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Renato Turchetta

Bio: Renato Turchetta is an academic researcher from Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The author has contributed to research in topics: CMOS sensor & Pixel. The author has an hindex of 42, co-authored 244 publications receiving 10891 citations. Previous affiliations of Renato Turchetta include FEI Company & Centre national de la recherche scientifique.
Topics: CMOS sensor, Pixel, CMOS, Detector, Image sensor


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as mentioned in this paper was designed to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1)
Abstract: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1) (10(27)cm(-2)s(-1)). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4 pi solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudo-rapidity coverage to high values (vertical bar eta vertical bar <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

5,193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The DELPHI detector as discussed by the authors is a 4π detector with emphasis on particle identification, three-dimensional information, high granularity and precise vertex determination, which is used at the large electron positron collider (LEP) at CERN.
Abstract: DELPHI is a 4π detector with emphasis on particle identification, three-dimensional information, high granularity and precise vertex determination. The design criteria, the construction of the detector and the performance during the first year of operation at the large electron positron collider (LEP) at CERN are described.

419 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a novel active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed, which has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications.
Abstract: A novel Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking made in a standard CMOS technology is proposed. The sensor is a photodiode, which is readily available in a CMOS technology. The diode has a special structure, which allows the high detection efficiency required for tracking applications. The partially depleted thin epitaxial silicon layer is used as a sensitive detector volume. Semiconductor device simulation, using either ToSCA based or 3-D ISE-TCAD software packages shows that the charge collection is efficient, reasonably fast (order of 100 ns), and the charge spreading limited to a few pixels only. A first prototype has been designed, fabricated and tested. It is made of four arrays each containing 64×64 pixels, with a readout pitch of 20 μm in both directions. The device is fabricated using standard submicron 0.6 μm CMOS process, which features twin-tub implanted in a p-type epitaxial layer, a characteristic common to many modern CMOS VLSI processes. Extensive tests made with soft X-ray source ( 55 Fe) and minimum ionising particles (15 GeV/ c pions) fully demonstrate the predicted performances, with the individual pixel noise (ENC) below 20 electrons and the Signal-to-Noise ratio for both 5.9 keV X-rays and Minimum Ionising Particles (MIP) of the order of 30. This novel device opens new perspectives in high-precision vertex detectors in Particle Physics experiments, as well as in other application, like low-energy beta particle imaging, visible light single photon imaging (using the Hybrid Photon Detector approach) and high-precision slow neutron imaging.

395 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The APV25 as mentioned in this paper is a 128-channel analogue pipeline chip for the readout of silicon microstrip detectors in the CMS tracker at the LHC, each channel comprises a low noise amplifier, a 192-cell analogue pipeline and a deconvolution readout circuit.
Abstract: The APV25 is a 128-channel analogue pipeline chip for the readout of silicon microstrip detectors in the CMS tracker at the LHC. Each channel comprises a low noise amplifier, a 192-cell analogue pipeline and a deconvolution readout circuit. Output data are transmitted on a single differential current output via an analogue multiplexer. The chip is fabricated in a standard 0.25 μm CMOS process to take advantage of the radiation tolerance, lower noise and power, and high circuit density. Experimental characterisation of this circuit shows full functionality and good performance both in pre- and post-irradiation (20 Mrad) conditions. The measured noise is significantly reduced compared to earlier APV versions. A description of the design and results from measurements prior to irradiation are presented.

362 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Betty Abelev1, Jaroslav Adam2, Dagmar Adamová3, Madan M. Aggarwal4  +1065 moreInstitutions (103)
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed an ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di- electrons emitted by the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider).
Abstract: ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark–Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton–proton, proton–nucleus and nucleus–nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018–2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high- resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di- electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

252 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, results from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.8 standard deviations.

8,857 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN as mentioned in this paper was designed to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1)
Abstract: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1) (10(27)cm(-2)s(-1)). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4 pi solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudo-rapidity coverage to high values (vertical bar eta vertical bar <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

5,193 citations

Book
Georges Aad1, E. Abat2, Jalal Abdallah3, Jalal Abdallah4  +3029 moreInstitutions (164)
23 Feb 2020
TL;DR: The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper, where a brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.
Abstract: The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

3,111 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John Allison1, K. Amako2, John Apostolakis3, Pedro Arce4, Makoto Asai5, Tsukasa Aso6, Enrico Bagli, Alexander Bagulya7, Sw. Banerjee8, G. Barrand9, B. R. Beck10, Alexey Bogdanov11, D. Brandt, Jeremy M. C. Brown12, Helmut Burkhardt3, Ph Canal8, D. Cano-Ott4, Stephane Chauvie, Kyung-Suk Cho13, G.A.P. Cirrone14, Gene Cooperman15, M. A. Cortés-Giraldo16, G. Cosmo3, Giacomo Cuttone14, G.O. Depaola17, Laurent Desorgher, X. Dong15, Andrea Dotti5, Victor Daniel Elvira8, Gunter Folger3, Ziad Francis18, A. Galoyan19, L. Garnier9, M. Gayer3, K. Genser8, Vladimir Grichine3, Vladimir Grichine7, Susanna Guatelli20, Susanna Guatelli21, Paul Gueye22, P. Gumplinger23, Alexander Howard24, Ivana Hřivnáčová9, S. Hwang13, Sebastien Incerti25, Sebastien Incerti26, A. Ivanchenko3, Vladimir Ivanchenko3, F.W. Jones23, S. Y. Jun8, Pekka Kaitaniemi27, Nicolas A. Karakatsanis28, Nicolas A. Karakatsanis29, M. Karamitrosi30, M.H. Kelsey5, Akinori Kimura31, Tatsumi Koi5, Hisaya Kurashige32, A. Lechner3, S. B. Lee33, Francesco Longo34, M. Maire, Davide Mancusi, A. Mantero, E. Mendoza4, B. Morgan35, K. Murakami2, T. Nikitina3, Luciano Pandola14, P. Paprocki3, J Perl5, Ivan Petrović36, Maria Grazia Pia, W. Pokorski3, J. M. Quesada16, M. Raine, Maria A.M. Reis37, Alberto Ribon3, A. Ristic Fira36, Francesco Romano14, Giorgio Ivan Russo14, Giovanni Santin38, Takashi Sasaki2, D. Sawkey39, J. I. Shin33, Igor Strakovsky40, A. Taborda37, Satoshi Tanaka41, B. Tome, Toshiyuki Toshito, H.N. Tran42, Pete Truscott, L. Urbán, V. V. Uzhinsky19, Jerome Verbeke10, M. Verderi43, B. Wendt44, H. Wenzel8, D. H. Wright5, Douglas Wright10, T. Yamashita, J. Yarba8, H. Yoshida45 
TL;DR: Geant4 as discussed by the authors is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter, which is used by a large number of experiments and projects in a variety of application domains, including high energy physics, astrophysics and space science, medical physics and radiation protection.
Abstract: Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It is used by a large number of experiments and projects in a variety of application domains, including high energy physics, astrophysics and space science, medical physics and radiation protection. Over the past several years, major changes have been made to the toolkit in order to accommodate the needs of these user communities, and to efficiently exploit the growth of computing power made available by advances in technology. The adaptation of Geant4 to multithreading, advances in physics, detector modeling and visualization, extensions to the toolkit, including biasing and reverse Monte Carlo, and tools for physics and release validation are discussed here.

2,260 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the neutralino is considered as a superpartner in many supersymmetric theories, and the cosmological abundance of neutralino and the event rates for both direct and indirect detection schemes are discussed.
Abstract: There is almost universal agreement among astronomers that most of the mass in the Universe and most of the mass in the Galactic halo is dark. Many lines of reasoning suggest that the dark matter consists of some new, as yet undiscovered, weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). There is now a vast experimental effort being surmounted to detect WIMPS in the halo. The most promising techniques involve direct detection in low-background laboratory detectors and indirect detection through observation of energetic neutrinos from annihilation of WIMPs that have accumulated in the Sun and/or the Earth. Of the many WIMP candidates, perhaps the best motivated and certainly the most theoretically developed is the neutralino, the lightest superpartner in many supersymmetric theories. We review the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model and discuss prospects for detection of neutralino dark matter. We review in detail how to calculate the cosmological abundance of the neutralino and the event rates for both direct- and indirect-detection schemes, and we discuss astrophysical and laboratory constraints on supersymmetric models. We isolate and clarify the uncertainties from particle physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics that enter at each step in the calculation. We briefly review other related dark-matter candidates and detection techniques.

2,047 citations