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Sachin Kumar

Bio: Sachin Kumar is an academic researcher from SRM University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Antenna (radio) & Ground plane. The author has an hindex of 16, co-authored 118 publications receiving 1007 citations. Previous affiliations of Sachin Kumar include Kyungpook National University & Ambedkar Institute of Advanced Communication Technologies and Research.

Papers published on a yearly basis

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an introduction and evolution of DGS and how DGS is different from former technologies: PBG and EBG, and several theoretical techniques for analysing the Defected Ground Structure are discussed.
Abstract: Slots or defects integrated on the ground plane of microwave planar circuits are referred to as Defected Ground Structure. DGS is adopted as an emerging technique for improving the various parameters of microwave circuits, that is, narrow bandwidth, cross-polarization, low gain, and so forth. This paper presents an introduction and evolution of DGS and how DGS is different from former technologies: PBG and EBG. A basic concept behind the DGS technology and several theoretical techniques for analysing the Defected Ground Structure are discussed. Several applications of DGS in the field of filters, planar waveguides, amplifiers, and antennas are presented.

273 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an ultra-compact two-port MIMO antenna working in the frequency range of 3.1-10.6 GHz with dual band-notched characteristics is presented.
Abstract: In this paper, an ultra-compact two-port MIMO antenna working in the frequency range of 3.1–10.6 GHz with dual band-notched characteristics is presented. The MIMO antenna consists of two identical octagonal-shaped radiating elements placed adjacent to each other with a connected ground plane. The overall size of the proposed two-port UWB-MIMO antenna is 19 × 30 × 0.8 mm3. In the ground plane of antenna elements, a T-shaped stub is introduced to create band-notch at 5.5 GHz. Also, an open-ended half-guided-wavelength resonator slot is introduced along the upper edge of the octagonal radiator to obtain a broader notched-band (4.37–5.95 GHz). The second band-notch is created around 7 GHz (6.52–7.45 GHz) by etching another open-ended slot from the radiating patch. The two-notch bands reject interference due to HiperLAN, WiMAX, INSAT/Super-extended C-band, downlink of X-band satellite communication and RFID service bands. A pair of L-shaped slits are introduced in the feed line to improve impedance matching, for the frequency band available between the two notches. The proposed design is fabricated on an FR-4 substrate and minimum isolation greater than 18 dB (a major portion >22 dB) and envelope correlation coefficient (ECC) less than 0.13 are obtained. The antenna gain varies in the range of 1.2–2.91 dBi with a variation of 1.71 dBi only. A radiation efficiency, greater than 70% is achieved throughout the operating frequency band.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a four-port MIMO antenna design focused on the sub-6 GHz fifth generation wireless communication application is presented, which does not need any other decoupling structure for achieving isolation between multiple ports.
Abstract: A four-port MIMO antenna design focused on the sub-6 GHz fifth generation wireless communication application is presented. The design does not need any other decoupling structure for achieving isolation between multiple ports. A combination of four single wideband antenna units results in the formation of a circular-shaped metallic disc in the ground plane of the proposed antenna. This disc acts as a pool of current with 180° phase difference leading to isolation between various ports. Diversity performance of the antenna is shown with the help of an envelope correlation coefficient using both S-parameter and far-field data. The radiation pattern of the proposed antenna has four lobes in four quadrants for proper reception of signals from different directions. A prototype of the designed antenna is fabricated and measured successfully.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a wide band Microstrip antenna with defected ground structure is proposed for Ku band applications with a circular shape defect integrated in the ground plane, which has an impedance bandwidth of 56.67% ranging from 9.8 GHz to 17.55 GHz.
Abstract: A wide band Microstrip antenna is proposed for Ku band applications with defected ground structure. A circular shape defect is integrated in the ground plane. A novel equivalent circuit model is proposed for Microstrip patch antenna with defected ground structure. Accurate design equations are presented for the wideband Microstrip antenna and theoretical analysis is done for the proposed structure. The proposed antenna has an impedance bandwidth of 56.67% ranging from 9.8 GHz to 17.55 GHz, which covers Ku-band and partially X-band. The antenna shows good radiation characteristics within the entire band, and has a gain ranging from 5 dBi to 12.08 dBi. Minimum isolation between co-polar and cross-polarization level of 20 dB and 15 dB is achieved in H-plane and E-plane respectively. The simulation of the proposed antenna is done on HFSS v.14, and measured results of fabricated antenna are in good agreement with the theoretical and simulated results.

60 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an introduction and evolution of DGS and how DGS is different from former technologies: PBG and EBG, and several theoretical techniques for analysing the Defected Ground Structure are discussed.
Abstract: Slots or defects integrated on the ground plane of microwave planar circuits are referred to as Defected Ground Structure. DGS is adopted as an emerging technique for improving the various parameters of microwave circuits, that is, narrow bandwidth, cross-polarization, low gain, and so forth. This paper presents an introduction and evolution of DGS and how DGS is different from former technologies: PBG and EBG. A basic concept behind the DGS technology and several theoretical techniques for analysing the Defected Ground Structure are discussed. Several applications of DGS in the field of filters, planar waveguides, amplifiers, and antennas are presented.

273 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that the mutual-coupling reduction methods inspired by MTM and MTS concepts can provide a higher level of isolation between neighbouring radiating elements using easily realizable and cost-effective decoupling configurations that have negligible consequence on the array’s characteristics such as bandwidth, gain and radiation efficiency, and physical footprint.
Abstract: Nowadays synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) antenna systems with the capability to radiate waves in more than one pattern and polarization are playing a key role in modern telecommunication and radar systems. This is possible with the use of antenna arrays as they offer advantages of high gain and beamforming capability, which can be utilized for controlling radiation pattern for electromagnetic (EM) interference immunity in wireless systems. However, with the growing demand for compact array antennas, the physical footprint of the arrays needs to be smaller and the consequent of this is severe degradation in the performance of the array resulting from strong mutual-coupling and crosstalk effects between adjacent radiating elements. This review presents a detailed systematic and theoretical study of various mutual-coupling suppression (decoupling) techniques with a strong focus on metamaterial (MTM) and metasurface (MTS) approaches. While the performance of systems employing antenna arrays can be enhanced by calibrating out the interferences digitally, however it is more efficient to apply decoupling techniques at the antenna itself. Previously various simple and cost-effective approaches have been demonstrated to effectively suppress unwanted mutual-coupling in arrays. Such techniques include the use of defected ground structure (DGS), parasitic or slot element, dielectric resonator antenna (DRA), complementary split-ring resonators (CSRR), decoupling networks, P.I.N or varactor diodes, electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structures, etc. In this review, it is shown that the mutual-coupling reduction methods inspired By MTM and MTS concepts can provide a higher level of isolation between neighbouring radiating elements using easily realizable and cost-effective decoupling configurations that have negligible consequence on the array’s characteristics such as bandwidth, gain and radiation efficiency, and physical footprint.

226 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Different MIMO antenna design techniques and all of their mutual coupling reduction techniques through various structures and mechanisms are presented with multiple examples and characteristics comparison.
Abstract: In recent years, multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) antennas with the ability to radiate waves in more than one pattern and polarization play a great role in modern telecommunication systems. This paper provides a theoretical review of different mutual coupling reduction techniques in MIMO antenna systems. The increase in the mutual coupling can affect the antenna characteristics drastically and therefore degrades the performance of the MIMO systems. It is possible to improve the performance partially by calibrating the mutual coupling in the digital domain. However, the simple and effective approach is to use the techniques, such as defected ground structure, parasitic or slot element, complementary split ring resonator, and decoupling networks which can overcome the mutual coupling effects by means of physical implementation. An extensive discussion on the basis of different mutual coupling reduction techniques, their examples, and comparative study is still rare in the literature. Therefore, in this paper, different MIMO antenna design techniques and all of their mutual coupling reduction techniques through various structures and mechanisms are presented with multiple examples and characteristics comparison.

197 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A benchmark is set in order to provide a deep comparison between different WPT systems according to different criteria: compensation topologies; resonator structures with misalignment effects; and, electromagnetic field (EMF) diagnostics and electromagnetic field interference (EMI), including the WPT-related standards and EMI and EMF reduction methods.
Abstract: Magnetically coupled resonance wireless power transfer systems (MCR WPT) have been developed in recent years. There are several key benefits of such systems, including dispensing with power cords, being able to charge multiple devices simultaneously, and having a wide power range. Hence, WPT systems have been used to supply the power for many applications, such as electric vehicles (EVs), implantable medical devices (IMDs), consumer electronics, etc. The literature has reported numerous topologies, many structures with misalignment effects, and various standards related to WPT systems; they are usually confusing and difficult to follow. To provide a clearer picture, this paper aims to provide comprehensive classifications for the recent contributions to the current state of MCR WPT. This paper sets a benchmark in order to provide a deep comparison between different WPT systems according to different criteria: (1) compensation topologies; (2) resonator structures with misalignment effects; and, (3) electromagnetic field (EMF) diagnostics and electromagnetic field interference (EMI), including the WPT-related standards and EMI and EMF reduction methods. Finally, WPT systems are arranged according to the application type. In addition, a WPT case study is proposed, an algorithm design is given, and experiments are conducted to validate the results obtained by simulations.

108 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The need for flexible antennas, materials, and processes used for fabricating the antennas, various material properties influencing antenna performance, and specific biomedical applications accompanied by the design considerations are focused on.
Abstract: The field of flexible antennas is witnessing an exponential growth due to the demand for wearable devices, Internet of Things (IoT) framework, point of care devices, personalized medicine platform, 5G technology, wireless sensor networks, and communication devices with a smaller form factor to name a few. The choice of non-rigid antennas is application specific and depends on the type of substrate, materials used, processing techniques, antenna performance, and the surrounding environment. There are numerous design innovations, new materials and material properties, intriguing fabrication methods, and niche applications. This review article focuses on the need for flexible antennas, materials, and processes used for fabricating the antennas, various material properties influencing antenna performance, and specific biomedical applications accompanied by the design considerations. After a comprehensive treatment of the above-mentioned topics, the article will focus on inherent challenges and future prospects of flexible antennas. Finally, an insight into the application of flexible antenna on future wireless solutions is discussed.

101 citations