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Samuel N. C. Lieu

Bio: Samuel N. C. Lieu is an academic researcher from Macquarie University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Roman Empire & Biblical studies. The author has an hindex of 13, co-authored 44 publications receiving 929 citations. Previous affiliations of Samuel N. C. Lieu include Brill Publishers & University of Cambridge.

Papers
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BookDOI
TL;DR: In the third century, the crisis of the Roman Republic was characterized by an increasing variety of hostile peoples from outside its frontiers as mentioned in this paper. But the available sources for its history have to be compiled from a wide variety of sources, and the least adequate are those in Latin, the imperial lives of the Historia Augusta.
Abstract: The crisis of the third century saw Rome not only embroiled in contests of succeeding short-lived Emperors, but assailed by an increasing variety of hostile peoples from outside its frontiers. Owing to the complex racial interplay of this period, the sources for its history have to be compiled from a wide variety of sources. The least adequate are those in Latin, the imperial lives of the Historia Augusta . These have to be supplemented by the Greek chronicles of Zosimus and John Malalas of Antioch, as well as the Armenian history of Moses of Chorene, the Arabic History of the Arabs of Al-Tabari , as well as inscriptions in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syrian and other languages. This volume collects these diverse sources for the first time in English translation, and will be a uniquely valuable resource for scholars working on a period of Roman history that is attracting increasing attention.

220 citations

Book
01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the evolution of the Mesopotamian frontier in the fifth century, the Anastasian War and its aftermath (502-525) 6. Justinian's First Persian War and the Eternal Peace (c.525-540) 7. The Second Persian War: the southern front (540-545) 8.
Abstract: 1. The Peace of Jovian and its aftermath (636-399) 2. The evolution of the north-east frontier (363-399) 3. The Mesopotamian frontier in the fifth century 4. The northern frontier in the fifth century 5. The Anastasian War and its aftermath (502-525) 6. Justinian's First Persian War and the Eternal Peace (c.525-540) 7. Justinian's Second Persian War: the southern front (540-545) 8. . Justinian's Second Persian War: the northern front (540-562) 9. Justinian's Second Persian War: diplomatic relations (545-562) 10. The Peace of 562 and its demise (562-573) 11. The war under Tiberius (574-82) 12. The frontier in the reign of Maurice (582-602) 13. The Persian take-over of the Near East (602-622) 14. The Roman recovery under Heraclius (622-630) 15. The Khuzistan Chronicle (first part) 16. The evidence of epigraphy and the eastern frontier (363-630)

48 citations


Cited by
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BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role played by the Silk Roads in exchanging goods, tech nologies, and ideas between regions of agrarian civilization is well understood as mentioned in this paper, but the fact that they also exchanged goods and ideas among the pastoralist and agrary worlds is less well understood.
Abstract: Modern historiography has not fully appreciated the ecological complexity of the Silk Roads. As a result, it has failed to under stand their antiquity, or to grasp their full importance in Eurasian his tory. The role played by the Silk Roads in exchanging goods, tech nologies, and ideas between regions of agrarian civilization is well understood. Less well understood is the trans-ecological role of the Silk Roads?the fact that they also exchanged goods and ideas between the pastoralist and agrarian worlds. The second of these systems of exchange, though less well known, predated the more familiar "trans civilizational" exchanges, and was equally integral to the functioning of the entire system. A clear awareness of this system of trans-ecolog ical exchanges should force us to revise our understanding of the age, the significance, and the geography of the Silk Roads. Further, an appreciation of the double role of the Silk Roads affects our understanding of the history of the entire Afro-Eurasian region. The many trans-ecological exchanges mediated by the Silk Roads linked all regions of the Afro-Eurasian landmass, from its agrarian civ ilizations to its many stateless communities of woodland foragers and steppe pastoralists, into a single system of exchanges that is several mil lennia old. As a result, despite its great diversity, the history of Afro Eurasia has always preserved an underlying unity, which was expressed in common technologies, styles, cultures, and religions, even disease patterns. The extent of this unity can best be appreciated by contrast ing the history of Afro-Eurasia with that of pre-Columbian America. World historians are becoming increasingly aware of the underly ing unity of Afro-Eurasian history. Andre Gunder Frank and Barry

238 citations

Helen Haste1
28 Jul 2002
TL;DR: In the past decade, different concepts of citizenship have arisen from emergent democracies, from societies in transition, from the dissolution of the left-right spectrum in Western society, and from a changing perspective in psychological theory that attends to language and social and cultural context as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Discussions of citizenship and citizenship education have been conducted largely within the worldview of stable, Western societies and have been based on psychological models that emphasize individual cognition. The concepts of citizenship that evolved in this context have become taken for granted. But during the past decade, different concepts of citizenship have arisen from emergent democracies, from societies in transition, from the dissolution of the left-right spectrum in Western society, and from a changing perspective in psychological theory that attends to language and to social and cultural context. These developments have implications for defining the goals of citizenship education and for formulating educational programs, particularly in relation to identity, positioning, narratives, and efficacy.

237 citations

Book
13 Aug 1999
TL;DR: Elam: what, when, where, environment, climate, and resources as mentioned in this paper The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elymais 11. Eemen under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion
Abstract: 1. Elam: what, when, where? 2. Environment, climate, and resources 3. The immediate precursors of Elam 4. Elam and Awan 5. The dynasty of Shimashki 6. The grand regents of Elam and Susa 7. The kingdom of Susa and Anshan 8. The Neo-Elamite period 9. Elam in the Achaemenid empire 10. Elymais 11. Elam under the Sasanians and beyond 12. Conclusion.

182 citations

DOI
01 Dec 1997
TL;DR: In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish as mentioned in this paper and Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan, who was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic.
Abstract: Greek artefacts, craftsmen and artists had penetrated Rome since regal days; from the second century BC this trickle had become a continuing and influential flood, contributing together with Italic and Etruscan architecture and art, and the developing central Italian and Roman concrete architecture, to the rich tapestry of the art of the capital. Vespasian (69-79), founder of the Flavian dynasty, showed an astute pragmatism in his handling of architecture and art. In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish. Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan. The age of Hadrian (117-38) proved to be extraordinary, largely because of the extent to which he was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic. The rich artistic harvest of the Flavian to the Antonine ages was not just an imperial, but a corporate achievement, one which offered a worthy inheritance to following generations.

172 citations