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Sandy Baldwin

Bio: Sandy Baldwin is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Electronic literature. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 2 publications receiving 9 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) project as mentioned in this paper was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP.
Abstract: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP for Creativity and Innovation. ELMCIP involved seven European academic research partners and one non-academic partner who investigated how creative communities of practitioners form within a transnational and transcultural context in a globalized and distributed communication environment. Focusing on the electronic literature community in Europe as a model of networked creativity and innovation in practice, ELMCIP intended both to study the formation and interactions of that community and also to further electronic literature research and practice in Europe.

8 citations

Book
01 Sep 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the role and function of community in the contemporary practice of electronic literature is discussed, with ten essays by thirteen leading authors, providing wide-ranging perspectives and approaches.
Abstract: This is a diverse collection on the role and function of community in the contemporary practice of electronic literature, with ten essays by thirteen leading authors, providing wide-ranging perspectives and approaches. The collection offers historical narratives of institutions in the field, examples of how particular platforms or genres can inspire community, and stories of how ad hoc communities can form around specific creative projects. These case studies are histories of creative affiliations in electronic literaturesnapshots of consensus-based communities in their process of formationand offer a starting point for broader theoretical analyses of network-based creative community.

1 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010

944 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Pink argues that these kinds of specificities and interruptions and mundane troubles feel lost both within the re-enactment procedure and, in other chapters, among the theory-driven commentary that peppers the short sections of description and data, drawing the attention ever outward and beyond practice and place.
Abstract: Not as isolated events, but as a practice invariably tangled up with other activities, routes and rhythms, which pressure and interrupt getting the washing up done and put away, or the recycling sorted into one of four (or more?) receptacles. Contingencies that might find people bunging dishes in a dishwasher, or filling up a sink full of hot water and leaving the dishes to soak, only to do it again in the morning, or chucking unsorted recycling into a black bag to speed its passage from the house. Kids, partners, pets, interruptions, ruptures and breaks of all kind make up the intensity of domestic social life, and the familiar distractions and hurries are surely the very stuff of everyday life, and place for that matter – complicated, entangled, uncomfortable and messy, yet, ultimately, socially organised. And these kinds of specificities and interruptions and mundane troubles – the very things that Pink is arguing are important – feel lost both within the (re)enactment procedure and, in other chapters, among the theory-driven commentary that peppers the short sections of description and data, drawing the attention ever outward and ‘beyond’ practice and place. Despite these potential limitations, the book will undoubtedly make a contribution to sustainability research and provide an important means for researchers to approach the accessing of local practices and settings of activism. And while the aim, to draw attention to the everyday experiences and entanglements of practice and place, is certainly laudable, the portrayal, dismissal and attempted departure from perspectives and methods, which, agree with them or not, continue to inform the cutting edge of contemporary social science – and have a good deal to offer this particular field – is, perhaps, unsustainable.

7 citations

Book ChapterDOI
13 Dec 2020
TL;DR: The Bloomsbury Open Collection is available as open access through the BLOOMSbury Open programme and is available on www.bloomshops.com as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This book is available as open access through the Bloomsbury Open programme and is available on www.bloomsburycollections.com.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an extended version of a paper I gave at Kingston University as an invited speaker at the 'From Page to Screen to Augmented Reality' Conference in July 2010 is presented.
Abstract: This article is an extended version of a paper I gave at Kingston University as an invited speaker at the 'From Page to Screen to Augmented Reality' Conference in July 2010. The paper begins from a discussion of a digital text work of my own, entitled …ha perdut la veu. This is a bilingual text work in English and Catalan, and was first shown at the E-poetry conference at the University of Barcelona, May 2009. The text is drawn partly from the translation into Catalan of one of my early children’s novels, La Freda ha perdut la veu. (Alfreda Abbot's Lost Voice OUP), hence the title of the piece. The English text is taken from a translation of Deleuze and Guattari’s Kafka: Towards a Minor Literature. Translation is being used here for its explanatory force in relation to both digital text and performance writing. The paper has two objectives. The first is to give a clear example of the way in which practice and theory, or rather practice-as-research, can exist as a symbiotic relationship – each benefiting and illuminating the other. The second is to propose and map out an area of potential further research into the discursive positioning of electronic literature/digital writing within Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of minorisation as articulated by Jean-Jacques Lecercle in his book, Deleuze and Style. The conference itself was organised by Dr Maria Mencia and the keynote was given by Jay David Bolter, Wesley Chair of New Media and a professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author among other things of Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print, a highly influential critical text of electronic literature.

3 citations