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Sandy Petrey

Bio: Sandy Petrey is an academic researcher from Stony Brook University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Literary theory & Realism. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 28 publications receiving 460 citations.

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103 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: In this article, an introduction to speech-act theory as developed by J. L. Austin with a survey of critical essays that have adapted Austin's thought for literary analysis is presented.
Abstract: This book, first published in 1990, combines an introduction to speech-act theory as developed by J. L. Austin with a survey of critical essays that have adapted Austin's thought for literary analysis. Speech-act theory emphasizes the social reality created when speakers agree that their language is performative - Austin's term for utterances like: "we hereby declare" or "I promise" that produce rather than describe what they name. In contrast to formal linguistics, speech-act theory insists on language's active prominence in the organization of collective life. The first section of the text concentrates on Austin's determination to situate language in society by demonstrating the social conventions manifest in language. The second and third parts of the book discuss literary critics' responses to speech-act theory's socialisation of language, which have both opened new understandings of textuality in general and stimulated new interpretations of individual works. This book will be of interest to students of linguistics and literary theory.

99 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper defined changes with age in word association norms in a more informative and more comprehensive manner than the syntactic classifications normally used, concluding that the principal development as subjects mature is an episodic-semantic shift.

96 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Tulving as discussed by the authors argues for the distinction between episodic and semantic memory as functionally separate albeit closely interacting systems and discusses empirical and theoretical reasons for a tentative acceptance of the functional distinction between the two systems and its possible extensions.
Abstract: Elements of episodic memory (Tulving 1983b) consists of three parts. Part I argues for the distinction between episodic and semantic memory as functionally separate albeit closely interacting systems. It begins with a review of the 1972 essay on the topic (Tulving 1972) and its shortcomings, presents a somewhat more complete characterization of the two forms of memory than the one that was possible in 1972, and proceeds to discuss empirical and theoretical reasons for a tentative acceptance of the functional distinction between the two systems and its possible extensions. Part II describes a framework for the study of episodic memory, dubbed General Abstract Processing System (GAPS). The basic unit in such study is an act of remembering. It begins with the witnessing of an event and ends with recollective experience of the event, with related memory performance, or both. The framework specifies a number of components (elements) of the act of remembering and their interrelations, classified under two broad categories of encoding and retrieval. Part III discusses experimental research under the label of “synergistic ecphory.” Ecphory is one of the central elements of retrieval; “synergistic” refers to the joint influence that the stored episodic information and the cognitively present retrieval information exert on the construction of the product of ecphory, the so-called ecphoric information. The concept of encoding specificity and the phenomenon of recognition failure of recallable words figure prominently in Part III. The final chapter of the book describes a model, named the synergistic ecphory model of retrieval, that relates qualitative characteristics of recollective experience and quantitative measures of memory performance in recall and recognition to the conjunction of episodic-memory traces and semantic-memory retrieval cues.

708 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that in the absence of explicit co-occurrence, poor comprehenders are less sensitive to abstract semantic relations than normal readers.

276 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: The present paper reviews part of these recent findings on automaticity in an attempt to answer two questions: First, what are the functional properties of automatic as opposed to non-automatic processes?
Abstract: The rediscovery of the old distinction between automatic and consciously controlled mental processes has been one of the major developments in attentional theory during the last decade. According to the “two process” approach (e.g., LaBerge & Samuels, 1974; Neumann, Note 1; Posner & Snyder, 1975a; Shiffrin & Schneider, 1977), mental operations can function in two different modes. Processes in the first mode occur as a passive consequence of stimulation and take place in a parallel, capacity-free manner, whereas processes in the second mode are controlled by the person’s conscious intentions and are subject to capacity limitations. This distinction has stimulated a wealth of research, some of which has been summarized by LaBerge (1981) and Posner (1978, 1982). The present paper reviews part of these recent findings on automaticity in an attempt to answer two questions: First, what are the functional properties of automatic as opposed to non-automatic processes? Second, what kind of theory is suited to explain these properties?

271 citations