scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Richard Conrad Hoyt

Bio: Richard Conrad Hoyt is an academic researcher from Iowa State University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ammonium & Precipitation (chemistry). The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 15 citations.

Papers
More filters
ReportDOI
01 Apr 1978
TL;DR: In this article, a microfilm copy of the original dissertation is used to reproduce the markings or patterns which may appear on this reproduction. But, the quality of the reproduction is heavily dependent upon the original submitted.
Abstract: Precipitation kinetics of a continuous precipitator, with application to the precipitation of ammonium polyuranate" (1978). Retrospective Theses and Dissertations. Paper 6459. INFORMATION TO USERS This material was produced from a microfilm copy of the original document. While the most advanced technological means to photograph and reproduce this document have been used, the quality is heavily dependent upon the quality of the original submitted. The following explanation of techniques is provided to help you understand markings or patterns which may appear on this reproduction. 1.The sign or "target" for pages apparently lacking from the document photographed is "Missing Page(s)". if it was possible to obtain the missing page(s) or section, they are spliced into the film along with adjacent pages. This may have necessitated cutting thru an image and duplicating adjacent pages to insure you complete continuity. 2. When an image on the film is obliterated with a large round black mark, it is an indication that the photographer suspected that the copy may have moved during exposure and thus cause a blurred image. You will find a good image of the page in the adjacent frame. 3. When a map, drawing or chart, etc., was part of the material being photographed the photographer followed a definite method in "sectioning" the material. It is customary to begin photoing at the upper left hand corner of a large sheet and to continue photoing from left to right in equal sections with a small overlap. If necessary, sectioning is continued again — beginning below the first row and continuing on until complete. 4. The majority of users indicate that the textual content is of greatest value, however, a somewhat higher quality reproduction could be made from "photographs" if essential to the understanding of the dissertation. Silver prints of "photographs" may be ordered at additional charge by writing the Order Department, giving the catalog number, title, author and specific pages you wish reproduced. 1978 Signature was redacted for privacy.

16 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a survey was made of framboid size distributions in recently deposited sediments from euxinic (Black Sea; Framvaren Fjord, Norway; Pettaquamscutt River Estuary, Rhode Island, USA), dysoxic (Peru Margin), and oxic (Wallops Island, Virginia, USA; Great Salt Marsh, Delaware, USA) environments.

912 citations

01 Jan 1971
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the effects of UO 2 on the integrity of the zircaloy cladding tube, particularly since the properties of this material are so adversely affected by irradiation.
Abstract: Because UO 2 expands more than the zircaloy cladding tube, is hotter, cracks and swells, the UO 2 will interact with the cladding. How much, is dependent upon the gap, length of pellet, whether it has flat ends or not, the depth of the dish, the width of the shoulder, heat load, rate of power increase and cladding properties. The stress-strain pattern can be very complicated. It usually has a changing multiaxiality with consequent varying strains to fracture, and the strains may be concentrated over small lengths of the cladding tube. All this adds up to a threat to the integrity of the zircaloy, particularly since the properties of this material are so adversely affected by irradiation. To avoid difficulties and failure, the pellet shape, dimensions and density and cladding properties should be chosen with due regard to reactor system conditions, the way the reactor is loaded and operated. The ideal cladding should have good ductility and high strength at the same time. Such a combination seems impossible, unfortunately. Many of the processes described we know only qualitatively. We have, therefore, a definite need for many more precisely defined and executed experiments, preferably in-pile. Precisely dimensioned, shaped and formed hardware has but little use, if flux shape along a rod and heat production cannot be determined with commensurable accuracy. So, while on this end of the fuel design spectrum we toil to sharpen out tools, may I express the hope that our colleagues on the other end of the spectrum, the physicist and the thermohydraulicist, will make equal progress.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 2003-Langmuir
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigated the mechanism of particle formation in a new process that combines the principles of photopolymerization and compressed antisolvent processing, which can result in highly cross-linked microparticles with a spherical morphology.
Abstract: We investigated the mechanism of particle formation in a new process that combines the principles of photopolymerization and compressed antisolvent processing. In this process, photopolymerization occurs when homogeneous solutions of monomer, initiator, and solvent are exposed to initiating light while being simultaneously introduced into a compressed antisolvent, which can result in highly cross-linked microparticles with a spherical morphology. The resulting particles, when examined using aerodynamic particle sizing, exhibit a bimodal particle size distribution. Ternary phase diagrams of antisolvent, monomer, and solvent solutions were measured and used to explain the mechanism(s) of particle formation. Specific concentration paths from the resulting ternary phase diagrams were investigated, and the significance of crossing the binodal, as well as the importance of where the binodal was crossed, was explained. In addition, manipulation of atomization conditions, varying process residence times, and nucleation rate calculations were used to further investigate the means of particle formation.

12 citations