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Sathish Paulraj Gundupalli

Bio: Sathish Paulraj Gundupalli is an academic researcher from VIT University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Municipal solid waste & Sorting. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 5 publications receiving 230 citations. Previous affiliations of Sathish Paulraj Gundupalli include Indian Institute of Technology Patna.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper reviews recent advances in physical processes, sensors, and actuators used as well as control and autonomy related issues in the area of automated sorting and recycling of source-separated MSW to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art.

299 citations

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TL;DR: It is believed that the reported thermal imaging based system can emerge as a viable and inexpensive large-scale classification-cum-sorting technology in recycling plants for processing MSW in developing countries.

44 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a feature vector comprising of mean intensity, standard deviation and image-sharpness extracted from the thermograms of individual materials present in e-waste is used to classify the feature vectors into broad categories of metal, PCB, plastic, and glass.

36 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper , the effect of pretreatment with pure, mixed, and diluted deep eutectic solvents (DESs) was evaluated for its effect on Napier grass through compositional and characterization studies.

6 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the advantages and challenges of bioplastics in transitioning towards a circular economy are assessed. But these benefits can have trade-offs, including negative agricultural impacts, competition with food production, unclear EOL management and higher costs.
Abstract: Bioplastics - typically plastics manufactured from bio-based polymers - stand to contribute to more sustainable commercial plastic life cycles as part of a circular economy, in which virgin polymers are made from renewable or recycled raw materials. Carbon-neutral energy is used for production and products are reused or recycled at their end of life (EOL). In this Review, we assess the advantages and challenges of bioplastics in transitioning towards a circular economy. Compared with fossil-based plastics, bio-based plastics can have a lower carbon footprint and exhibit advantageous materials properties; moreover, they can be compatible with existing recycling streams and some offer biodegradation as an EOL scenario if performed in controlled or predictable environments. However, these benefits can have trade-offs, including negative agricultural impacts, competition with food production, unclear EOL management and higher costs. Emerging chemical and biological methods can enable the 'upcycling' of increasing volumes of heterogeneous plastic and bioplastic waste into higher-quality materials. To guide converters and consumers in their purchasing choices, existing (bio)plastic identification standards and life cycle assessment guidelines need revision and homogenization. Furthermore, clear regulation and financial incentives remain essential to scale from niche polymers to large-scale bioplastic market applications with truly sustainable impact.

283 citations

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TL;DR: Systems and methods that could be used in waste treatment plants or machines in the future in order to make treatment of waste more efficient, as well as technologies that have already been successfully applied in other industrial sectors and will be relevant in the waste management sector for the future are presented.

209 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Whether plastics in the time of pandemic are acting as protector of the public health or polluter of the environment is reviewed and assesses to dwell upon.

198 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 May 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of the existing studies on recycling municipal and construction solid waste for the manufacture of geopolymer composites is presented, and the results indicate that although the inclusion of such waste might depress some of the attributes of these composites, proper proportion design and suitable treatment technique could alleviate these detrimental effects and further smooth the recycling progress.
Abstract: The sharply increasing solid waste generation has raised the environmental concerns worldwide which currently have been escalated to a worrying level. Intending to eliminate the negative environmental impacts of solid waste and meanwhile promote sustainability on the energy- and resource-intensive construction and building sector, considerable efforts have been devoted to recycling solid waste for the possible use in sustainable construction material products. This paper reviews the existing studies on recycling municipal and construction solid waste for the manufacture of geopolymer composites. Special attention is paid to the predominate performance of these geopolymer composite products. The principal findings of this work reveal that municipal and construction solid waste could be successfully incorporated into geopolymer composites in the forms of precursor, aggregate, additive, reinforcement fiber, or filling material. Additionally, the results indicate that although the inclusion of such waste might depress some of the attributes of geopolymer composites, proper proportion design and suitable treatment technique could alleviate these detrimental effects and further smooth the recycling progress. Finally, a brief discussion is provided to identify the important needs in the future research and development for promoting the utilization of solid waste materials in the forthcoming sustainable geopolymer industry. In summary, this work offers guidance for the better ecological choice to municipal and construction solid waste through developing waste materials into highly environmental-friendly construction materials.

109 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An image recognition system for the identification and classification of waste electrical and electronic equipment from photos to facilitate information exchange regarding the waste to be collected from individuals or from waste collection points, thereby exploiting the wide acceptance and use of smartphones.

103 citations