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Ruth Kircher

Bio: Ruth Kircher is an academic researcher from Fryske Akademy. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ideology & Multilingualism. The author has an hindex of 7, co-authored 15 publications receiving 115 citations. Previous affiliations of Ruth Kircher include Liverpool Hope University & University of Birmingham.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the first empirical investigation of attitudes towards Multicultural London English (MLE), the multiethnolect spoken in England's main metropolis, is presented, based on an online questionnaire.
Abstract: The study presented here is the first empirical investigation of attitudes towards Multicultural London English (MLE), the multiethnolect spoken in England’s main metropolis. An online ques...

25 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article conducted a study with 147 young anglophones, francophones and allophone Montrealers in order to shed light on their attitudes towards English and French in terms of status and solidarity, and found that while the respondents recognized the social desirability of having an affective attachment to the French language, at a more private level, they held more positive attitudes toward English.
Abstract: This paper presents a 2007 study that was conducted amongst 147 young anglophone, francophone and allophone Montrealers in order to shed light on their attitudes towards English and French in terms of status and solidarity. The study made use of both a questionnaire and a matched-guise experiment. The findings indicate that while a certain amount of status was attributed to French, most likely as a result of language policy and planning measures such as Bill 101, significantly more status was attributed to English—most likely a result of the utilitarian value that the language holds as the global lingua franca. Regarding the solidarity dimension, it appears that while the respondents recognised the social desirability of having an affective attachment to the French language, at a more private level, they held more positive attitudes towards English. These can tentatively be explained in terms of the respondents’ social identity. Resume L’article ci-dessous presente une recherche menee en 2007 parmi 147 etudiants montrealais (anglophones, francophones et allophones) qui eut pour objectif d’examiner leurs attitudes envers l’anglais compare au francais en terme de statut et de solidarite. Un questionnaire et une etude des faux-couples furent utilises comme methodes de recherche. Les resultats indiquent qu’un certain statut est attribue au francais, ce qui est probablement une consequence des lois langagieres comme la Loi 101. Neanmoins, un statut plus important est attribue a l’anglais, ce qui est probablement une consequence de sa valeur utilitaire comme lingua franca globale. En ce qui concerne la dimension de la solidarite, bien que les jeunes montrealais semblent conscients de l’importance sociale de se sentir attaches a la langue francaise, lorsque l’on considere un aspect plus personnel, ils tendent a manifester des attitudes plus positives envers l’anglais. Ces attitudes plus positives envers l’anglais peuvent etre expliquees comme resultats de differentes identites sociales.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the results of a study that employed a questionnaire and a matched-guise experiment to investigate the attitudes that Quebec francophones, anglophones and allophones hold towards Quebec French compared to European French are presented.
Abstract: This paper presents the results of a study that employed a questionnaire and a matched-guise experiment to investigate the attitudes that Quebec francophones, anglophones, French-English bilinguals and allophones hold towards Quebec French compared to European French. The findings indicate that attitudes towards Quebec French on the solidarity dimension have improved since the 1980s, while attitudes on the status dimension have remained the same. These findings are interpreted in the context of the burgeoning of Quebecers’ sense of belonging to their society on the one hand, and the tradition of viewing French as a monocentric rather than a pluricentric language on the other hand.

22 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2009

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Feb 2021-Langages
TL;DR: This paper analyzed two corpora (one English: 5,405,947 words, and one Spanish: 525,425 words) consisting of recent Twitter data and examined frequencies, collocations, concordance lines, and larger text segments.
Abstract: Spanish speakers constitute the largest heritage language community in the US. The state of Florida is unusual in that, on one hand, it has one of the highest foreign-born resident rates in the country, most of whom originate from Latin America—but on the other hand, Florida has a comparatively low Spanish language vitality. In this exploratory study of attitudes toward Spanish as a heritage language in Florida, we analyzed two corpora (one English: 5,405,947 words, and one Spanish: 525,425 words) consisting of recent Twitter data. We examined frequencies, collocations, concordance lines, and larger text segments. The results indicate predominantly negative attitudes toward Spanish on the status dimension, but predominantly positive attitudes on the solidarity dimension. Despite the latter, transmission and use of Spanish were found to be affected by pressure to assimilate, and fear of negative societal repercussions. We also found Spanish to be used less frequently than English to tweet about attitudes; instead, Spanish was frequently used to attract Twitter users’ attention to specific links in the language. We discuss the implications of our findings (should they generalize) for the future of Spanish in Florida, and we provide directions for future research.

17 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1878

1,091 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Fishman and Clevedon as discussed by the authors proposed the Reversing Language Shift: Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Assistance to Threatened Languages, which is the foundation of our work.
Abstract: Reversing Language Shift: Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of Assistance to Threatened Languages. Joshua A. Fishman. Multilingual Matters, 76. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 1991. 431 pp.

861 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The second edition of Lippi-Green's book, English with an accent: Language, ideology, and discrimination in the United States, continues the conversation from her 1997 first edition regardin...
Abstract: The second edition of Rosina Lippi-Green's book, English with an accent: Language, ideology, and discrimination in the United States, continues the conversation from her 1997 first edition regardin...

489 citations