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Richard Carter-White

Bio: Richard Carter-White is an academic researcher from Macquarie University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Holocaust studies & Human geography. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 13 publications receiving 57 citations. Previous affiliations of Richard Carter-White include University of Exeter & University of Tokyo.

Papers
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that the genre of testimony is predisposed towards generating disruptive encounters that force the reader of such works to take co-responsibility in making sense of the text.
Abstract: Following on from spectral geographical studies of the disruptive aspects of memory, this paper further develops recent interest in the nonrepresentational and paradoxical dynamics of witnessing by drawing out the possibility of a historiography based on the capacity of testimony to interrupt and suspend representational closure. This possibility is posited in relation to the specific historiographical challenges posed by places and events of atrocity, whereby the extreme nature that makes these events so real threatens at the same time to render them the product of a self-enclosed, alien and absolutely distant world. Through a close reading of Auschwitz survivor Primo Levi, I argue that the genre of testimony is predisposed towards generating disruptive encounters that force the reader of such works to take co-responsibility in making sense of the text. Focusing upon Levi’s famous distinction between ‘the drowned and the saved’ of the camp, and the multiple possible interpretations of this distinction, I further argue that by establishing a space of uncertainty in which audiences must make an interpretive decision about the text without authorial guarantee, the disruptive form of memory that characterises witness testimony has the capacity to cultivate a fleeting recognition of a shared world between witness and reader, past and present.

16 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors adopt Roberto Esposito's critique of the concept of community to problematize the assumption that camp communities necessarily constitute a space of empowerment and agency for camp residents.

14 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a strategy for exposing witness accounts to an uncompromising criteria of evidentiality and plausibility, designed to test their representational quality as a means of preempting negationist attempts to manipulate "faulty" accounts.
Abstract: Witness testimonies provide a singular challenge to historians of Auschwitz. Survivor accounts offer a privileged perspective on the world of the camp, yet as recent conceptual work has shown the performative structure of these texts exceeds and eludes this representational duty. The challenge for historians is that, given their privileged, ‘insider’ status, any equivocality regarding the content of witness testimonies provides space for Holocaust denial. This paper offers a critical reading of one historical strategy for meeting this challenge: Exposing witness accounts to an uncompromising criteria of evidentiality and plausibility, designed to test their representational quality as a means of preempting negationist attempts to manipulate ‘faulty’ accounts. Drawing on Lyotard, I argue that, even as this strategy succeeds in refuting individual cases of denial, by refusing to enter into dialogue with the language game of testimony, and, more importantly, by invalidating any attempt to do so, this strateg...

14 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a history of the Holocaust is developed based on the spatialities of organised resistance, through a geographical reading of two cinematic depictions of the 1943 prisoner uprising at Sobibor death camp.

11 citations

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TL;DR: reflecting on experiences at the Department of Geography and Planning at Macquarie University, a series of challenges, responses and opportunities for teaching core disciplinary skills and knowledge are explored across three COVID‐19 moments: transition, advocacy, and hybridity.
Abstract: Abstract COVID‐19 has radically changed the higher education sector in Australia and beyond. Restrictions on student movement (especially for international students) and on gatherings (which limited on‐campus sessions) saw universities transition to fully online teaching modes almost overnight. In this commentary, we reflect on this transition and consider the implications for teaching the disciplines of geography and planning. Reflecting on experiences at the Department of Geography and Planning at Macquarie University, we explore a series of challenges, responses and opportunities for teaching core disciplinary skills and knowledge across three COVID‐19 moments: transition, advocacy, and hybridity. Our focus is on the teaching of core disciplinary skills and knowledge and specifically on geographical theory, methods, and fieldwork and professional practice skills. In drawing on this case from Macquarie University, we offer insights for the future of teaching geography and planning in universities more broadly.

9 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: The concept of story draws attention to the relationship between personal experience and expression, and the broader contexts within which such experiences are ordered, performed, interpreted, and... as mentioned in this paper,.
Abstract: The concept of story draws attention to the relationship between personal experience and expression, and the broader contexts within which such experiences are ordered, performed, interpreted, and ...

212 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an approach towards a Politicized Intervention in creativity and geography, which they call Creativity and Geography: Toward A Politicised Intervention.
Abstract: (2013). Creativity and Geography: Toward A Politicized Intervention. Geographical Review: Vol. 103, No. 2, pp. iii-xxvi.

103 citations

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TL;DR: The concept of ontological security has been taken up in human geography primarily through Giddens' (1990, 1991) formulation, but the idea has its origins in the writings of the existential psychoanalyst RD Laing as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The concept of ontological security has been taken up in human geography primarily through Giddens' (1990, 1991) formulation, but the idea has its origins in the writings of the existential psychoanalyst RD Laing Returning to the psychoanalytic underpinnings of the concept, I use autobiographical vignettes to evoke and explore what it means to feel insecure Using psychoanalytically informed illustrations of melancholia, ordinary acute anxiety and unconscious splitting, I develop a personal, subjective emotional geography of insecurity, and I caution against confusing certainty with ontological security

69 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify and address a significant weakness in the literature on mobility and power, and specifically, the consideration of mobility as an expression of power, arguing that future research in mobilities must consider more fully the disciplinary nature of mobility and suggest that the concept of "disciplined mobility" may form a framework for such future research.
Abstract: This paper identifies and addresses a significant weakness in the literature on mobility – the theorisation of mobility and power, and specifically, the consideration of mobility as an expression of power. It argues that the ‘mobilities turn’ has tended to draw a connection between mobility, autonomy and freedom, and in so doing has inadequately explored and theorised involuntary and coerced mobility. To illustrate this, the paper draws together two literatures that have thus far been poorly integrated, and that at first seem an unlikely pairing – the mobilities work that has exploded in scope and diversity over the past decade and that seeks to ‘undermine sedentarist theories’ in geography, and the nascent field of ‘carceral geography’, a body of work beginning to coalesce around the spatialities of detention and imprisonment, but that, in its focus on spatial regulation, has thus far tended to overlook the mobilities inherent in carceral practices. The two are drawn together through consideration of an example of ‘disciplined mobility’ – contemporary prisoner transport in the Russian Federation, which serves as an illustration both of punitive power expressed through mobility and of mobility in the carceral context. The paper then argues that future research in mobilities must consider more fully the disciplinary nature of mobility, and suggests that the concept of ‘disciplined mobility’, may form a framework for such future research.

69 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In light of the recent proliferation and co-presence of institutional and makeshift camps and encampments in Europe, the authors explores the current multifaceted geographies of the camp and their...
Abstract: In light of the recent proliferation and co-presence of institutional and makeshift camps and encampments in Europe, this article explores the current multifaceted geographies of the camp and their...

66 citations