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Robert B. Weinstock

Bio: Robert B. Weinstock is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Molecular orbital & Atomic orbital. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7590 citations.

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TL;DR: In this paper, a method of "natural population analysis" was developed to calculate atomic charges and orbital populations of molecular wave functions in general atomic orbital basis sets, which seems to exhibit improved numerical stability and to better describe the electron distribution in compounds of high ionic character.
Abstract: A method of ‘‘natural population analysis’’ has been developed to calculate atomic charges and orbital populations of molecular wave functions in general atomic orbital basis sets. The natural analysis is an alternative to conventional Mulliken population analysis, and seems to exhibit improved numerical stability and to better describe the electron distribution in compounds of high ionic character, such as those containing metal atoms. We calculated ab initio SCF‐MO wave functions for compounds of type CH3X and LiX (X=F, OH, NH2, CH3, BH2, BeH, Li, H) in a variety of basis sets to illustrate the generality of the method, and to compare the natural populations with results of Mulliken analysis, density integration, and empirical measures of ionic character. Natural populations are found to give a satisfactory description of these molecules, providing a unified treatment of covalent and extreme ionic limits at modest computational cost.

8,332 citations


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TL;DR: The “Activation‐strain TS interaction” (ATS) model of chemical reactivity is reviewed as a conceptual framework for understanding how activation barriers of various types of reaction mechanisms arise and how they may be controlled, for example, in organic chemistry or homogeneous catalysis.
Abstract: We present the theoretical and technical foundations of the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) program with a survey of the characteristics of the code (numerical integration, density fitting for the Coulomb potential, and STO basis functions). Recent developments enhance the efficiency of ADF (e.g., parallelization, near order-N scaling, QM/MM) and its functionality (e.g., NMR chemical shifts, COSMO solvent effects, ZORA relativistic method, excitation energies, frequency-dependent (hyper)polarizabilities, atomic VDD charges). In the Applications section we discuss the physical model of the electronic structure and the chemical bond, i.e., the Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (MO) theory, and illustrate the power of the Kohn–Sham MO model in conjunction with the ADF-typical fragment approach to quantitatively understand and predict chemical phenomena. We review the “Activation-strain TS interaction” (ATS) model of chemical reactivity as a conceptual framework for understanding how activation barriers of various types of (competing) reaction mechanisms arise and how they may be controlled, for example, in organic chemistry or homogeneous catalysis. Finally, we include a brief discussion of exemplary applications in the field of biochemistry (structure and bonding of DNA) and of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to indicate how this development further reinforces the ADF tools for the analysis of chemical phenomena. © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Comput Chem 22: 931–967, 2001

8,490 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces.
Abstract: Advances in theory and algorithms for electronic structure calculations must be incorporated into program packages to enable them to become routinely used by the broader chemical community. This work reviews advances made over the past five years or so that constitute the major improvements contained in a new release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry package, together with illustrative timings and applications. Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces.

2,527 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A summary of the technical advances that are incorporated in the fourth major release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry program is provided in this paper, covering approximately the last seven years, including developments in density functional theory and algorithms, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) property evaluation, coupled cluster and perturbation theories, methods for electronically excited and open-shell species, tools for treating extended environments, algorithms for walking on potential surfaces, analysis tools, energy and electron transfer modelling, parallel computing capabilities, and graphical user interfaces.
Abstract: A summary of the technical advances that are incorporated in the fourth major release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry program is provided, covering approximately the last seven years. These include developments in density functional theory methods and algorithms, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) property evaluation, coupled cluster and perturbation theories, methods for electronically excited and open-shell species, tools for treating extended environments, algorithms for walking on potential surfaces, analysis tools, energy and electron transfer modelling, parallel computing capabilities, and graphical user interfaces. In addition, a selection of example case studies that illustrate these capabilities is given. These include extensive benchmarks of the comparative accuracy of modern density functionals for bonded and non-bonded interactions, tests of attenuated second order Moller–Plesset (MP2) methods for intermolecular interactions, a variety of parallel performance benchmarks, and tests of the accuracy of implicit solvation models. Some specific chemical examples include calculations on the strongly correlated Cr_2 dimer, exploring zeolite-catalysed ethane dehydrogenation, energy decomposition analysis of a charged ter-molecular complex arising from glycerol photoionisation, and natural transition orbitals for a Frenkel exciton state in a nine-unit model of a self-assembling nanotube.

2,396 citations

01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: Detailed benchmarks of the comparative accuracy of modern density functionals for bonded and non-bonded interactions, tests of attenuated second order Møller–Plesset methods for intermolecular interactions, and tests of the accuracy of implicit solvation models are provided.
Abstract: A summary of the technical advances that are incorporated in the fourth major release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry program is provided, covering approximately the last seven years. These include developments in density functional theory methods and algorithms, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) property evaluation, coupled cluster and perturbation theories, methods for electronically excited and open-shell species, tools for treating extended environments, algorithms for walking on potential surfaces, analysis tools, energy and electron transfer modelling, parallel computing capabilities, and graphical user interfaces. In addition, a selection of example case studies that illustrate these capabilities is given. These include extensive benchmarks of the comparative accuracy of modern density functionals for bonded and non-bonded interactions, tests of attenuated second order Møller–Plesset (MP2) methods for intermolecular interactions, a variety of parallel performance benchmarks, and tests of the accuracy of implicit solvation models. Some specific chemical examples include calculations on the strongly correlated Cr2 dimer, exploring zeolite-catalysed ethane dehydrogenation, energy decomposition analysis of a charged ter-molecular complex arising from glycerol photoionisation, and natural transition orbitals for a Frenkel exciton state in a nine-unit model of a self-assembling nanotube.

1,919 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the electronic structure of the radical CH 2 OH was analyzed via the "different hybrids for different spins" natural bond orbital (DHDS NBO) procedure, which finds separate Lewis structures for each of the spin systems.
Abstract: We have carried out ab initio UHF/6-31G* calculations on the hydroxymethyl radical, CH 2 OH, and have found the equilibrium structure to be nearly planar with barriers to internal rotation occurring at staggered and eclipsed geometries, in good agreement with experiment. The electronic structure of the radical was analyzed via the “different hybrids for different spins” natural bond orbital (DHDS NBO) procedure, which finds separate Lewis structures for each of the spin systems. The α spin Lewis structure resembles that of the anion; the β spin Lewis structure resembles the corresponding cation. This simple picture, in conjunction with Bent's rule, allows one to understand the principal electronic factors which dictate the structure of the radical CH 2 group and its torsional and inversion potentials. Charge transfer between oxygen non-bonding orbitals and the empty radical orbital in the β spin system is the dominant interaction determining the torsional potential. Smaller hyperconjugative interactions in the α spin system resemble interactions in closed-shell molecules and directly oppose the effect of radical hyperconjugation, thus illustrating the central idea that open-shell potential energy features result from competition between the two different spin systems.

1,866 citations