustness, the ability of their nodes to communicate being unaffected even by unrealistically high failure rates.
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The large-scale organization of metabolic networks

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a systematic comparative mathematical analysis of the metabolic networks of 43 organisms representing all three domains of life, and show that despite significant variation in their individual constituents and pathways, these metabolic networks have the same topological scaling properties and show striking similarities to the inherent organization of complex non-biological systems.

The large-scale organization of metabolic networks

TL;DR: This analysis of metabolic networks of 43 organisms representing all three domains of life shows that, despite significant variation in their individual constituents and pathways, these metabolic networks have the same topological scaling properties and show striking similarities to the inherent organization of complex non-biological systems.