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S Aravindraj

Bio: S Aravindraj is an academic researcher from VIT University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Epoxy & Fiber. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.
Topics: Epoxy, Fiber

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an experimental investigation on mechanical, vibration, and wear behavior of (aloevera/flax/hemp/wire mesh/BaSO4) laminated composite is presented.
Abstract: These articles presents an experimental investigation on mechanical, vibration, and wear behavior of (aloevera/flax/hemp/wire mesh/BaSO4) laminated composite. The mechanical characterization was pe...

20 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an overview of the concept of vehicle weight reduction, properties required for composite materials to be used for automotive, most commercially used natural fibres and their use for automotive applications focusing on the matrices for the natural fibre composites (NFCs), natural fibre properties and potential challenges coupled with the use of natural fibre, surface modification methods of some natural fiber being used in the automotive industry and recent advancements in textile fibre-reinforced composites.
Abstract: Environmental stringent norms, weight reduction, and the ever-depleting mode of petroleum resources have stimulated the use of textile-based natural fibres as reinforcement in polymeric composites. Natural fibres play a significant role in the sustainability of an environmentally friendly future. Natural fibres-based composites have fulfilled the environmental norms and contribute to developing lightweight materials with improved mechanical properties in the automotive sector. The automotive industry is yielding substantial steps towards a more environmentally friendly product by adopting textile fibres as a reinforcement for making various automotive parts, such as door panels, boot lining, instrument panel support, sun visor, wheel box, interior insulation, trunk panel, roof cover, and bumper. The growth rate of natural fibre production is increasing day by day. Each year, high energy-consuming products and synthetic fibres-based composites are being replaced by natural fibre-reinforced polymeric composites because natural fibre-based composites have excellent mechanical properties, relatively low cost (one-third of the cost of glass fibre), low density, and recyclability. This review analysis contributes an overview of the concept of vehicle weight reduction, properties required for composite materials to be used for automotive, most commercially used natural fibres and their use for automotive applications focusing on the matrices for the natural fibre composites (NFCs), natural fibre properties and potential challenges coupled with the use of natural fibres, surface modification methods of some natural fibres being used in the automotive industry and recent advancements in textile fibre-reinforced composites. Thermal properties and processing techniques of natural fibre-reinforced composites (NFRC) are also studied.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors provide an overview of the bast fibers and their composites, properties enhancement techniques, overall mechanical behaviours and thermal stability with suitable applications for aeronautical, automobile, construction, chemical, and biomedical applications.
Abstract: Composite materials are revolutionizing to realize the demanding needs of aeronautical, automobile, construction, chemical, and biomedical applications. The natural fiber composite is chosen as one of the best choices among composites due to its sustainable goods like eco-friendly nature, better properties and Greenhouse gas (GHG) balance. Furthermore, the bast fiber composites are identified as promising industrial composites based on the availability, strength-to-weight ratio, manufacturing ease, and economics for commercialization. However, product quality and production volume significantly influence commercial adoption of the bast fiber composites. Especially the product quality primarily suffers due to climatic conditions, damage while harvesting, extraction method, retting issues, and extraction location. Consequently, this review aims to provide an overview of the bast fibers & their composites, properties enhancement techniques, overall mechanical behaviours and thermal stability with suitable applications.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance of stainless steel wire mesh-reinforced hydrophilic fiber with epoxy (LY556) and vinyl ester resin was revealed. And the fabricated hybrid composite performances were deliberated through different characterizations such as tensile, hardness, flexural, wear, impact, water absorption and oil absorption as per ASTM standards.
Abstract: Natural fibers become one of the inevitable materials in engineering applications, and they gain popularity among engineers, researchers, and scientists due to their remarkable properties. This paper reveals the performance of stainless steel (SS) wire mesh-reinforced hydrophilic fiber with epoxy (LY556) and vinyl ester resin. Eight different types (H1 to H4 and F1 to F4) of hybrid composites were fabricated with hemp and flax fiber using hand layup technique. The fabricated hybrid composite performances were deliberated through different characterizations such as tensile, hardness, flexural, wear, impact, water absorption and oil absorption as per ASTM standards. The tensile test results depict that hemp/epoxy composite (H2) with wire mesh reinforcement shows 23.4% higher strength than H1 composite; likewise, hemp/vinyl ester composite H4 shows 13.7% higher strength than H3 composite. The flexural strength of the F2 composite has been found to be 11.9% higher than the F1 composite; similarly, composite F4 shows 32.1% higher strength than the F3 composite. The water absorption test clearly indicates that the composites with wire mesh (H2, H4, F2, and F4) absorbs a minimum percentage (29.5% to 31.8%) of water than the composite without wire mesh. The wear analysis shows that the H2 composite requires minimum frictional force (21.6%) than H3 composite. The obtained SEM image confirms the cup and cone fracture of wire mesh, brittle fracture of the matrix, and no evidence of debonding between matrix and wire mesh in the composites.

6 citations