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Sarah Bunin Benor

Bio: Sarah Bunin Benor is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Slavic languages & Obituary. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 4 publications receiving 11 citations.

Papers
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MonographDOI
20 Nov 2015
TL;DR: Bar-Ziv and Agranovsky as mentioned in this paper discuss the evolution of the structure of Free Relative Clauses in Modern Hebrew and the role of Yiddish and Russian in the development of Modern Hebrew.
Abstract: Developments in Phrasal Constructions Elitzur Bar-Asher Siegal - What is new in the NP-strategy for expressing reciprocity reciprocity in Modern Hebrew, and what are its origins? Miri Bar-Ziv and Vera Agranovsky -- The evolution of the structure of Free Relative Clauses in Modern Hebrew: Internal development and contact language influence Chanan Ariel -- The expression of material constitution in Revival Hebrew Keren Dubnov -- Circumstantial vs. Depictive secondary predicates in Literary Hebrew - the influence of Yiddish and Russian Malka Rappaport Hovav -- A Constructional idiom in Modern Hebrew: the influence of English on a native Hebrew collocation Nimrod Shatil -- The diachrony of Hebrew Quality Pseudo-partitives: Are they a calque of the contact languages? Developments in Word Structure and Word Distribution Yael Reshef -- On the impact of contact languages on the formation of the Hebrew superlative Edit Doron & Irit Meir -- The impact of contact languages on the degrammaticalization of the Hebrew definite article Uri Horesh and Roey Gafter - When the construction is axla, everything is axla: A case of combined lexical and structural borrowing from Arabic to Hebrew. Einat Keren - From Negative Polarity to Negative Concord - Slavic footprints in the diachronic change of Hebrew meguma, klum and sum davar Avigail Tsirkin-Sadan -- bixlal in Modern Hebrew: Inheritance and Slavic contact Shira Wigderson - The sudden disappearance of nitpael and the rise of hitpael in Modern Hebrew, and the role of Yiddish in the process Developments in Clause-structure and Its Constituents Aynat Rubinstein, Ivy Sichel & Avigail Tsirkin-Sadan -- Superfluous negation in Modern Hebrew and its origins Moshe Taube -- The usual suspects: Slavic, Yiddish and the accusative existentials and possessives in Modern Hebrew Ophira Gamliel & Abed al-Rahman Mar'i -- Bleached verbs as aspectual auxiliaries in Colloquial Modern Hebrew and Arabic dialects Olga Kagan - Predicate nominal sentences with the Hebrew ze and its Russian counterpart eto Nora Boneh & Elitzur Bar-Asher Siegal -- Reconsidering the emergence of non-core dative constructions in Modern Hebrew Yishai Neuman -- Substrate sources and internal evolution of prescriptively unwarranted 'comitative complements in Modern Hebrew Developments in the Clausal Periphery 10 Isaac Bleaman - Verbal predicate fronting in Modern Hebrew and Yiddish 10 Yehudit Henshke - Patterns of dislocation: Judeo-Arabic syntactic influence on Modern Hebrew 13 Ora Schwarzwald & Sigal Shlomo - Modern Hebrew se- and Judeo-Spanish ke- (que-) in independent modal constructions 10 Itamar Francez - Modern Hebrew lama-se interrogatives and their Judeo-Spanish origins 13 Samir Khalaily and Edit Doron - Colloquial Modern Hebrew doubly-marked interrogatives and the contact with Arabic and Neo-Aramaic dialects 17 Yael Ziv -- The right periphery in Colloquial Hebrew: Effects of spoken modality and contact languages

11 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article proposed a set of principles and methodologies for the crosslinguistic investigation of grammatical complexity and applied them to the in-depth study of one grammatical domain, gender.
Abstract: This paper proposes a set of principles and methodologies for the crosslinguistic investigation of grammatical complexity and applies them to the in-depth study of one grammatical domain, gender. T ...

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 2019
TL;DR: Evaluation of morphological analysis based on Modern Hebrew language models is shown to distinguish between genres in the historical variety, highlighting the importance of ephemeral materials for linguistic research and for potential collaboration with libraries and cultural institutions in the process of corpus creation.
Abstract: The paper describes the creation of the first open access multi-genre historical corpus of Emergent Modern Hebrew, made possible by implementation of digital humanities methods in the process of corpus curation, encoding, and dissemination. Corpus contents originate in the Ben-Yehuda Project, an open access repository of Hebrew literature online, and in digital images curated from the collections of the National Library of Israel, a selection of which have been transcribed through a dedicated crowdsourcing task that feeds back into the library’s online catalog. Texts in the corpus are encoded following best practices in the digital humanities, including markup of metadata that enables time-sensitive research, linguistic and other, of the corpus. Evaluation of morphological analysis based on Modern Hebrew language models is shown to distinguish between genres in the historical variety, highlighting the importance of ephemeral materials for linguistic research and for potential collaboration with libraries and cultural institutions in the process of corpus creation. We demonstrate the use of the corpus in diachronic linguistic research and suggest ways in which the association it provides between digital images and texts can be used to support automatic language processing and to enhance resources in the digital humanities.

7 citations

Book ChapterDOI
18 Mar 2020

6 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
27 Dec 2018
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on one conspicuous sound change in contemporary Modern Hebrew, namely the transition from [i] to [e] in the prefix of the verbal pattern hif’il, and show that the variability in contemporary language between hif'il and hef'il has two distinct sources.
Abstract: Modern Hebrew provides an idiosyncratic case for historical linguistic study: due to the discontinuity of its use as a spoken language, differences between contemporary structures and classical ones do not necessarily reflect change processes, but may instead result from imperfect language learning by the original L2 speakers of Modern Hebrew at the initial stages of speech revival. This article offers a new research direction for delineating the boundaries between the two types of phenomena based on the recent discovery of two collections of recordings of spontaneous Hebrew speech made in the 1960s. Focusing on one conspicuous sound change in contemporary Modern Hebrew, namely the transition from [i] to [e] in the prefix of the verbal pattern hif’il, we show that the variability in contemporary language between hif’il and hef’il has two distinct sources: (i) an initial state of variability between [i] and [e] in forms derived from weak root verbs (initial-[n] and middle-[w/y] roots, e.g. higi’a-hegi’a ‘arrived’) due to imperfect language learning in the initial phases of the formation of Modern Hebrew; and (ii) a recent change from [i] to [e] in forms derived from regular roots (e.g. hitxil-hetxil ‘started’). In this category, the 1960s recordings attest to a stable realization of [i] amongst all age groups, with deviations from the rules of traditional Hebrew grammar occurring only marginally. Based on this data, the measure of synchronic variation documented in the 1960s recordings is analyzed as a precursor of the sound change that developed in the language at a later stage.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the relationship between synchronic variation and language change in the context of the existential and possessive constructions in Modern Hebrew, which exhibit a normative -colloquial alternation.
Abstract: This paper considers the relationship between synchronic variation and language change in the context of the existential and possessive constructions in Modern Hebrew, which exhibit a normative – colloquial alternation. The study examines usage patterns across age groups and time periods, as represented in spoken-language corpora. It shows that the non-normative construction is used extensively in the contemporary speech of adults. Moreover, a comparison of the use of the normative – colloquial alternations by two populations, children and adults, in different time periods, provides evidence to suggest that these constructions are undergoing language change. A cross-linguistic perspective lends additional support: across languages the expression of existence involves non-canonical structures, which are particularly susceptible to language variation and, possibly, language change.

4 citations