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Author

Richard L. Chambers

Bio: Richard L. Chambers is an academic researcher from University of Chicago. The author has contributed to research in topics: Empire & Turkish. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 3 publications receiving 69 citations.
Topics: Empire, Turkish, Islam, Democracy, Politics

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In 1924, the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly of Turkey as mentioned in this paper, and the century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medrees.
Abstract: In 1924 the doors of the medreses of Turkey were ordered closed by the Grand National Assembly. The century-old movement to modernize and secularize Turkish education reached a crucial watershed with the abandonment of the traditional Islamic system of mektebs and medreses. The bifurcation which had characterized Ottoman education since the early nineteenth century and which had been reflected in the empire's educated elite could not be tolerated in the new, secular republic envisaged by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

20 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: The Ottoman Empire was one of the most important non-western states to survive from medieval to modern times, and played a vital role in European and global history as mentioned in this paper, and it continues to affect the peoples of the Middle East, the Balkans and central and western Europe to the present day.
Abstract: The Ottoman Empire was one of the most important non-Western states to survive from medieval to modern times, and played a vital role in European and global history. It continues to affect the peoples of the Middle East, the Balkans and central and western Europe to the present day. This new survey examines the major trends during the latter years of the empire; it pays attention to gender issues and to hotly-debated topics such as the treatment of minorities. In this second edition, Donald Quataert has updated his lively and authoritative text, revised the bibliographies, and included brief biographies of major figures on the Byzantines and the post Ottoman Middle East. This accessible narrative is supported by maps, illustrations and genealogical and chronological tables, which will be of help to students and non-specialists alike. It will appeal to anyone interested in the history of the Middle East.

235 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The authors analyzes the transformation of the Ottoman Empire over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and views privatization of state lands and the increase of domestic and foreign trade as key factors in the rise of a Muslim middle class, which, increasingly aware of its economic interests and communal roots, then attempted to reshape the government to reflect its ideals.
Abstract: Combining international and domestic perspectives, this book analyzes the transformation of the Ottoman Empire over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It views privatization of state lands and the increase of domestic and foreign trade as key factors in the rise of a Muslim middle class, which, increasingly aware of its economic interests and communal roots, then attempted to reshape the government to reflect its ideals.

207 citations

Book
14 Mar 2011
TL;DR: Shattering Empires as mentioned in this paper is a study of the Ottoman-Russian borderlands in the early 20th century, focusing on the rivalry and collapse of two great empires, and argues that geopolitical competition and the emergence of a new global interstate order provide the key to understanding the course of history in the Ottoman and Russian borderlands.
Abstract: The break-up of the Ottoman empire and the disintegration of the Russian empire were watershed events in modern history. The unravelling of these empires was both cause and consequence of World War I and resulted in the deaths of millions. It irrevocably changed the landscape of the Middle East and Eurasia and reverberates to this day in conflicts throughout the Caucasus and Middle East. Shattering Empires draws on extensive research in the Ottoman and Russian archives to tell the story of the rivalry and collapse of two great empires. Overturning accounts that portray their clash as one of conflicting nationalisms, this pioneering study argues that geopolitical competition and the emergence of a new global interstate order provide the key to understanding the course of history in the Ottoman-Russian borderlands in the twentieth century. It will appeal to those interested in Middle Eastern, Russian, and Eurasian history, international relations, ethnic conflict, and World War I.

155 citations

Book
01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: Faroqhi as mentioned in this paper showed that there was no iron curtain between the Ottoman and other worlds but rather a long-established network of diplomatic, financial, cultural and religious connections.
Abstract: The first paperback edition, in line with latest historiography - "Ottoman Empire" is a major and advanced early modern power, this book is based on a huge study of original sources and personal accounts. The author leading historian of early modern Ottoman Empire in all aspects - political, economic, diplomatic and cultural. In Islamic law the world was made up of the House of Islam and the House of War with the Ottoman Sultan - the perceived successor to the Caliphs - supreme ruler of the Islamic world. However, Suraiya Faroqhi demonstrates that there was no iron curtain between the Ottoman and other worlds but rather a long-established network of diplomatic, financial, cultural and religious connections. These extended to the empires of Asia and the modern states of Europe. Faroqhi's book is based on a huge study of original and early modern sources, including diplomatic records, travel and geographical writing, as well as personal accounts. Its breadth and originality will make it essential reading for historians of Europe and the Middle East.

115 citations