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Author

Samuel O'Donoghue

Other affiliations: University College London
Bio: Samuel O'Donoghue is an academic researcher from Lancaster University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Humanities & Subversion. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 10 publications receiving 22 citations. Previous affiliations of Samuel O'Donoghue include University College London.

Papers
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TL;DR: Goytisolo is considered to be a desecrator of established conventions, but also the inheritor of some of these same conventions as discussed by the authors, and the authors of Senas de identidad (1966) use a paraphrase of Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu as a means of recovering the past.
Abstract: JUAN Goytisolo is envisaged by numerous critics as an iconoclast, a violator of traditions, and an experimentalist at the vanguard of twentieth-century Spanish literature. The titles of a number of critical studies point to Goytisolo's hostility towards conventions as a defining characteristic of his work: thus Alison Ribeiro de Menezes refers to the author as a "dissident"; Stanley Black intimates that he is "radical"; and Juan Carlos Curutchet, Linda Gould Levine, and Abigail Lee Six all emphasize the destructive nature of Goytisolo's novelistic enterprise. In this article I suggest that it is productive to consider Goytisolo not only as a desecrator of established conventions, but also as the inheritor of some of these same conventions. Goytisolo's dissidence and narrative experimentalism are not incompatible with the acute interest he displays in canonical works of literature. The author himself points critics in this direction: he suggests that his literary forefathers, not his disciples, matter the most to him (qtd. in Davis, Writing 92). In the study that follows I offer a reading of Senas de identidad (1966) that foregrounds Goytisolo's literary influences. I argue that the opening of the novel functions as a symbolic performance of the author's search for a literary father, as Goytisolo looks for (and finds) a paradigm through which to articulate his protagonist's quest to rediscover the past and the self. This study seeks to shed light on the hitherto incomplete "senas" of Goytisolo's literary parentage by deciphering the imprint of Marcel Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu on Goytisolo's use of involuntary memory as a means of recovering the past in Senas de identidad. The detailed critical discussion of Goytisolo's literary antecedents has until now focused almost exclusively on the influence of Luis Martin-Santos, Carlos Fuentes, or the ideas of the Russian formalists and the Prague school. (1) Proust's omission from the catalogue of major influences on Goytisolo's novel might be attributed to the fact that Senas contains no explicit references to Proust; Goytisolo is content merely to allude to his French precursor by using expressions such as "recuperar el tiempo perdido" (Senas 44). But in Coto vedado Goytisolo admits to his predilection for Proust and other foreign, principally French authors he discovered and in which he reveled during his childhood and adolescence (52, 120, 153). The author claims to have begun his exile long before his actually leaving Spain in 1956, by immersing himself in an exclusively Francophone literary environment, something the author terms a "filtro que me alejo durante anos de la poesia y novelas escritas en mi lengua con consecuencias faciles de calcular" (Coto 198). This study is an attempt precisely to gauge these consequences, to which Goytisolo alludes suggestively, by assessing the repercussions of the author's reading of Proust on his literary output. Although numerous critics refer fleetingly to the Proustian overtones of Alvaro's use of objects to resuscitate the past, only two Ronald Schwartz (198-99) and Herbert Craig (240-43)--have dedicated serious consideration to the parallels between Goytisolo and Proust. (2) But neither Schwartz nor Craig presses the argument that Proust is a significant, indeed even essential presence in Goytisolo's novel. Craig helpfully observes a number of instances in Senas in which Alvaro's recollection of the past is produced by involuntary memory. Yet this critic offers little analysis to support his position regarding Proust's deep impression on the Spanish novelist. Craig adds limited commentary to his quotes, leaving them to stand alone as self-explanatory examples of Proustian influence. Schwartz provides a convincing comparison of A la recherche and Senas, but goes on to make the caveat that the affinities between the two works should not be over-emphasized: "The comparison of Goytisolo's popular novel to Proust's immortal one should not be prolonged" (199). …

Cited by
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TL;DR: Preston as mentioned in this paper has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide, and he quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same.
Abstract: Paul Preston is a renowned historian, and is considered one of the world’s leading experts on 20th-century Spanish history. His book on the genocidal actions taken against Spanish civilians between 1936 and 1945 is an important resource that has changed historiography on the period. From the perceived failures of the elected government to the rise of Francisco Franco and his subsequent authoritative takeover of Spain (that lasted 41 years), his book covers these events in painstaking detail. The ensuing, bloody civil war led to the death of hundreds of thousands, and the author carefully detailed every aspect of how the murders enfolded. Repression occurred on both sides, and Preston carefully laid out the origins of extermination in Spain, from the legacy of the Africanistas, to emerging genocidal rhetoric to finally murder on a massive scale. He has written a text that is masterly and authoritative in scope, seeking to place the extermination of the Spanish during this period in analysis of genocide. He quite evenly, detailed the crimes against humanity of both the left and the right as well as the subsequent concealment of the same. The radical rightists, the army, and even citizen mobs carried out mass acts of genocide against civilians who had been categorized, dehumanized, and purposely targeted for death. Preston, who in March 2012 speaking at the Embassy of Spain in London, argued that the Francoists, like Francisco Franco and other military – and civilian – conspirators killed more Spanish than the Nazis killed Germans.(1) Preston begins the text with a prologue that defends his use of the word holocaust in the title of the book, a decision, and his intent with selecting the word, will be discussed later in this review.

55 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The Shepherds' Arcadia as mentioned in this paper is a classic story about the Shepherd's Arcadia and the shepherds’ Lament, which is also related to our work.
Abstract: ....................................................................................................................................................... ix Prologue ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 Chapter One: The Shepherds’ Arcadia ....................................................................................................... 27 Chapter Two: The Shepherds’ Queen ......................................................................................................... 97 Chapter Three: The Shepherds’ Lament ................................................................................................... 160 Epilogue .................................................................................................................................................... 225 Bibliography ............................................................................................................................................. 233 Appendix A: Letter from the Institutional Research Board ...................................................................... 248 Appendix B: Supplementary Figures ........................................................................................................ 249

29 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In Unwanted Beauty: Aesthetic Pleasure in Holocaust Representation, the authors, the import of aesthetic pleasure in shifting modes of Holocaust representation ranging from French and German literature and the visual arts to architectural sites in North America and Germany is explored.
Abstract: BRETT ASHLEY KAPLAN'S UNWANTED BEAUTY: AESTHETIC PLEASURE IN HOLOCAUST REPRESENTATION, URBANA: UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS PRESS, 2007 ERIC KLIGERMAN In her rich comparative study Unwanted Beauty: Aesthetic Pleasure in Holocaust Representation, Brett Ashley Kaplan probes the import of aesthetic pleasure in shifting modes of Holocaust representation ranging from French and German literature and the visual arts to architectural sites in North America and Germany Rather than contributing to an ethical rupture, Kaplan argues, "beautiful representations can enhance Holocaust remembrance" (2) Contrary to Hal Foster's demonization of beauty, Kaplan joins other scholars who see a resurgence of aesthetic pleasure in literature and art However, Kaplan goes one step further by reading beauty alongside Holocaust representations Unwanted Beauty complements other recent works that investigate various aesthetic strategies of witnessing the Shoah in relation to questions of affect But counter to Weissman's Fantasies of Witnessing and Landsberg's concept of prosthetic memory, where each scholar examines how the nonwitness desires to feel the horrors of the Holocaust, Kaplan asserts that art does not need to terrorize in order to deepen our understanding of trauma Instead, "'illicit' aesthetic pleasure of unwanted beauty" (3) helps in the construction of Holocaust memory and "deepenfs] [the] search for Holocaust understanding" (20) Kaplan tracks the development of aesthetic pleasure from its use as a survival tool in the literature of primary witnesses to a device that catalyzes memory of the nonwitness Following her theoretical discussion of the beautiful and sublime, she probes in chapter 1 how aesthetic pleasure in the works of Celan and Delbo assists in their survival; chapter 2 continues with an exploration of how the transformative powers of beauty in Semprun's novels help him come to terms with his traumatic memory; chapter 3 shows how Jabes's aesthetic allusions to the Holocaust shift the task of witnessing to the reader, who is compelled to uncover poetry's traumatic residue; chapter 4 examines the function of visual pleasure in Kiefer and Boltanski and the degrees to which they aestheticize mourning Unwanted Beauty concludes with an analysis of the tensions between aesthetic pleasure and architecture as Kaplan rejects critics' tendencies to read monumental aesthetics as fascistic Kaplan's introduction presents the ethical implications of rendering the Holocaust into beautiful forms, and she repudiates the three interdictions against beauty most often invoked by critics: Adorno's critique that poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric, the position that the uniqueness of the Holocaust requires a new mode of representation to confront its horrors, and the assumption that beauty is indicative of a particular fascist aesthetics While scholars such as Lyotard link the Holocaust to the crisis of representation by invoking Kant's sublime and exalting the disruption of the artwork, Kaplan denies the premise that beautiful art is a disservice to traumatic memory Although her theoretical model would benefit from a closer analysis of what in particular constitutes beauty and sensual pleasure, her incisive, close readings of literary and visual texts help illuminate some of these distinct features of aesthetic pleasure Chapter 1 begins by returning to the oft-discussed polemic between Adorno's critique of poetry after Auschwitz and Celan's signature poem, "Death Fugue" But what makes this chapter so compelling are Kaplan's provocative readings of Delbo and Proust Moving away from Freud's model of traumatic memory, Kaplan foregrounds instead the intricacies of Proust's figure of memory and its associations with sensual pleasure The invocation of how pleasure evokes memory in Remembrance of Things Past-the nostalgia induced by a madeleine soaked in tea-functions as the template to how unwanted beauty influences Holocaust memory …

28 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2011

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The principal subject of this annual bibliography is the English language scholarly literature of United States Communism, supplemented by citations from serious non-scholarly journals, obituaries, etc as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The principal subject of this annual bibliography is the English language scholarly literature of United States Communism, supplemented by citations from serious non-scholarly journals, obituaries,...

24 citations