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Author

Samuel O'Donoghue

Other affiliations: University College London
Bio: Samuel O'Donoghue is an academic researcher from Lancaster University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Humanities & Subversion. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 10 publications receiving 22 citations. Previous affiliations of Samuel O'Donoghue include University College London.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the debates regarding the use of fiction to represent traumatic twentieth-century experiences through an analysis of Jorge Semprun's Quel beau dimanche (1980) and L’ecriture ou la vie (1994), Antonio Munoz Molina's Sefarad (2001) and Alberto Mendez's Los girasoles ciegos (2004).
Abstract: This article explores the debates regarding the use of fiction to represent traumatic twentieth-century experiences. Through an analysis of Jorge Semprun’s Quel beau dimanche (1980) and L’ecriture ou la vie (1994), Antonio Munoz Molina’s Sefarad (2001) and Alberto Mendez’s Los girasoles ciegos (2004), it interrogates the value and morality of contemporary Spanish novelists’ use of fiction to explore the past. At the same time, this article seeks to build on a nascent field of critical investigation by drawing links between how novelists have written about two different historical experiences: the Spanish Civil War and the Holocaust.

7 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the influence of Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu on contemporary Spanish novelists' use of memory to recover Spain's traumatic twentieth-century history.
Abstract: Building on a recent study by Herbert Craig (2012), this article examines the influence of Marcel Proust’s A la recherche du temps perdu on contemporary Spanish novelists’ use of memory to recover Spain’s traumatic twentieth-century history. By reworking Proust’s use of literature to reconstruct the self, writers such as Jorge Semprun and Antonio Munoz Molina have used autobiographical narratives to rewrite the nation. Analysing how these writers harness Proust’s use of the past to explore the self, this article argues that Semprun and Munoz Molina posit a search for lost time as a means of serving the community.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Munoz Molina adapts Proust's model for the recovery of the self through fiction, and demonstrates how to engage empathetically with the victims of mid-twentieth century history.
Abstract: This article considers Antonio Munoz Molina's debt to Marcel Proust in his use of literature as a means of exploring alterity in the novel Sefarad (2001). Adapting Proust's model for the recovery of the self through fiction, Munoz Molina demonstrates how to engage empathetically with the victims of mid-twentieth century history. Sefarad thus posits a search for lost time through the forgotten testimonies of suffering at the hands of totalitarian regimes as a means of constructing identity, of comprehending the self in relation to the other.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors consider the dedicatory prefaces that frame Ronsard's and Garcilaso's pastoral works as an articulation of these poets' divergent political and lyrical visions of bucolic poetry.
Abstract: This article considers the dedicatory prefaces that frame Ronsard’s and Garcilaso’s pastoral works as an articulation of these poets’ divergent political and lyrical visions of bucolic poetry. While there is often a tendency to overlook prefatory matter as somehow extraneous to the text, this article argues that Ronsard’s ‘A treshaut et tresvertueux Prince Francois de France, Duc d’Anjou, fils et frere de Roy’ and Garcilaso’s dedications in the ‘Egloga primera’ and ‘Egloga tercera’ are essential documents in understanding these poets’ use of pastoral.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A close reading of Llamazares's Luna de lobos reveals an additional protagonist in this guerrilla battle set in the mountains of northern Spain: the natural world as mentioned in this paper, which is a hostile force that brutalizes the protagonists.
Abstract: To synopsize Luna de lobos as a fictionalized account of the struggle between Republican guerrillas and the Civil Guard in the immediate aftermath of the Spanish Civil War is clearly misleading. A close reading of the work reveals an additional protagonist in this guerrilla battle set in the mountains of northern Spain: the natural world. This article provides a close analysis of Llamazares's presentation of nature in order to support the assertion that the novel transcends the specificity of Spain's history to provide a broader existential study of man's place in the universe, in particular his relationship with the natural world. In Luna de lobos, nature is a hostile force that brutalizes the protagonists. This presentation of the natural world conforms to Llamazares's aesthetic concerns as a Romantic. For Llamazares, the relationship between man and nature has become irremediably fractured.

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Preston as mentioned in this paper has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide, and he quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same.
Abstract: Paul Preston is a renowned historian, and is considered one of the world’s leading experts on 20th-century Spanish history. His book on the genocidal actions taken against Spanish civilians between 1936 and 1945 is an important resource that has changed historiography on the period. From the perceived failures of the elected government to the rise of Francisco Franco and his subsequent authoritative takeover of Spain (that lasted 41 years), his book covers these events in painstaking detail. The ensuing, bloody civil war led to the death of hundreds of thousands, and the author carefully detailed every aspect of how the murders enfolded. Repression occurred on both sides, and Preston carefully laid out the origins of extermination in Spain, from the legacy of the Africanistas, to emerging genocidal rhetoric to finally murder on a massive scale. He has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide. He quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and the right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same. The radical rightists, the army, and even citizen mobs carried out mass acts of genocide against civilians who had been categorized, dehumanized, and purposely targeted for death. Preston, who in March 2012 speaking at the Embassy of Spain in London, argued that the Francoists, like Francisco Franco and other military – and civilian – conspirators killed more Spanish than the Nazis killed Germans.(1) Preston begins the text with a prologue that defends his use of the word holocaust in the title of the book, a decision, and his intent with selecting the word, will be discussed later in this review.

55 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The Shepherds' Arcadia as mentioned in this paper is a classic story about the Shepherd's Arcadia and the shepherds’ Lament, which is also related to our work.
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................................................... ix Prologue ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 Chapter One: The Shepherds’ Arcadia ....................................................................................................... 27 Chapter Two: The Shepherds’ Queen ......................................................................................................... 97 Chapter Three: The Shepherds’ Lament ................................................................................................... 160 Epilogue .................................................................................................................................................... 225 Bibliography ............................................................................................................................................. 233 Appendix A: Letter from the Institutional Research Board ...................................................................... 248 Appendix B: Supplementary Figures ........................................................................................................ 249

29 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In Unwanted Beauty: Aesthetic Pleasure in Holocaust Representation, the authors, the import of aesthetic pleasure in shifting modes of Holocaust representation ranging from French and German literature and the visual arts to architectural sites in North America and Germany is explored.
Abstract: BRETT ASHLEY KAPLAN'S UNWANTED BEAUTY: AESTHETIC PLEASURE IN HOLOCAUST REPRESENTATION, URBANA: UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS PRESS, 2007 ERIC KLIGERMAN In her rich comparative study Unwanted Beauty: Aesthetic Pleasure in Holocaust Representation, Brett Ashley Kaplan probes the import of aesthetic pleasure in shifting modes of Holocaust representation ranging from French and German literature and the visual arts to architectural sites in North America and Germany Rather than contributing to an ethical rupture, Kaplan argues, "beautiful representations can enhance Holocaust remembrance" (2) Contrary to Hal Foster's demonization of beauty, Kaplan joins other scholars who see a resurgence of aesthetic pleasure in literature and art However, Kaplan goes one step further by reading beauty alongside Holocaust representations Unwanted Beauty complements other recent works that investigate various aesthetic strategies of witnessing the Shoah in relation to questions of affect But counter to Weissman's Fantasies of Witnessing and Landsberg's concept of prosthetic memory, where each scholar examines how the nonwitness desires to feel the horrors of the Holocaust, Kaplan asserts that art does not need to terrorize in order to deepen our understanding of trauma Instead, "'illicit' aesthetic pleasure of unwanted beauty" (3) helps in the construction of Holocaust memory and "deepenfs] [the] search for Holocaust understanding" (20) Kaplan tracks the development of aesthetic pleasure from its use as a survival tool in the literature of primary witnesses to a device that catalyzes memory of the nonwitness Following her theoretical discussion of the beautiful and sublime, she probes in chapter 1 how aesthetic pleasure in the works of Celan and Delbo assists in their survival; chapter 2 continues with an exploration of how the transformative powers of beauty in Semprun's novels help him come to terms with his traumatic memory; chapter 3 shows how Jabes's aesthetic allusions to the Holocaust shift the task of witnessing to the reader, who is compelled to uncover poetry's traumatic residue; chapter 4 examines the function of visual pleasure in Kiefer and Boltanski and the degrees to which they aestheticize mourning Unwanted Beauty concludes with an analysis of the tensions between aesthetic pleasure and architecture as Kaplan rejects critics' tendencies to read monumental aesthetics as fascistic Kaplan's introduction presents the ethical implications of rendering the Holocaust into beautiful forms, and she repudiates the three interdictions against beauty most often invoked by critics: Adorno's critique that poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric, the position that the uniqueness of the Holocaust requires a new mode of representation to confront its horrors, and the assumption that beauty is indicative of a particular fascist aesthetics While scholars such as Lyotard link the Holocaust to the crisis of representation by invoking Kant's sublime and exalting the disruption of the artwork, Kaplan denies the premise that beautiful art is a disservice to traumatic memory Although her theoretical model would benefit from a closer analysis of what in particular constitutes beauty and sensual pleasure, her incisive, close readings of literary and visual texts help illuminate some of these distinct features of aesthetic pleasure Chapter 1 begins by returning to the oft-discussed polemic between Adorno's critique of poetry after Auschwitz and Celan's signature poem, "Death Fugue" But what makes this chapter so compelling are Kaplan's provocative readings of Delbo and Proust Moving away from Freud's model of traumatic memory, Kaplan foregrounds instead the intricacies of Proust's figure of memory and its associations with sensual pleasure The invocation of how pleasure evokes memory in Remembrance of Things Past-the nostalgia induced by a madeleine soaked in tea-functions as the template to how unwanted beauty influences Holocaust memory …

28 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2011

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The principal subject of this annual bibliography is the English language scholarly literature of United States Communism, supplemented by citations from serious non-scholarly journals, obituaries, etc as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The principal subject of this annual bibliography is the English language scholarly literature of United States Communism, supplemented by citations from serious non-scholarly journals, obituaries,...

24 citations