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Robert S. Albert

Other affiliations: University of Oregon
Bio: Robert S. Albert is an academic researcher from Pitzer College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Creativity & Divergent thinking. The author has an hindex of 14, co-authored 19 publications receiving 2151 citations. Previous affiliations of Robert S. Albert include University of Oregon.

Papers
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Book
01 May 1990
TL;DR: A survey of contemporary theories of creativity can be found in this article, where a range of sub-topics, levels of analysis, and emphases within the study of creativity are discussed.
Abstract: This article surveys the range of contemporary theories of creativity. These are heuristically divided into ten categories: developmental, psychometric, economic, stage and componential process, cognitive, problem solving and expertise-based, problem finding, evolutionary, typological, and systems. These perspectives span a range of subtopics, levels of analysis, and emphases within the study of creativity. Beyond the general overview, prospects for the future role and development of theories of creativity are discussed, offering a critical but hopefully constructive appraisal of current theories and their promise for a continued deeper understanding of the nature of creativity.

987 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Oct 1998
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the history of research on creativity and the evolution of the concepts of research and creativity in terms of the time, place, and spirit of creativity.
Abstract: The title we have given this chapter is meant to signal to readers that we recognize that the history we describe is one among other possible histories of the same subject. This chapter truly presents a and not the history of research on creativity. Our attempt to describe the broad and extended historical changes in the concept of creativity can be easily contrasted with efforts to describe the narrower historical changes in actual creativity. Bullough, Bullough, and Mauro (1981), Gray (1966), Kroeber (1944, 1956), Martindale (1992), Naroll et al. (1971), and Sorokin (1947) compared specific historical eras in terms of various indices of creativity. Bullough et al., for instance, compared eighteenth-century Scotland with fifteenth-century Italy. Historical differences in content and abstractness are also implied in studies of Zeitgeist; these assume that there is a “spirit” that is unique to creative eras (Boring, 1929; Simonton, in press). Additional historical perspectives are involved in studies of eminent creators's developmental background and careers. Although they may not have influenced the meeting of research and creativity , investigations of eminent persons have contributed chiefly to the way we think about creativity (see, e.g., Albert, 1975; Gardner, 1994; Ochse, 1990; Roe, 1952). Our own perspective directed us to the work of eminent individuals (e.g., Francis Bacon, Darwin, Galton, Malthus, and Adam Smith) who had particular impact on the clarification and eventual meeting of the concepts of research and creativity.

206 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Divergent thinking tests are probably the most commonly employed measures of creative potential and have demonstrated adequate psychometric properties with many populations as discussed by the authors, however, a recent study suggests that divergent thinking test may not be suitable for many populations.
Abstract: Divergent thinking tests are probably the most commonly employed measures of creative potential and have demonstrated adequate psychometric properties with many populations. Recently, however, a pa...

175 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Robert S. Albert1
TL;DR: The idols imposed by words on the understanding are of two kinds: names of things which exist, but yet confused and ill-defined, and hastily and irregularly derived from realities.
Abstract: The idols imposed by words on the understanding are of two kinds. They are either names of things which do not exist (for as there are things left unnamed through lack of observation, so likewise are there names which result from fantastic suppositions and to which nothing in reality corresponds), or they are names of things which exist, but yet confused and ill-defined, and hastily and irregularly derived from realities. Francis Bacon, Novum Organum, 1939

171 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The theme of the volume is that it is human to have a long childhood which will leave a lifelong residue of emotional immaturity in man.
Abstract: Erik Eriksen is a remarkable individual. He has no college degrees yet is Professor of Human Development at Harvard University. He came to psychology via art, which explains why the reader will find him painting contexts and backgrounds rather than stating dull facts and concepts. He has been a training psychoanalyst for many years as well as a perceptive observer of cultural and social settings and their effect on growing up. This is not just a book on childhood. It is a panorama of our society. Anxiety in young children, apathy in American Indians, confusion in veterans of war, and arrogance in young Nazis are scrutinized under the psychoanalytic magnifying glass. The material is well written and devoid of technical jargon. The theme of the volume is that it is human to have a long childhood which will leave a lifelong residue of emotional immaturity in man. Primitive groups and

4,595 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a theoretical framework for understanding creativity in complex social settings is developed, based on the interactionist model of creative behavior developed by Woodman and Schoenfeldt (1989).
Abstract: In this article we develop a theoretical framework for understanding creativity in complex social settings. We define organizational creativity as the creation of a valuable, useful new product, service, idea, procedure, or process by individuals working together in a complex social system. The starting point for our theoretical development is provided by the interactionist model of creative behavior developed by Woodman and Schoenfeldt (1989). This model and supporting literature on creative behavior and organizational innovation are used to develop an interactional framework for organizational creativity. The theoretical framework is summarized by three propositions that can effectively guide the development of testable hypotheses.

3,904 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Apres une definition du concept de creativite est effectuee une revue de la litterature consacree au developpement de l'innovation dans la reussite professionnelle, mettant l'accent sur l'integration and la reorganisation des structures cognitives as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Apres une definition du concept de creativite est effectuee une revue de la litterature consacree au developpement de l'innovation dans la reussite professionnelle, mettant l'accent sur l'integration et la reorganisation des structures cognitives

1,617 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Work Preference Inventory (WPI) as discussed by the authors is designed to assess individual differences in intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations, and it has meaningful factor structures, adequate internal consistency, good short-term test-retest reliability, and good longer term stability.
Abstract: The Work Preference Inventory (WPI) is designed to assess individual differences in intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations. Both the college student and the working adult versions aim to capture the major elements of intrinsic motivation (self-determination, competence, task involvement, curiosity, enjoyment, and interest) and extrinsic motivation (concerns with competition, evaluation, recognition, money or other tangible incentives, and constraint by others). The instrument is scored on two primary scales, each subdivided into 2 secondary scales. The WPI has meaningful factor structures, adequate internal consistency, good short-term test-retest reliability, and good longer term stability. Moreover, WPI scores are related in meaningful ways to other questionnaire and behavioral measures of motivation, as well as personality characteristics, attitudes, and behaviors.

1,287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors integrate psychological and sociological descriptions of creativity and conformity to present a theory of individual creative action within organizational settings composed of intertwined group, organizational, institutional, and market domains.
Abstract: Creative and habitual actions represent competing behavioral options that may be simultaneously influenced by multiple domains of social action. This article integrates psychological and sociological descriptions of creativity and conformity to present a theory of individual creative action within organizational settings composed of intertwined group, organizational, institutional, and market domains. This theory contributes to the innovation literature by illustrating how intentional action and evolutionary processes that legitimize action interact to facilitate creativity and innovation.

1,180 citations