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Ronny Vollandt

Bio: Ronny Vollandt is an academic researcher from Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. The author has contributed to research in topics: Biblical studies & Semitic languages. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 81 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: The Festschrift as discussed by the authors is a collection of papers in honour of Geoffrey Khan, the Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge, written by his former and current students and post-doctoral re...
Abstract: This Festschrift is a collection of papers in honour of Geoffrey Khan, the Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge, written by his former and current students and post-doctoral re ...

52 citations

MonographDOI
10 Mar 2015
TL;DR: The authors presents a fresh investigation into Arabic versions of the Pentateuch, focusing on the emergence, characteristics, and historical-cultural backdrop of Arabic translations of the Holy Book of the Bible.
Abstract: The history of biblical translations in Arabic— their emergence, characteristics, and historical-cultural backdrop — still remains largely uncharted. This book presents a fresh investigation into Arabic versions of the Pentateuch.

15 citations

01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: Scholarship of the Arabic Bible now has considerable momentum, but must continue to keep its fundamental resource – that of manuscripts – in the foreground of research.
Abstract: The aim of this contribution is to review some of the major areas of current research on the Arabic Bible, along with the factors and trends contributing to them. Also we present some of the tools that are currently under development in the Biblia Arabica team, Munich. We provide here a very condensed survey of the transmission of traditions, as well as ways that biblical manuscripts in Arabic have been analysed and classified, covering both Old Testament/ Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Overall, the lack of critical editions for Arabic biblical texts in general reflects not just the overwhelming number of versions and manuscripts, but also the fundamental challenge these translations present on the level of textuality. Standard paradigms of authorship and transmission break down in the face of the complex reuse, revision, and layering of paratexts seen in these texts. It is the careful study of manuscripts, not simply as texts but also as physical objects, which holds promise for reconstructing the practices of producers and consumers of the Arabic Bible. A union catalogue of Arabic Bible manuscripts will gather the paleographic and codicological information necessary for further research. Moreover, it will link manuscripts, translators, and scribes to the online Bibliography of the Arabic Bible, which is intended to be a comprehensive, classified, and searchable reference tool for secondary literature. In conclusion, scholarship of the Arabic Bible now has considerable momentum, but must continue to keep its fundamental resource – that of manuscripts – in the foreground of research.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The authors reconstructs the mise-en-livre of four Arabic manuscript Bibles, each of them containing a complete set of biblical books, and the workshop that crafted them, which allows for a surprisingly detailed glimpse into the work methods of the scribes and especially the liberties they took with regard to some aspects of transcribing.
Abstract: The present investigation aims at a reconstruction of the mise-en-livre of four Arabic manuscript Bibles, each of them containing a complete set of biblical books, and the workshop that crafted them. Collecting the relevant codicological details—as, for example, the dates given in the colophons, the names of scribes and their characteristic traits, and references to the place of production—makes it possible to distinguish the various steps in production. The combined evidence allows for a surprisingly detailed glimpse into the work methods of the scribes and especially the liberties they took with regard to some aspects of transcribing. In concluding remarks, the question is addressed as to how to explain the practice, which is uncommon in the Christian Arabic context, of binding all biblical books together into one manuscript.

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1986-Language

139 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Xeyoixai et al. show that the poet's anger is most likely connected with love, as irvpl Xe'yofiai (i.e.
Abstract: which appear boldly and effectively in this restricted compass. It is still more notable that the poet's anger_is most likely connected with love, as irvpl Xe'yofiai (i.4) would suggest. (The phrase is different from ^Ac'yo/xai: I agree with L. C. Watson, Arae [1991], 262.) The poem thus belongs to an increasing number of finds from or related to Hellenistic elegy which show what seems a combination of ostensibly personal poetry about love with a series of mythological exempla (P. Oxy. 3723; SH 964). We seem even in this case to be dealing with something less massive than the Lyde or the Leontion; and in these papyrus works, at least, the amatory situation was probably a significant subject of the poetry (note here IXVTJCOVTCU doiSai'...cuc TC nvpl Xeyoixai). The connections with Roman elegy are intriguing. Our poet is palpably conscious of the discords and disparities in the material and the types of poetry he brings together. We should not think of these poems as love-elegy at a more primitive stage in its evolution towards 'subjectivity'. Rather we should observe, in elegy, teasing treatment of professedly personal poetry which offers an interesting parallel to the related but different audacities developed by individual Roman poets. The genre itself is particularly important there: Roman elegists affect a compelling delimitation of elegy, but proceed to play with and break out of those limits. H. ascribes this piece to Hermesianax, on the basis of Paus. 7.18.2. One sees the attraction; but his attempt to reduce the interval in style from Hermes, fr. 7 Powell seems fairly forced. Some slight points on the first column. 8: very difficult, -oc j€ prevents a third-foot caesura; a connective T« with dc would produce a very weak clause. It might be worth remembering that OCT€, unlike oc -re, could be postponed (SH 974.1, cf. Hermes, fr. 7.35 Powell); and that the corruption in the couplet might be more complicated or extensive than the omission of one complete line. 10: H. assumes that x°^9\" iS 'he antecedent of dc; it is much more likely Zeus, so that A toe 8eic]ac is to be preferred. SeiAsuits sinners better than war. 18: one would expect the sense to be rather as in e.g. dAA' dAioV ot] e#ij/ce /Se'Aoc (cf. [Theocr.J 25.236, 239, eToicioc, dyejioiAioc; spacing, and word-end, would be acceptable). 19: ^eiSo/xcu seems a curious verb to use of Athene in relation to Heracles (PMG 933 is of course different); and fxeydXwc would then seem a curious adverb for it.

121 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: This book discusses the life and times of al-Qāsim, the founder of Sunni Islam, and some of his contemporaries, as well as some of the myths and legends surrounding his time.
Abstract: .......................................................................................................................... ii DEDICATION ....................................................................................................................... iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................................................................... v VITA ................................................................................................................................... vi ABBREVIATIONS ................................................................................................................. xi CHRONOLOGY ................................................................................................................... xiii PREFACE ........................................................................................................................... xiv CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1 1.1 The Argument ....................................................................................................................................... 4 1.2 Conventions .......................................................................................................................................... 8 1.3 Defining Terms ................................................................................................................................... 12 CHAPTER 2 – TAḤRĪF IN WESTERN ACADEMIC DISCOURSE ................................................ 14 2.1 With the Weapons of the Enemy ........................................................................................................ 15 2.2 Missionaries and The Moslem World .................................................................................................. 22 2.3 Wissenschaft des Judentums ............................................................................................................... 32 2.4 A Distinction between Taḥrīf al-Maʿnā and Taḥrīf al-Naṣṣ ............................................................... 36 2.5 A Chronology for the Development of Taḥrīf .................................................................................... 43 2.6 Continuing Old Trends ........................................................................................................................ 52 2.7 Challenging the Categories ................................................................................................................. 68 2.8 Building Upon the Challenges ............................................................................................................ 72 2.9 Conclusion .......................................................................................................................................... 73 CHAPTER 3 – THE LIFE AND TIMES OF AL-QĀSIM B. IBRĀHĪM .......................................... 77 3.1 Sources for al-Qāsim’s Biography ...................................................................................................... 78 3.2 Al-Qāsim’s Biography ........................................................................................................................ 81 3.3 Al-Qāsim, Khurūj, and the Zaydī Imamate ......................................................................................... 96

26 citations