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Ryan O’Connor

Bio: Ryan O’Connor is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Product design & Product cost management. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 10 citations.

Papers
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Book ChapterDOI
26 Apr 2011
TL;DR: In the field of modern production contexts, the complexity of processes combined with an increasingly dynamic competitive environment has created, in business management, the need to monitor and analyze, in terms of generation costs, not only the internal production phase but all stages both upstream and downstream in order to minimize the total cost of the product throughout the entire life cycle as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In the field of modern production contexts, the complexity of processes combined with an increasingly dynamic competitive environment has created, in business management, the need to monitor and analyze, in terms of generation costs, not only the internal production phase but all stages both upstream and downstream in order to minimize the total cost of the product throughout the entire life cycle. The approach of life-cycle cost analysis was used primarily as a tool to support investment decisions and complex projects in the field of defence, transportation, the construction sector and other applications where cost constitutes the strategic analysis of cost components of a project throughout its useful life. The analysis methodology of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) concerns the estimate of the cost in monetary terms, originated in all phases of the life of a work, i.e. construction, operation, maintenance and eventual disposal / recovery. The aim is to minimize the combined costs associated with each phase of the life cycle, appropriately discounted, thus providing economic benefits to both the producer and the end user. Life Cycle Costing (LCC) is a tool used in consolidated management accounting (Horngren, 2003, Atkinson et al., 2002), which aims to achieve a reduction in carbon dioxide. Whole life cost. This identifies, with reference to the system, the functional activities within the appropriate stages of design, production, use and disposal of waste, and appropriates a cost (Fabricky Blanchard, 1991) in order to clarify the causal relationship between resulting architecture of product design alternatives and cost estimates of fees, which will probably be supported by the various actors within the economic life of the product [Fixson, 2004]. Life Cycle Costing is an analytical tool and method which belongs to the set of life cycle approach. Traditionally, LCC was used to support purchasing decisions of products or capital equipment involving a large outlay of financial resources (Huppes et al., 2005). In the definition provided by Rebitzer & Hunkeler (2005) LCC incorporates all costs, both internal and external, associated with the life cycle of a product, and are directly related to one or more actors in the supply chain.

10 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An evaluation tool which combines life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC) to support the development of PSS for HECE is articulates.

53 citations

Proceedings Article
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: Product Life Cycle Management addresses the full life cycles of products, from conception until disposal, because systems keep evolving to fit in the market and to benefit from technical capabilities.
Abstract: Product Life Cycle Management addresses the full life cycles of products, from conception until disposal. The creation of the product determines largely what can be done with the product in the later life cycle phases. From business perspective the installed base, all systems that are operational in the field, is an asset that provides many opportunities. From technical perspective the operational life of products is quite a challenge, because systems keep evolving to fit in the market and to benefit from technical capabilities. This creates a variety of operational configurations that have to be served. Distribution This article or presentation is written as part of the Gaudí project. The Gaudí project philosophy is to improve by obtaining frequent feedback. Frequent feedback is pursued by an open creation process. This document is published as intermediate or nearly mature version to get feedback. Further distribution is allowed as long as the document remains complete and unchanged. March 6, 2013 status: preliminary draft version: 0.2 R1 SW R1 HW R1 HW R2 SW R2 SW R2 HW R3 SW R3 HW initial delivery sw upgrade initial delivery sw upgrade R3 SW R2 HW initial delivery R3 SW R3 HW forklift upgrade How long are new functions compatible with older system configurations? When to break compatibility? When does the customer pay for an upgrade? When to retrofit? example Try to run Windows Vista on your 1GB computer from 2005... Figure Of

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 2021-Energies
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of the literature concerning the economic evaluation of the production of perennial crop biomass for energy use is presented, which is probably stimulated by the growing interest in sustainable development, particularly after 2015, when the United Nations declared 17 sustainable development goals.
Abstract: Biomass is widely used for the production of renewable energy, which calls for an economic evaluation of its generation. The aim of the present work was to review the literature concerning the economic evaluation of the production of perennial crop biomass for energy use. Statistical analysis of the bibliographic data was carried out, as well as an assessment of methods and values of economic indicators of the production of perennial crops for bioenergy. Most of the papers selected for the review were published in the years 2015–2019, which was probably stimulated by the growing interest in sustainable development, particularly after 2015, when the United Nations declared 17 sustainable development goals. The earliest articles concerned the economic analysis of plantations of short rotation coppice; the subsequent ones included the analysis of feedstock production in terms of the net present value and policy. The latest references also investigated transport and sustainability issues. The crops most commonly selected for production cost analysis were willow, poplar, and Miscanthus. The cost of production of willow and poplar were similar, 503 EUR ha−1 year−1 and 557 EUR ha−1 year−1, respectively, while the cost of Miscanthus production was significantly higher, 909 EUR ha−1 year−1 on average. By analogy, the distribution of revenue was similar for willow and poplar, at 236 EUR ha−1 year−1 and 181 EUR ha−1 year−1; Miscanthus production reached the value of 404 EUR ha−1 year−1. The economic conditions of perennial crop production differed in terms of geography; four areas were identified: Canada, the USA, southern Europe, and central and northern Europe.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the relevance of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) in public procurement in the European context after the publication of the Directive 2014/24/EU.
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to discuss the relevance of Life Cycle Costing (LCC) in public procurement in the European context after the publication of the Directive 2014/24/EU. After a description of the concept, the dimensions and main features of LCC, the contents of the Directive are briefly presented, focusing on the requirements related to life cycle costing. The main issues related to the assessment of LCC are then discussed, such as discounting and uncertainty of the data, but the paper mostly concentrates on a key-aspect of the methodology: the monetization of environmental externalities, since the Directive emphasizes that this aspect shall also be included in the LCC calculation. Moreover, in order to explore the relevance of LCC in public procurement, a survey to 119 public administrations of different countries has been carried out. The main findings of the survey, presented in our paper, show that the Life Cycle Costing approach is implemented by only a small part of public administrations, in spite of the fact that Green Public Procurement, normally considered as a driver for LCC, is very diffused among the same administrations

9 citations