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Roger W. Smith

Bio: Roger W. Smith is an academic researcher from College of William & Mary. The author has contributed to research in topics: Genocide & Armenian. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 6 publications receiving 161 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17 and exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armen genocide.
Abstract: This article examines Turkish efforts to deny the Armenian genocide of 1915-17. Specifically, it exposes an arrangement by which the government of Turkey has channeled funds into a supposedly objective research institute in the United States, which in turn paid the salary of a historian who served that government in its campaign to discredit scholarship on the Armenian genocide. After a short review of the Armenian genocide and a range of Turkish denial efforts, three documents are reproduced in full. They include a letter that Robert Jay Lifton received from the Turkish Ambassador to the United States, and two documents that were inadvertently included with the Lifton letter—a memorandum to the Turkish Ambassador and a draft letter to Lifton for the Ambassador's signature. After a critical analysis of each document, we discuss the harmful ness of genocide denial and explore why intellectuals might engage in the denial of known genocides. The article concludes with reflections on the relationship between scholars and truth.

57 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This essay explores women's experiences with genocide in terms of participation, forms of victimization, and consequences, focusing on the relationship between women and the perpetration of genocide.
Abstract: Whatever has been written about the history of genocide has been based mainly on the experiences of men. Yet women's experiences with genocide have often differed from those of men in terms of participation, forms of victimization, and consequences. This essay explores these issues, focusing In particular on the relationship between women and the perpetration of genocide.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Shachar as discussed by the authors argued that the adverse possession principle does not work for owners who happen to be large groups in which members disagree, unless the rights holder whose intention is in question is clearly specified (which Shachar does not do in the case of citizenship).
Abstract: evokes the adverse possession principle, which limits the right of a property owner to exclude those who use their property for a sufficient period of time if the owner has not taken action to prevent them from doing so. Thus, those immigrants residing long enough and knowingly to others in the territory of a state have the right to remain. But this analogy seems to falter as well. The principle does not seem to work for owners who happen to be large groups in which members disagree, unless the rights holder whose intention is in question is clearly specified (which Shachar does not do in the case of citizenship). It is not true that all citizens are of the same mind concerning illegal immigration. For example, if the majority of Americans want the government to act on illegal immigration, but the government does not do so to their satisfaction, it seems that adverse possession does not apply. The government’s inaction cannot imply that an individual member or even all of the people ‘‘slept on their rights’’ without intending to claim their property. Shachar’s take on global inequality merits serious attention. Her appeal to the legal duty of each citizen of a well-off society makes her reader relate to the distant needy in a concrete way. No doubt this discourse will offer a fruitful venue for debates on global justice in the years to come, and the additional work that this project requires will be successfully carried out by Shachar and those inspired by her.

1 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The Myths of Modernity: Balzac's Paris, 1830-1848 as mentioned in this paper, is a collection of modernity as break, including representations and materializations of Paris 1848-1870.
Abstract: Introduction: Modernity as Break Part One: Representations: Paris 1830-1848 1. The Myths of Modernity: Balzac's Paris 2. Dreaming the Body Politic: Revolutionary Politics and Utopian Schemes, 1830-1848 Part Two: Materializations: Paris 1848-1870 Prologue 3. The Production of Space 4. Money, Credit and Finance 5. Rent and the Propertied Interest 6. The State 7. Abstract and Concrete Labor 8. The Buying and Selling of Labor Power 9. The Reproduction of Labor Power 10. Consumerism, Spectacle and Leisure 11. Community and Class 12. National Relations 13. Science and Sentiment, Modernity and Tradition 14. Rhetoric and Representation 15. The Geopolitics of Urban Transformation Coda: The Building of the Basilica of Sacre Coeur Notes Bibliography Illustration Credits and Acknowledgements Index

387 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: For example, the authors argues that aversion to labour and desire of the present enjoyment of costly indulgences are perpetual antagonizing principles to the desire of wealth, except those which may be regarded as perpetually antagonising principles.
Abstract: ion of every human passion or motive; except those which may be regarded as perpetually antagonizing principles to the desire of wealth, namely, aversion to labour, and desire of the present enjoyment of costly indulgences. (Mill, 1967a,

204 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on how we can understand the contradictory dynamic through which communications technologies have been domesticated at the same time that domesticity itself has been dislocated.
Abstract: This article focuses on how we can understand the contradictory dynamicsthrough which communications technologies have been domesticated at the same time that domesticity itself has been dislocated. The article addresses questions of historical periodization and the need for a more developed historical perspective on the futurological debates about the new technologies with which so much of media and cultural studies is concerned today.

204 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the history of Orientalism: In the beginning 2. Islam, the West and the rest 3. Orientalism and empire 4. The American century 5. Turmoil in the field 6. After Orientalism?
Abstract: Introduction 1. In the beginning 2. Islam, the West and the rest 3. Orientalism and empire 4. The American century 5. Turmoil in the field 6. Said's Orientalism: a book and its aftermath 7. After Orientalism? Afterword.

177 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In particular, many stories romanticize scientists, inflate the drama of their discoveries, and oversimplify the process of science, which is pseudohistory as mentioned in this paper. But such histories can be flawed.
Abstract: The dangers of pseudoscience – parapsychology, astrology,creationism, etc. – are widely criticized. Lessons in the history of science are oftenviewed as an educational remedy by conveying the nature of science. But such histories canbe flawed. In particular, many stories romanticize scientists, inflate the drama of their discoveries,and oversimplify the process of science. They are, literally and rhetorically, myths.While based on real historical events, they distort the basis of scientific authority and fosterunwarranted stereotypes. Such stories are pseudohistory. Like pseudoscience, they promotefalse ideas about science – in this case, about how science works. Paradoxically, perhaps,the history of pseudosciences may offer an excellent vehicle for remedying such impressions.

125 citations