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Samantha Bennett

Bio: Samantha Bennett is an academic researcher from University of Plymouth. The author has contributed to research in topics: Interpretative phenomenological analysis & Higher education. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 27 citations.

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TL;DR: This article explored how the qualitative lived experience of dyslexia was implicated in degree choice and found that the influence of school and family, influence of education, and having a passion for art were three superordinate themes.
Abstract: Increasing numbers of students in Higher Education (HE) have dyslexia and are particularly over represented in the visual and creative arts. While dyslexia has been associated with artistic talent, some applicants may perceive their academic opportunities as limited because of negative learning experiences associated with their dyslexia. This study explored how the qualitative lived experience of dyslexia was implicated in degree choice. Transcripts of semi-structured interviews with 13 arts students provided data for an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three superordinate themes emerged which can be described under the broad headings: (1) Influence of school and family, (2) Dyslexia as a strength, (3) Having a passion for art. The data from eight students clearly suggested that they had actively chosen to study art because of a long standing interest and acknowledged talent. The others had perceived their academic options as otherwise limited. However, for all participants, studying and practisi...

31 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: Ade Adipetan MBE was a bronze medallist in the 2004 Olympics and used callipers to enable him to function in the 'World of Normal People'. At the age of 12 two physiotherapists spotted him flying down the road with his mates pushing him in a Tesco trolley.
Abstract: Ade Adipetan MBE was a bronze medallist in the 2004 Olympics. He is one of the most athletic, talented, ambitious and charismatic people in Britain. Ade uses a wheelchair. Until the age of 12 Ade was adapting himself. With the well-meaning help of health professionals, he used callipers to enable him to function in the 'World of Normal People'. At the age of 12 two physiotherapists spotted him flying down the road with his mates pushing him in a Tesco's trolley. They didn't see a young black guy with a disability; they saw a potential athlete who would obviously be an asset to a team. Where would he be now if he hadn't been spotted by those two physios? What chance did he stand growing up in East London as a young black guy with a disability? The odds were stacked against him.

55 citations

Book
18 Oct 2017
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify six key reasons explaining the social phenomenon that many practitioners find it so difficult to make a living in the arts by applying two acknowledged analysis tools in strategic business management.
Abstract: This study identifies six key reasons explaining the social phenomenon that many practising fine artists find it so difficult to make a living in the arts. Due to a marked paucity of research explaining this social phenomenon, the study at hand investigates the internal factors related to artists’ personality, motivation, and skills as well as various external factors influencing artists’ working and business environment by applying two acknowledged analysis tools in strategic business management. The literature findings highlight four external threat factors mainly responsible for a very challenging working and business environment affecting practising fine artists’ chances of professional success. Consequently, two internal factors – notably artists’ motivation and ambition to conduct business and a living in the arts as well as their developed skills – turn out to be key factors to successfully deal with these external threat factors. In this context, three research aims related to practising artists’ professional education and preparation arise: the identification of crucial skills to successfully make a living in the arts as practising artists, the status of their professional education at higher education institutions (HEIs), and the capability of arts incubators as alternative education programmes to prepare large numbers of practising fine artists for professional success. The approach to investigation is exploratory and inductive with a cross-sectional survey strategy. To identify the crucial skills for professional success in the arts, surveys of up to 219 fine art lecturers, 168 fine art undergraduates, and 149 commercial galleries are conducted. To report on the status of fine artists’ educational preparation, 87 undergraduate degree programmes, 55 post-graduate programmes, and 46 extracurricular training offerings at HEIs are investigated. The study focuses mainly on the UK and Germany. These countries are selected due to their significantly different market sizes and reputation for the purpose of identifying differences in market challenges and professional preparations faced by fine artists. To analyse arts incubators’ capability in preparing large numbers of practising fine artists for a professional career, 92 arts incubation programmes around the globe are analysed and nine structured interviews with practising fine artists are conducted. The investigation of the crucial skills for fine artists’ professional success highlights in particular the development of an entrepreneurial mindset as well as of seven skills. Research on arts education shows evidence that fine art graduates are hardly equipped with this skillset and mindset due to HEIs’ lack of focus on the professional careers of practising artists. The analysis of arts incubation programmes illustrates serious limitations in supporting larger numbers of practising fine artists in their professional endeavours. The research findings stimulate the discussion in, and contribute to, knowledge in the fields of artists’ professional preparation, arts entrepreneurship, and the redesigning of fine art curriculum to purposefully prepare fine art graduates for an entrepreneurial and professional career as practising artists.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is little evidence in support of a spatial advantage in people with dyslexia, and, in fact, the data show that RD samples most often perform worse or equal to non-RD samples.

21 citations

01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Humphrey et al. as discussed by the authors explored the relationship between dyslexia and self-esteem in pupils, using both teacher rating scales and pupil self-reporting, and compared results from a group of pupils with dyslexias in mainstream settings; a group attending units for pupils with specific learning difficulties (SpLD); and a control group.
Abstract: Neil Humphrey is a lecturer in psychology at Bolton Institute. In this article, based on the research he carried out for his PhD thesis, he explores the relationships between dyslexia and self-esteem in pupils. Neil Humphrey gathered data using both teacher rating scales and pupil self-reporting. He compares results from a group of pupils with dyslexia in mainstream settings; a group attending units for pupils with specific learning difficulties (SpLD); and a control group. In discussing his findings, Neil Humphrey presents practitioners working towards inclusion with a carefully considered challenge.

18 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the interaction of IDENTITY-FORMATION and ARTISTIC DEVELOPMENT in the empowerment of self-worlds of three VISUAL ART GRADUATE STUDENTS.
Abstract: INTERPLAY OF IDENTITY FORMATION AND ARTISTIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE EMPOWERMENT OF SELF-WORTH OF THREE VISUAL ART GRADUATE STUDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA

17 citations