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Sally Ashton-Hay

Bio: Sally Ashton-Hay is an academic researcher from Southern Cross University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Higher education & Experiential learning. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 28 publications receiving 288 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: This paper used classroom action research to identify, investigate, apply solutions to, and report on results and make recommendations about how to improve teaching strategies and educational policy, and evaluated the effect of introducing special methods, materials, and activities to make attitudes more positive.
Abstract: Most members of the language teaching profession realize that their students’ learning potential increases when attitudes are positive and motivation runs high. The research into the connection between positive attitudes and successfully learning a second language supports this simple observation, although it is important to understand that many variables are involved because we are dealing with complex social and psychological aspects of human behavior. For example, students’ ability to learn a second language can be influenced by their attitudes towards the target language, the target language speakers and their culture, the social value of learning the second language, and also the students’ attitudes towards themselves as members of their own culture (Ellis 1994). In addition, English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers should recognize that all students possess positive and negative attitudes in varying degrees, and that the negative ones can be changed by thoughtful instructional methods, such as using materials and activities that help students achieve an “understanding and appreciation of the foreign culture” (Brown 2000, 181). This article will describe some of the research about attitudes, motivation, and language learning; it will then discuss a project that examined educational factors that affect motivation and evaluated the effect of introducing special methods, materials, and activities to make attitudes more positive. The project utilized classroom action research, which is a useful method with clearly defined stages to allow teachers to identify, investigate, apply solutions to, and report on results and make recommendations about how to improve teaching strategies and educational policy.

53 citations

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the benefits of using drama as a teaching strategy, its power to engage all learning styles and offer some practical classroom teaching activities which incorporate various learning styles in English as a foreign or second language.
Abstract: Drama is highly regarded as an effective and valuable teaching strategy because of its unique ability to engage reflective, constructivist and active learning in the classroom as well as enhancing oral skills development (Di Pietro, 1987; Via, 1976; Heathcote cited in Wagner, 1976; Mezirow, 1990; Schon, 1991; Donato and McCormick, 1994; Lukinsky, 1990; Miccoli, 2003). As teachers, we often search for effective ways to improve our classes, motivate the students that we teach and appeal to a range of learning styles. This paper will discuss some of the benefits of using drama as a teaching strategy, its power to engage all learning styles and offer some practical classroom teaching activities which incorporate various learning styles in English as a foreign or second language. Teachers are encouraged to try some of these strategies and provide a more active and engaging learning experience for students in the classroom.

38 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a pre-departure curriculae for Asian students when studying at Western universities is described, and the diverse range of academic, social and cultural challenges experienced by Asian students are discussed.
Abstract: The diverse range of academic, social and cultural challenges experienced by Asian students when studying at Western universities is well documented. This research involved a pre-departure curricul...

22 citations

04 May 2006
TL;DR: The notion of 'powerful' is emphasized in contrast to 'weak' learning environments where students are mainly required to digest or memorize facts as discussed by the authors, which constitutes contrasting views of education depending on whether students are required to respond, engage and participate in their learning experiences or remain passive and inactive as in more traditional behaviorist learning situations.
Abstract: Recent educational reforms have been gaining increasing attention across Europe, particularly for the creation of powerful learning environments (Buchberger, 2001; Gerjets & Hesse, 2005; Lesgold, 2004; Palincsar & Herrenkohl, 2002; Van Petegem, De Loght, & Shortridge, 2003) based on constructivist educational theory. Most of these innovations are responses to raising educational standards and creating more engaged, active learners. Powerful learning environments aim to improve the quality of learning experiences by creating more active, student-centered classrooms in schools and universities, particularly through the use of technology. The notion of 'powerful' is emphasized in contrast to 'weak' learning environments where students are mainly required to digest or memorize facts. This constitutes contrasting views of education depending on whether students are required to respond, engage and participate in their learning experiences or remain passive and inactive as in more traditional behaviorist learning situations. Such contrasting views of education are one of the reasons for the increased interest in what powerful learning environments have to offer and what they mean in terms of educational reform.

19 citations


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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: Second language acquisition research has been extensively studied in the literature as discussed by the authors, with a focus on second language acquisition in the context of English as a Second Language Learning (ESL) programs.
Abstract: Acknowledgements Introduction PART ONE - BACKGROUND Introduction 1. Second language acquisition research: an overview PART TWO - THE DESCRIPTION OF LEARNER LANGUAGE Introduction 2. Learner errors and error analysis 3. Developmental patterns: order and sequence in second language acquisition 4. Variability in learner language 5. Pragmatic aspects of learner language PART THREE - EXPLAINING SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: EXTERNAL FACTORS Introduction 6. Social factors and second language acquisition 7. Input and interaction and second language acquisition PART FOUR - EXPLAINING SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: INTERNAL FACTORS Introduction 8. Language transfer 9. Cognitive accounts of second language acquisition 10. Linguistic universals and second language acquisition PART FIVE - EXPLAINING INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION Introduction 11. Individual learner differences 12. Learning strategies PART SIX - CLASSROOM SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION Introduction 13. Classroom interaction and second language acquisition 14. Formal instruction and second language acquisition PART SEVEN - CONCLUSION Introduction 15. Data, theory, and applications in second language acquisition research Glossary Bibliography Author index Subject index

981 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Anne Brockbank and Ian McGill discuss the importance of reflective learning in higher education and propose a framework to facilitate reflective learning for higher education, which they call Facilitating reflective Learning in Higher Education (FLHE).
Abstract: Facilitating reflective learning in higher education, 2 nd ed., by Anne Brockbank and Ian McGill, Maidenhead, McGraw Hill and Open University Press (Society for Research into Higher Education),2007...

229 citations