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Rowland Simpson

Bio: Rowland Simpson is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Land law. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 175 citations.
Topics: Land law

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30 Apr 1976

175 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the transformation of customary tenure systems and their impact on women's rights to land in Africa is explored, where emphasis is placed on the diversity of land rights within traditional tenure systems, the different institutions and structures (e.g., inheritance, marriage), and the trend toward uniformity and increasing patrilineal control.

436 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The conventional view of traditional or informal systems of African land rights is that they impede agricultural development, and that land titling or registration is needed to encourage land transfers to more productive farmers, improve farmer access to credit, and create incentives for investment in land improvement, soil conservation and new technology as discussed by the authors.

410 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is convincing evidence from around the world that land registration has led to better access to formal credit, higher land values, higher investments in land, and higher output/income as discussed by the authors.

346 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1992-Africa
TL;DR: The distribution of people across the continent is quite uneven as mentioned in this paper, and some of its local densities already count among the world's highest in terms of rain-fed lands, where domestic groups have space for little more than kitchens.
Abstract: Africa is the region with the sparsest overall population, but to infer that Africa has no problems of rural land shortage would be quite wrong. The continent has the highest and fastest-rising rate of population growth—lately over 3 per cent annually—and the distribution of people across the continent is quite uneven. At least as far as rain-fed lands are concerned, some of its local densities already count among the world's highest. Several of its nations—for instance Kenya, Tanzania, and Nigeria—encompass within their borders a full spectrum from range land or desert with fewer than five per square kilometre to better-watered settlements of over 500 per square kilometre, where domestic groups have space for little more than kitchen gardens.

218 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider the legal recognition of customary tenure and identify the circumstances in which a particular model would be most appropriate for a particular situation. But they do not consider the economic theories of property rights, as illustrated by the World Bank's 2003 land policy report.
Abstract: Is there a ‘best practice’ model for the legal recognition of customary tenure? If not, is it possible to identify the circumstances in which a particular model would be most appropriate? This article considers these questions in the light of economic theories of property rights, particularly as illustrated by the World Bank’s 2003 land policy report. While these theories have their flaws, the underlying concept of tenure security allows a typological framework for developing legal responses to customary tenure. In particular, this article suggests that the nature and degree of State legal intervention in a customary land system should be determined by reference to the nature and causes of any tenure insecurity. This hypothesis is discussed by reference to a wide variety of legal examples from Africa, Papua New Guinea and the South Pacific. The objective is not to suggest that law determines resource governance outcomes in pluralist normative environments, but to improve the quality of legal interventions in order to assist customary groups to negotiate better forms of tenure security and access to resources.

193 citations