scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Saul Friedländer

Bio: Saul Friedländer is an academic researcher from Tel Aviv University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Nazi Germany & The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 17, co-authored 41 publications receiving 1789 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal Article
TL;DR: Friedlander and Hartman as discussed by the authors discuss the problem of truthfulness in the representation of the Holocaust in literature and the role of the author in this problem. But they do not address the problem in the context of post-Holocaust literature.
Abstract: Introduction Saul Friedlander 1. German Memory, Judicial Interrogation, and Historical Reconstruction: Writing Perpetrator History from Postwar Testimony Christopher R. Browing 2. Historical Emplotment and the Problem of Truth Hayden White 3. On Emplotment: Two Kinds of Ruin Perry Anderson 4. History, Counterhistory and Narrative Amos Funkenstien 5. Just One Witness Carlo Ginzburg 6. Of Plots, Witness and Judgments Martin Jay 7. Representing the Holocaust: Reflections on the Historians' Debate Dominick LaCapra 8. Historical Understanding and Counterrationally: The Judenrat as Epistemological Vantage Dan Diner 9. History beyond the Pleasure Principle: Some Thoughts on the Representation of Trauma Eric L. Santner 10. Habermas, Enlightenment, and Antisemitism Vincent P. Pecora 11. Between Image and Phrase: Progessive History and the "Final Solution" as Dispossession Sande Cohen 12. Science, Modernity, and the "Final Solution" Mario Biagioli 13. Holocaust and the End of History: Postmodern Historiography in Cinema Anton Kaes 14. Whose Story Is It, Anyways? Ideology and Psychology in the Representation of the Shoah in Israeli Literature Yael S. Feldman 15. Translating Paul Celan's "Todesfuge": Rhythm and Repetition as Metaphor John Felstiner 16. "The Grave in the Air": Unbound Metaphors in Post-Holocaust Poetry Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi 17. The Dialectics of Unspeakability: Language, Silence, and the Narratives of Desubjectification Peter Haidu 18. The Representation of Limits Berel Lang 19. The Book of the Destruction Geoffrey H. Hartman Notes Contributors Index

533 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997

142 citations

Book
22 Nov 1993
TL;DR: In this paper, Friedlander analyzes the historiography of the Nazi period, including conflicting interpretations of the Holocaust and the impact of German reunification, and concludes that it is of importance not only for Holocaust research itself, but also for understanding German and Israeli societies.
Abstract: "No one has written more incisively about the dynamics and divergences of German and Jewish memory of the Third Reich than Saul Friedlander His new book is a singularly important contribution to our understanding of the evolving memory of the Nazi period within German and Jewish historical consciousness" Alvin H Rosenfeld" This volume is of importance not only for Holocaust research itself, but also for understanding German and Israeli societies" Bulletin of the Arnold and Leora Finkler Institute of the Holocaust ResearchA world-famous scholar analyzes the historiography of the Nazi period, including conflicting interpretations of the Holocaust and the impact of German reunification"

133 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Social memory studies is a nonparadigmatic, transdisciplinary, centerless enterprise as discussed by the authors, and despite substantial work in a variety of disciplines, substantive areas, and geographical contexts, social memory studies are a non paradigmatic and non-disciplinary enterprise.
Abstract: Despite substantial work in a variety of disciplines, substantive areas, and geographical contexts, social memory studies is a nonparadigmatic, transdisciplinary, centerless enterprise. To remedy this relative disorganization, we (re-)construct out of the diversity of work addressing social memory a useful tradition, range of working definitions, and basis for future work. We trace lineages of the enterprise, review basic definitional disputes, outline a historical approach, and review sociological theories concerning the statics and dynamics of social memory.

1,427 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The history and memory industry has been a hot topic in the last few decades as discussed by the authors, with a renewed interest in memorization as an object of study in the field of history and history.
Abstract: WELCOME TO THE MEMORY INDUSTRY. In the grand scheme ofthings, the memory industry ranges from the museum trade to the legal battles over repressed memory and on to the market for academic books and articles that invoke memory as key word. Our scholarly fascination with things memorable is quite new. As Jeffrey K. Olick and Joyce Robbins have noted, "collective memory" emerged as an object of scholarly inquiry only in the early twentieth century, contemporaneous with the so-called crisis of historicism. Hugo von Hofmannsthal used the phrase "collective memory" in 1902, and in 1925 Maurice Halbwachs's The Social Frameworks of Memory argued, against Henri Bergson and Sigmund Freud, that memory is a specifically social phenomenon. But outside of experimental psychology and clinical psychoanalysis, few academics paid much attention to memory until the great swell of popular interest in autobiographical literature, family genealogy, and museums that marked the seventies. 1 The scholarly boom began in the 1980s with two literary events: Yosef Yerushalmi's Zakhor: jewish History and jewish Memory (1982) and Pierre Nora's "Between Memory and History," the introduction to an anthology, Lieux de me'moire (1984). Each of these texts identified memory as a primitive or sacred form opposed to modern historical consciousness. For Yerushalmi, the Jews were the archetypal people of memory who had adopted history only recently and then only in part, for "modern Jewish historiography can never replace an eroded group memory." For Nora, memory was an archaic mode of being that had been devastated by rationalization: "We speak so much of memory because there is so little of it left." Despite or perhaps because of their elegiac tone and accounts of memory as antihistorical discourse, these works found an amazing popularity and were quickly joined by others. In 1989 the translation of Nora's influential essay in a special issue of this journal and the founding of History and Memory, based in Tel Aviv and Los Angeles, showed the crystallization of a self-conscious memory discourse. A decade later the scholarly literature brims with such titles as "Sites of Memory" or "Cultural Memory" or "The Politics of Memory. "2 The emergence of memory as a key word marks a dramatic change in linguistic practice. We might be tempted to imagine the increasing use of memor as the natural result of an increased scholarly interest in the ways that popular and folk cultures

559 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings support the view that projection can serve as an egocentric heuristic for inductive reasoning and contribute to ingroup-favoritism, perceptions of ingroup homogeneity, and cooperation with ingroup members.
Abstract: Social projection is the tendency to expect similarities between oneself and others. A review of the literature and a meta-analysis reveal that projection is stronger when people make judgments about ingroups than when they make judgments about outgroups. Analysis of moderator variables further reveals that ingroup projection is stronger for laboratory groups than for real social categories. The mode of analysis (i.e., nomothetic vs. idiographic) and the order of judgments (i.e., self or group judged first) have no discernable effects. Outgroup projection is positive, but small in size. Together, these findings support the view that projection can serve as an egocentric heuristic for inductive reasoning. The greater strength of ingroup projection can contribute to ingroup-favoritism, perceptions of ingroup homogeneity, and cooperation with ingroup members.

458 citations