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Robert Skloot

Bio: Robert Skloot is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin-Madison. The author has contributed to research in topics: Genocide. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 4 publications receiving 6 citations.
Topics: Genocide

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review essay examines several features of Lanzmann's classic film, assessing the tensions between the director's choices in his film and his public statements outside the film.
Abstract: This review essay examines several features of Lanzmann's classic film, assessing the tensions between the director's choices in his film and his public statements outside the film. By employing a perspective taken from live theater and applying it to Lanzmann's treatment of the film's witnesses, and evaluating the structural and thematic influence of the historian Raul Hilberg, the author seeks to define the legacy of the film twenty-five years after its original release.

5 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors illustrate how particular perspectives and disciplinary orientations enhance good teaching and sound learning about rape in war and genocide, and also show how interdisciplinary approaches are necessary for that outcome.
Abstract: Teaching about rape in war and genocide does not fit neatly within the conventional disciplinary boundaries that typically govern curricula and teacher training. The challenge, then, is how to teach in ways that take advantage of disciplinary expertise while still understanding that every disciplinary approach has shortcomings and none will be sufficient alone. This chapter illustrates how particular perspectives and disciplinary orientations enhance good teaching and sound learning about rape in war and genocide. It also shows how interdisciplinary approaches are necessary for that outcome. In addition, the chapter underscores that the teacher’s individual identity and teaching style will greatly affect the impact on students.

1 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors illustrate how particular perspectives and disciplinary orientations enhance good teaching and sound learning about rape in war and genocide, and also show how interdisciplinary approaches are necessary for that outcome.
Abstract: Teaching about rape in war and genocide does not fi t neatly within the conventional disciplinary boundaries that typically govern curricula and teacher training. Th e challenge, then, is how to teach in ways that take advantage of disciplinary expertise while still understanding that every disciplinary approach has shortcomings and none will be sufficient alone. Th is chapter illustrates how particular perspectives and disciplinary orientations enhance good teaching and sound learning about rape in war and genocide. It also shows how interdisciplinary approaches are necessary for that outcome. In addition, the chapter underscores that the teacher's individual identity and teaching style will greatly aff ect the impact on students.
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The authors showed that the gender of teachers and students matters significantly in thinking about who should teach and learn, but the need remains for both men and women to be in the roles of teacher and learner.
Abstract: Who teaches determines what is taught about rape in war and genocide. What, then, qualifies one to teach about this subject? In addition, what considerations about students—their age or background, for instance—are imperative before, during, and after teaching them about rape in war and genocide? How, moreover, may the teacher’s and the student’s gender and experiences affect and problematize teaching and learning about the topic? This chapter shows that the gender of teachers and students matters significantly in thinking about who should teach and learn, but the need remains for both men and women to be in the roles of teacher and learner.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the evolution of the historiography of eighteenth-century Russian education, emphasizing recent shifts in the dominant paradigm of secularization, and identify three wide vect...
Abstract: This essay considers the evolution of the historiography of eighteenth-century Russian education, emphasizing recent shifts in the dominant paradigm of secularization. It identifies three wide vect...

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2019
TL;DR: The authors conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of 142 Slovak theatre reviews published from 2000 to 2017 about 25 Holocaust dramas staged in Slovakia and found that most Holocaust dramas employed the “Brechtian” estrangement effect, but since the beginning of 2015, Slovak theater has shifted towards the use of realistic representation.
Abstract: This article reports findings from a qualitative thematic analysis of 142 Slovak theatre reviews published from 2000 to 2017 about 25 Holocaust dramas staged in Slovakia. Until 2015, most Holocaust dramas employed the “Brechtian” estrangement effect, but since the beginning of 2015, Slovak theatre has shifted towards the use of realistic representation. Dramas employing the estrangement effect were in their reviews considered to be original artworks, and the social value of these plays was emphasized, while realistic representation was considered to be outdated and unoriginal. With the emergence of unoriginality in reviews, the attributed social value of these dramas diminished and the interest of reviewers in the Holocaust drama faded. The subsequent quantitative analysis supports these conclusions.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors presents an overview of the theatrical contributions to understanding and responding to the Holocaust based on the generation-long experience of one author/critic/director, and speculates upon the ways that playwrights can most effectively address the question of how the theatre of the Holocaust will proceed in the future.
Abstract: This essay presents an overview of the theatrical contributions to understanding and responding to the Holocaust based on the generation-long experience of one author/critic/director, and speculates upon the ways that playwrights can most effectively address the question of how the theatre of the Holocaust will proceed in the future. After reviewing the ways traditional theatre is often in conflict with more experimental forms, the author focuses on two crucial concerns of theatre practice (the possibility for hope and the creation of empathy) and provides an example of the kind of theatre that exemplifies the ways that the theatre can be most effective and successful in confronting the Shoah.

3 citations