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Author

Richard Seltzer

Other affiliations: University of Washington
Bio: Richard Seltzer is an academic researcher from Howard University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Religiosity & Racism. The author has an hindex of 11, co-authored 25 publications receiving 406 citations. Previous affiliations of Richard Seltzer include University of Washington.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of skin-color differences in Afro-American society and politics has been examined in this paper. But, their focus was on the social and political attitudes of black Americans.
Abstract: What is the role of skin-color differences in Afro-American society and politics? In recent years, there has been an upsurge of interest in the phenomenon, especially among historians (Morton, 1985). The purpose of this brief article is to analyze recent socialscience survey data on the significance of color stratification among Afro-Americans. It has long been argued that there are significant social-class differences between lightand darker-skin Blacks, as well as differences in social and political attitudes (Frazier, 1957, p. 18; Myrdal, 1944, 1962, pp. 695-700). In this article, we test the validity of this hypothesis about skin-color differences among Black Americans and the differences they make in terms of social and political attitudes.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that respondents were more likely to hold anti-homosexual attitudes if they were politically conservative, religious, older, less educated, male, married or widowed, or from the South.
Abstract: Using data from a 1985 national sample of over 2300 adults, an index of attitudes toward homosexuality was created from 13 different questions. Respondents were more likely to hold antihomosexual attitudes if they were politically conservative, religious, older, less educated, male, married or widowed, or from the South. The effects of religiosity were less pronounced among black respondents. In addition, middle-aged respondents were more liberal than younger or older respondents if they were college educated or black.

82 citations

Book
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: In this paper, the Internal Foundations of Afro-american Mass Culture and the Internal Dynamics of Mass Culture are discussed, and the patterning of racial differences in Mass Culture is discussed.
Abstract: Tables Preface 1. Theoretical Perspectives 2. Patterning of Racial Differences in Mass Culture 3. Class and the Patterning of Racial Differences in Mass Culture 4. The Internal Foundations of Afro-American Mass Culture 5. Afro-American Culture and the Internal Dynamics of Mass Culture 6. Conclusion Appendix Notes References Index

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: The authors measured the extent to which there is support among blacks, compared to whites, for conservative positions on contemporary social and economic issues and found that black support for conservative policy preferences was higher than white support.
Abstract: THE HISTORY OF MASS BLACK OPINION is noted for its liberal, not conservative, ideology and policy preferences.' With the advent of the Reagan Administration, however, there has been considerable speculation about the level of support in the black community for conservative policy preferences.2 The purpose of this paper is to measure the extent to which there is support among blacks, compared to whites, for conservative positions on contemporary social and economic issues.

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, over three hundred police officers from the District of Columbia were surveyed as they waited for court appearances and found that although police officers were satisfied with their jobs, morale was low.
Abstract: Over three hundred police officers from the District of Columbia were surveyed as they waited for court appearances. Although police officers were satisfied with their jobs, morale was low. Background and situational variables did not adequately predict satisfaction levels. Satisfaction levels were better predicted given an officer’s attitudes toward their fellow officers, their superiors, and the race‐relations/promotion process within the Department.

28 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Prospect Theory led cognitive psychology in a new direction that began to uncover other human biases in thinking that are probably not learned but are part of the authors' brain’s wiring.
Abstract: In 1974 an article appeared in Science magazine with the dry-sounding title “Judgment Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases” by a pair of psychologists who were not well known outside their discipline of decision theory. In it Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman introduced the world to Prospect Theory, which mapped out how humans actually behave when faced with decisions about gains and losses, in contrast to how economists assumed that people behave. Prospect Theory turned Economics on its head by demonstrating through a series of ingenious experiments that people are much more concerned with losses than they are with gains, and that framing a choice from one perspective or the other will result in decisions that are exactly the opposite of each other, even if the outcomes are monetarily the same. Prospect Theory led cognitive psychology in a new direction that began to uncover other human biases in thinking that are probably not learned but are part of our brain’s wiring.

4,351 citations

01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: A Different Mirror as mentioned in this paper is a retelling of America's history, a powerful larger narrative of the many different peoples who together compose the United States of America, with the stories and voices of people previously left out of the historical canon.
Abstract: "A Different Mirror" is a dramatic new retelling of our nation's history, a powerful larger narrative of the many different peoples who together compose the United States of America. In a lively account filled with the stories and voices of people previously left out of the historical canon, Ronald Takaki offers a fresh perspective - a "re-visioning" - of our nation's past.

1,025 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jeni Loftus1
TL;DR: Using General Social Survey data from 1973 to 1998, this article examined changing American attitudes toward homosexuality and found that Americans became increasingly negative regarding the morality of homosexuality through 1990, but since then their attitudes have become increasingly liberal.
Abstract: Using General Social Survey data from 1973 to 1998, changing American attitudes toward homosexuality are examined. Two hypotheses are tested: (1) Can changes in attitudes be accounted for by the changing demographics of the population? (2) Are changing attitudes toward homosexuality embedded within larger cultural ideological shifts? The data indicate that Americans distinguish between the morality of homosexuality and the civil liberties of homosexuals. Americans became increasingly negative regarding the morality of homosexuality through 1990, but since then their attitudes have become increasingly liberal. The same 25-year period witnessed a steady decline in Americans' willingness to restrict the civil liberties of homosexuals. Changes in American demographics-particularly increasing educational levels-and changing cultural ideological beliefs can account for only about one-half of the change over time in attitudes toward homosexuality. Several theories are put forth to explain these patterns of change and the distinction made between morality and civil liberties

670 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

518 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Margaret Hunter1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the experiences of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans with regard to skin color and demonstrate that light-skinned people have clear advantages in these areas, even when controlling for other background variables.
Abstract: Colorism is a persistent problem for people of color in the USA Colorism, or skin color stratification, is a process that privileges light-skinned people of color over dark in areas such as income, education, housing, and the marriage market This essay describes the experiences of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans with regard to skin color Research demonstrates that light-skinned people have clear advantages in these areas, even when controlling for other background variables However, dark-skinned people of color are typically regarded as more ethnically authentic or legitimate than light-skinned people Colorism is directly related to the larger system of racism in the USA and around the world The color complex is also exported around the globe, in part through US media images, and helps to sustain the multibillion-dollar skin bleaching and cosmetic surgery industries Racial discrimination is a pervasive problem in the USA African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and other people of color are routinely denied access to resources and fair competition for jobs and schooling Despite this pattern of exclusion, people of color have made great progress in combating persistent discrimination in housing, the labor market, and education However, hidden within the process of racial discrimination is the often overlooked issue of colorism Colorism is the process of discrimination that privileges light-skinned people of color over their dark-skinned counterparts (Hunter 2005) Colorism is concerned with actual skin tone, as opposed to racial or ethnic identity This is an important distinction because race is a social concept, not significantly tied to biology (Hirschman 2004) Lighter-skinned people of color enjoy substantial privileges that are still unattainable to their darker-skinned brothers and sisters In fact, light-skinned people earn more money, complete more years of schooling, live in better neighborhoods, and marry higher-status people than darker-skinned people of the same race or ethnicity (Arce et al 1987; Espino and Franz 2002; Hill 2000; Hughes and Hertel 1990; Hunter 1998, 2005; Keith and Herring 1991; Murguia and Telles 1996; Rondilla and Spickard 2007)

507 citations