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Rinat B. Rosenberg-Kima

Bio: Rinat B. Rosenberg-Kima is an academic researcher from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Computer science & Mathematics education. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 18 publications receiving 518 citations. Previous affiliations of Rinat B. Rosenberg-Kima include University of California, Berkeley & Tel Aviv University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The findings indicate that interface agents may be used effectively as social models for influencing attitudes and beliefs and supporting performance in male and female middle-school students' attitudes toward engineering-related fields and their math performance.
Abstract: Women's under-representation in fields such as engineering may result in part from female students' negative beliefs regarding these fields and their low self-efficacy for these fields. In this experiment, we investigated the use of animated interface agents as social models for changing male and female middle-school students' attitudes toward engineering-related fields, their self-efficacy for these fields, and their math performance. Students interacted with either a female or a male computer-based agent or they did not interact with an agent. The female agent increased interest, utility beliefs, self-efficacy, and math performance compared to control and, for boys, decreased stereotyping. Mediational analyses indicated that the female agent facilitated interest and math performance by enhancing self-efficacy. The findings indicate that interface agents may be used effectively as social models for influencing attitudes and beliefs and supporting performance.

153 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results revealed that participants who interact with the visible agents reported significantly greater utility for engineering, greater self-efficacy, and greater interest in engineering-related fields than those who interacted with a human voice.

126 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Mar 2017
TL;DR: It is found that children who played with a growth mindset robot 1) self-reported having a stronger growth mindset and 2) tried harder during a challenging task, as compared to children who play with the neutral mindset robot.
Abstract: Mindset has been shown to have a large impact on peo-ple‘s academic, social, and work achievements. A growth mindset, i.e., the belief that success comes from effort and perseverance, is a better indicator of higher achievements as compared to a fixed mindset, i.e., the belief that things are set and cannot be changed. Interventions aimed at promoting a growth mindset in children range from teaching about the brain's ability to learn and change, to playing computer games that grant brain points for effort rather than success. This work explores a novel paradigm to foster a growth mindset in young children where they play a puzzle solving game with a peer-like social robot. The social robot is fully autonomous and programmed with behaviors suggestive of it having either a growth mindset or a neutral mindset as it plays puzzle games with the child. We measure the mindset of children before and after interacting with the peer-like robot, in addition to measuring their problem solving behavior when faced with a challenging puzzle. We found that children who played with a growth mindset robot 1) self-reported having a stronger growth mindset and 2) tried harder during a challenging task, as compared to children who played with the neutral mindset robot. These results suggest that interacting with peer-like social robot with a growth mindset can promote the same mindset in children.

97 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored the use of interface agents, anthropomorphic, 3D-animated computer characters that provide teaching or mentoring within a computer-based learning environment, to encourage young Black and White women to pursue careers in engineering.
Abstract: Background This study explored the use of interface agents, anthropomorphic, 3D-animated computer characters that provide teaching or mentoring within a computer-based learning environment, to encourage young Black and White women to pursue careers in engineering. Purpose (Hypothesis) We hypothesized that computer-based models that matched young women in terms of their race and gender would be the most effective in positively influencing their interest, self-efficacy, and stereotypes about engineering. Design/Method Eighty African American undergraduate female students in Experiment 1, and 39 White undergraduate female students in Experiment 2 interacted with a computer-based agent that provided a narrative designed to encourage them to pursue engineering careers. The study employed a 2 × 2 between subjects factorial design (agent gender: male vs. female and agent race: Black vs. White). Results Across both studies we found that race and gender influenced the effectiveness of the agent for several key outcome measures. Computer-based agents who matched the participants with respect to race and gender tended to be the most effective in improving the women's responses to engineering-related fields. Nevertheless, the White male agent was actually significantly more influential than the White female agent for female Black participants. Conclusions Personalizing interface agent characteristics to match the target population can increase the effectiveness of a persuasive message to encourage young women to pursue engineering. Such an approach may contribute to the growth and inclusiveness of fields such as engineering.

59 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
21 Apr 2006
TL;DR: Results revealed that participants reported more positive stereotypes of engineers after interacting with a female agent, and that agents who were young and "cool" and old and "uncool" were both most effective on enhancing self-efficacy toward engineering.
Abstract: This experimental study investigated the impact of interface agent appearance (age, gender, "coolness") on enhancing undergraduate females' attitudes toward engineering. Results revealed that participants reported more positive stereotypes of engineers after interacting with a female agent. In contrast, participants interacting with a male agent reported that engineering was more useful and engaging. An interaction of "coolness" and age indicated that agents who were young and "cool" (i.e., peer-like; similar to participants) and agents who were old and "uncool" (stereotypical engineers) were both most effective on enhancing self-efficacy toward engineering.

58 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An automated kiosk that uses embodied intelligent agents to interview individuals and detect changes in arousal, behavior, and cognitive effort by using psychophysiological information systems was created and smiling agents were perceived as more likable than neutral demeanor agents.
Abstract: We have created an automated kiosk that uses embodied intelligent agents to interview individuals and detect changes in arousal, behavior, and cognitive effort by using psychophysiological information systems. In this paper, we describe the system and propose a unique class of intelligent agents, which are described as Special Purpose Embodied Conversational Intelligence with Environmental Sensors (SPECIES). SPECIES agents use heterogeneous sensors to detect human physiology and behavior during interactions, and they affect their environment by influencing human behavior using various embodied states (i.e., gender and demeanor), messages, and recommendations. Based on the SPECIES paradigm, we present three studies that evaluate different portions of the model, and these studies are used as foundational research for the development of the automated kiosk. The first study evaluates human-computer interaction and how SPECIES agents can change perceptions of information systems by varying appearance and demeanor. Instantiations that had the agents embodied as males were perceived as more powerful, while female embodied agents were perceived as more likable. Similarly, smiling agents were perceived as more likable than neutral demeanor agents. The second study demonstrated that a single sensor measuring vocal pitch provides SPECIES with environmental awareness of human stress and deception. The final study ties the first two studies together and demonstrates an avatar-based kiosk that asks questions and measures the responses using vocalic measurements.

272 citations

Book ChapterDOI
21 May 2014
TL;DR: This review examines the results, methods, measured behavioral and psychological outcomes, affordances in implemented persuasive systems, and domains of the studies in the current body of research on persuasive technologies.
Abstract: This paper reviews the current body of empirical research on persuasive technologies 95 studies. In recent years, technology has been increasingly harnessed to persuade and motivate people to engage in various behaviors. This phenomenon has also attracted substantial scholarly interest over the last decade. This review examines the results, methods, measured behavioral and psychological outcomes, affordances in implemented persuasive systems, and domains of the studies in the current body of research on persuasive technologies. The reviewed studies have investigated diverse persuasive systems/designs, psychological factors, and behavioral outcomes. The results of the reviewed studies were categorized into fully positive, partially positive, and negative and/or no effects. This review provides an overview of the state of empirical research regarding persuasive technologies. The paper functions as a reference in positioning future research within the research stream of persuasive technologies in terms of the domain, the persuasive stimuli and the psychological and behavioral outcomes.

268 citations

19 Aug 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the screen shows a bag of popcorn on a table. Several kernels have fallen from the bag and an adult asks a question about the picture: "What will happen to the popcorn if I pick up the television set and turn it upside down?"
Abstract: The screen shows a bag of popcorn on a table. Several kernels have fallen from the bag. An adult, watching with preschool children, asks a question about the picture: "What will happen to the popcorn if I pick up the television set and turn it upside down?" A lot of kids say that the rest of the popcorn will spill out of the bag. While interesting, this mistake is not really surprising. Children often take television literally. They'll soon be older, and will be wise enough to know better.

248 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: More than 70 articles on pedagogical agents have been published since 2002, and 26 of them examine motivational and learning effects as mentioned in this paper, and the review reveals that various studies have not investigated the first two fundamental questions due to a lack of control groups.

214 citations