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Author

Robert F. Landel

Bio: Robert F. Landel is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Creep & Stress relaxation. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publication(s) receiving 3083 citation(s).

Papers
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Book
14 Dec 1993
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss various mechanical properties of fiber-filled composites, such as elastic moduli, creep and stress relaxation, and other mechanical properties such as stress-strain behavior and strength.
Abstract: Mechanical Tests and Polymer Transitions * Elastic Moduli * Creep and Stress Relaxation * Dynamical Mechanical Properties * Stress-Strain Behaviour and Strength * Other mechanical Properties * Particulate-Filled Polymers * Fiber- Filled Composites and Other Composites.

3,083 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: The combination of materials to form a new material system with enhanced material properties is a well documented historical fact as discussed by the authors, which is why many artisans from the Mediterranean and Far East used a form of composite technology in molding art works which were fabricated by layering cut paper in various sizes for producing desired shapes and contours.
Abstract: The combination of materials to form a new material system with enhanced material properties is a well documented historical fact. For example, the ancient Jewish workers during their tenure under the Pharaohs used chopped straws in bricks as a means of enhancing their structural integrity. The Japanese Samurai warriors were known to use laminated metals in the forging of their swords to obtain desirable material properties. Even certain artisans from the Mediterranean and Far East used a form of composite technology in molding art works which were fabricated by layering cut paper in various sizes for producing desired shapes and contours.

3,908 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the properties of nylon 6-clay hybrids, such as molecular composites of nylon and silicate layers of montmorillonite and saponite, NCH's and NCHP's, respectively, have been synthesized.
Abstract: Various nylon 6-clay hybrids, such as molecular composites of nylon 6 and silicate layers of montmorillonite and saponite, NCH's and NCHP's, respectively, have been synthesized. To estimate the mechanical properties of these hybrids, tensile, flexural, impact, and heat distortion tests were carried out. NCH was found superior in strength and modulus and comparable in impact strength to nylon 6. The heat distortion temperature (HDT) of NCH (montmorillonite: 4.7 wt. %) was 152 °C, which was 87 °C higher than that of nylon 6. In NCHP, saponite had a smaller effect on the increase of these mechanical properties. The modulus and HDT of NCH and NCHP increased with an increase in the amount of clay minerals. It was found that these properties were well described by the contribution of the constrained region calculated from the storage and loss modulus at the glass transition temperature. According to the mixing law on elastic modulus, the following expression was obtained between the modulus E at 120 °C and the fraction of the constrained region C, En = Ecn = C, where the values of n and Ec (modulus of the constrained region) were 0.685 and 1.02 GPa, respectively.

2,431 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the effects of particle size, particle/matrix interface adhesion and particle loading on the stiffness, strength and toughness of such particulate polymer composites are reviewed.
Abstract: There have been a number of review papers on layered silicate and carbon nanotube reinforced polymer nanocomposites, in which the fillers have high aspect ratios. Particulate–polymer nanocomposites containing fillers with small aspect ratios are also an important class of polymer composites. However, they have been apparently overlooked. Thus, in this paper, detailed discussions on the effects of particle size, particle/matrix interface adhesion and particle loading on the stiffness, strength and toughness of such particulate–polymer composites are reviewed. To develop high performance particulate composites, it is necessary to have some basic understanding of the stiffening, strengthening and toughening mechanisms of these composites. A critical evaluation of published experimental results in comparison with theoretical models is given.

2,397 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the use of pretreated natural fibers in polymer matrix-based composites has been reviewed and the effect of surface modification of natural fibers on the properties of fibers and fiber reinforced polymer composites is also discussed.
Abstract: In recent years, natural fibers reinforced composites have received much attention because of their lightweight, nonabrasive, combustible, nontoxic, low cost and biodegradable properties. Among the various natural fibers; flax, bamboo, sisal, hemp, ramie, jute, and wood fibers are of particular interest. A lot of research work has been performed all over the world on the use of natural fibers as a reinforcing material for the preparation of various types of composites. However, lack of good interfacial adhesion, low melting point, and poor resistance towards moisture make the use of natural fiber reinforced composites less attractive. Pretreatments of the natural fiber can clean the fiber surface, chemically modify the surface, stop the moisture absorption process, and increase the surface roughness. Among the various pretreatment techniques, graft copolymerization and plasma treatment are the best methods for surface modification of natural fibers. Graft copolymers of natural fibers with vinyl monomers provide better adhesion between matrix and fiber. In the present article, the use of pretreated natural fibers in polymer matrix-based composites has been reviewed. Effect of surface modification of natural fibers on the properties of fibers and fiber reinforced polymer composites has also been discussed. POLYM. ENG. SCI., 2009. © 2009 Society of Plastics Engineers

1,051 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sisal fiber is a promising reinforcement for use in composites on account of its low cost, low density, high specific strength and modulus, no health risk, easy availability in some countries and renewability as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Sisal fibre is a promising reinforcement for use in composites on account of its low cost, low density, high specific strength and modulus, no health risk, easy availability in some countries and renewability. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in finding new applications for sisal-fibre-reinforced composites that are traditionally used for making ropes, mats, carpets, fancy articles and others. This review presents a summary of recent developments of sisal fibre and its composites. The properties of sisal fibre itself, interface between sisal fibre and matrix, properties of sisal-fibre-reinforced composites and their hybrid composites have been reviewed. Suggestions for future work are also given.

946 citations