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S. Vijayarangan

Bio: S. Vijayarangan is an academic researcher from Indian Institute of Technology Madras. The author has contributed to research in topics: Composite number & Non-circular gear. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 5 publications receiving 81 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Lagrangian multiplier technique was used to study the contact stresses of a pair of mating gear teeth, under static conditions, by using a two-dimensional finite element method.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a static stress analysis of composite gears using a three-dimensional finite element approach is presented, and it is concluded that graphite material such as graphite/epoxy can be thought of as a material for power transmission gears.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the performance of composite material helical gears was compared with that of carbon steel helical gear using a three-dimensional finite element method and the safety factor obtained based on the root stress values for the two orthotropic material materials was very favourable.

20 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the performance of two composite material bevel gears is compared with a carbon steel gear from a static strength and displacement point of view, and it is concluded that composite materials such as boron/epoxy can be very much thought of as a material for power transmission bevel gear.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the performance of gears made of metal matrix composite (MMC) materials with that of conventional steel material gears is compared. And it is concluded from this study that MMC materials are highly suitable for making gears that are to transmit even fairly large power.

10 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a formulation and solution technique using genetic algorithms (GA) for design optimization of composite leaf springs is presented, where the optimum dimensions of a composite leaf spring have been obtained, which contributes towards achieving the minimum weight with adequate strength and stiffness.

138 citations

01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, a single leaf with variable thickness and width for constant cross sectional area of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) with similar mechanical and geometrical properties to the multileaf spring, was designed, fabricated (hand-lay up technique) and tested.
Abstract: The automobile industry has shown increased interest in the replacement of steel spring with fiberglass composite leaf spring due to high strength to weight ratio. Therefore; the aim of this paper is to present a low cost fabrication of complete mono composite leaf spring and mono composite leaf spring with bonded end joints. Also, general study on the analysis and design. A single leaf with variable thickness and width for constant cross sectional area of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) with similar mechanical and geometrical properties to the multileaf spring, was designed, fabricated (hand-lay up technique) and tested. Computer algorithm using C-language has been used for the design of constant cross-section leaf spring. The results showed that an spring width decreases hyperbolically and thickness increases linearly from the spring eyes towards the axle seat. The finite element results using ANSYS software showing stresses and deflections were verified with analytical and experimental results. The design constraints were stresses (Tsai-Wu failure criterion) and displacement. Compared to the steel spring, the composite spring has stresses that are much lower, the natural frequency is higher and the spring weight is nearly 85 % lower with bonded end joint and with complete eye unit.

119 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of structural properties of discontininuous metal matrix composites is presented, with an emphasis on the need for an improved understanding of damage tolerance characteristics in these materials and the associated potential for development offracture resistant discontinuous metal composite materials highlighted.
Abstract: Discontinuous metal matrix composites (i.e. short fibre and particle reinforced materials) have attained a significant degree of scientific and technological maturity as advanced structural materials. Initial commercialisation has been achieved, with the unique combinations of mechanical and physical properties afforded by metal-ceramic systems proving appropriate for a variety of structural and semistructural applications. In recent years there has been important consolidation in the understanding of basic structural properties in such composites, which are addressed in the present review. The outstanding requirement for an improved understanding of damage tolerance characteristics in these materials is particularly noted. ‘Mesoscopic’ materials architectures (e.g. laminated and functionally graded materials) are also discussed, and the associated potential for development offracture resistant discontinuous metal composite materials highlighted.

101 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Lagrange multiplier algorithm has been used between the contacting pairs to determine the contact stresses among the helical gear pairs, under static conditions, by using a 3D finite element method.

70 citations

01 Oct 2004
TL;DR: It is shown here how different types of materials have different properties and how these properties can be modified over time to suit different uses.
Abstract: ................................................................................................................... III TABLE OF CONTENTS................................................................................................IV LIST OF FIGURES ......................................................................................................VII LIST OF TABLES ..........................................................................................................IX Nomenclature.................................................................................................................... X Chapter

39 citations