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S. Thobeka Gumede

Bio: S. Thobeka Gumede is an academic researcher from University of KwaZulu-Natal. The author has contributed to research in topics: Ecology & Biodiversity. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 5 publications receiving 10 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper reviewed case studies of vertebrate species' responses to urbanisation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to determine trends and presented a novel modification to the final of three phases of the framework described by Evans et al. (2010).
Abstract: Urbanisation is rapidly transforming natural landscapes with consequences for biodiversity. Little is documented on the response of African wildlife to urbanisation. We reviewed case studies of vertebrate species' responses to urbanisation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to determine trends. Connected habitat mosaics of natural and anthropogenic green spaces are critical for urban wildlife persistence. We present a novel modification to the final of three phases of the framework described by Evans et al. (2010), which documents this sequence for vertebrate species persistence, based on the perspective of our research. Species in suburbia exhibit an initial phase where behavioural and ecological flexibility, life-history traits and phenotypic plasticity either contribute to their success, or they stay at low numbers. Where successful, the next phase is a rapid increase in populations and distribution; anthropogenic food resources and alternate breeding sites are effectively exploited. The modified third phase either continues to spread, plateau or decline.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors found that people who were heavily reliant on natural resources attained a higher LEK score, indicating a greater breadth of ecological knowledge, which in turn shaped their perceptions of environmental change.

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of this study showed that Common Mynas prefer glucose, especially at ~ 10% concentration, and these results on sugar type and preference of Common Myna might contribute to preventing or managing their spread in South Africa.
Abstract: Nectarivorous and frugivorous birds have been found to select their diet according to sugar type and concentration. Consequently, many studies of sugar preference have been conducted on various avian species. Common Mynas, Sturnus tristis, previously known as Acridotheres tristis, are considered amongst the 100 worst invasive species worldwide and damage fruit crops in some countries. However, their sugar preferences have never been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effect of sugar type and concentration on sugar preference and assimilation efficiency in Common Mynas (n = 7). Birds were given pairwise choice tests of sugars (fructose, sucrose and glucose) of 5 g/ml (5%) to test sugar preference. Common Mynas showed preference for glucose over fructose and sucrose. To determine at which concentrations they prefer glucose, they were offered three different concentrations of glucose (5, 10 and 25%). They showed distinct preference for the 10% concentration of glucose in comparison with 5% and 25% glucose nectars. The birds maintained body mass in the respective experimental trials thus showed sufficient energy intake. Common Mynas failed to digest and absorb sucrose, but fructose and glucose were digested and assimilated efficiently for all concentrations. Results of this study showed that Common Mynas prefer glucose, especially at ~ 10% concentration. Species distribution is determined by food resources, and these results on sugar type and preference of Common Mynas might contribute to preventing or managing their spread in South Africa.

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Feb 2020-Ostrich
TL;DR: The macronutrient preferences of Common Mynas in captivity suggest the Common Myna will continue to be distributed mainly in urban areas of South Africa where anthropogenic foods relatively high in fat are more common.
Abstract: Common Mynas Sturnus tristis, previously known as Acridotheres tristis, are considered among the world’s worst most invasive species. However, relatively little is known about the factors that affe...

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used camera-trap surveys and microhabitat-scale covariates to assess the habitat requirements, probability of occupancy and detection of two terrestrial forest specialist species, the Orange Ground-thrushGeokichla gurneyi and the Lemon DoveAplopelia larvataduring the breeding and non-breeding seasons of 2018-2019 in selected Southern Mistbelt Forests of KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Abstract: Establishing the specific habitat requirements of forest specialists in fragmented natural habitats is vital for their conservation. We used camera-trap surveys and microhabitat-scale covariates to assess the habitat requirements, probability of occupancy and detection of two terrestrial forest specialist species, the Orange Ground-thrushGeokichla gurneyiand the Lemon DoveAplopelia larvataduring the breeding and non-breeding seasons of 2018–2019 in selected Southern Mistbelt Forests of KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A series of camera-trap surveys over 21 days were conducted in conjunction with surveys of microhabitat structural covariates. During the wet season, percentage of leaf litter cover, short grass cover, short herb cover, tall herb cover and saplings 0–2 m, stem density of trees 6–10 m and trees 16–20 m were significant structural covariates for influencing Lemon Dove occupancy. In the dry season, stem density of 2–5 m and 10–15 m trees, percentage tall herb cover, short herb cover and 0–2 m saplings were significant covariates influencing Lemon Dove occupancy. Stem density of trees 2–5 m and 11–15 m, percentage of short grass cover and short herb cover were important site covariates influencing Orange Ground-thrush occupancy in the wet season. Our study highlighted the importance of a diverse habitat structure for both forest species. A high density of tall/mature trees was an essential microhabitat covariate, particularly for sufficient cover and food for these ground-dwelling birds. Avian forest specialists play a vital role in providing ecosystem services perpetuating forest habitat functioning. Conservation of the natural heterogeneity of their habitat is integral to management plans to prevent the decline of such species.

3 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: A review of the current knowledge on terrestrial vertebrate invasions in South Africa can be found in this paper, where the authors consider the importance that the NEM:BA Alien and Invasive Species Regulations have had on the research of invasive terrestrial vertebrates and emphasise the importance of regulations for domestic exotics.
Abstract: In this chapter we review the current knowledge on terrestrial vertebrate invasions in South Africa. Thirty species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians are considered to have arrived over the last 10,000 years, with two thirds having become invasive in the last 150 years. Half of the species are mammals, a third birds, with three reptiles and two amphibians. Although there are multiple pathways, there appears to be a trend from species that were deliberately introduced in the past, to accidental introductions in the last ~100 years, which are a by-product of increasing trade, both internationally and within South Africa. Few invasive terrestrial vertebrate species have had their impacts formally assessed within South Africa, but international assessments suggest that many can have Moderate or Major environmental and socio-economic impacts. Of particular concern is the growing demand for alien pets within the region, with increasing amounts of escapees being encountered in the wild. We consider the importance that the NEM:BA Alien and Invasive Species Regulations have had on the research of invasive terrestrial vertebrates in South Africa, and emphasise the importance of regulations for domestic exotics.

29 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore examples of animal control projects, their resourcing and degree of success or failure in South Africa, and highlight the role of inter-institutional working groups in promoting the success of invasive alien species management.
Abstract: South Africa has a rich history of managing invasive alien animal populations. This chapter explores examples of animal control projects, their resourcing and degree of success or failure. Out of 1023 alien animal species present in South Africa, 80 are designated for compulsory control or eradication in national legislation, and 24 are currently being controlled with the aim of eradication or containment. Only two species have been successfully eradicated from mainland SA and its near-shore islands: Otala punctata (the Freckled Edible Snail) and Trogoderma granarium (the Khapra Beetle). These two projects took place in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and were rapid responses by small groups of role players to small infestations. In contrast, most current projects are larger, involving complex stakeholder management and considerable technical complexity. Three further invertebrate species are currently controlled through integrated pest management (Bactrocera dorsalis, the Oriental Fruit Fly) or nest removal (Vespula germanica, the German Wasp and Polistes dominula, the European Paper Wasp). No marine species are currently subject to control. Among vertebrates, 12 freshwater fish species have been controlled in localised areas, according to their specific listing in legislation and protected area management priorities; two amphibian, two bird and five mammal species are currently subject to control using a wide variety of techniques. Inter-institutional working groups have played a significant role in promoting the success of invasive alien species management in South Africa. Three working groups are actively addressing new and existing invasions, and promoting awareness and cooperation among a wide range of organisations, as well as recording the experience and learning of these groups.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Apr 2021-Ostrich
TL;DR: In Africa, increasing human populations and anthropogenic land-use change are generally affecting diversity negatively as mentioned in this paper, but especially in Africa, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, a large number of people are migrating to the region.
Abstract: Globally, but especially in Africa, increasing human populations and anthropogenic land-use change are generally affecting diversity negatively. Urban environments in southern Africa typically comp...

14 citations