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Sayed Ahmad

Bio: Sayed Ahmad is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Damages & Variation (linguistics). The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 9 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: In this paper, sociolinguistic research conducted among speakers of five AustroAsiatic language varieties in northwest Bangladesh: Koda, Kol, Mahali, Mundari, and Santali is reported.
Abstract: This paper reports on sociolinguistic research conducted among speakers of five AustroAsiatic language varieties in northwest Bangladesh: Koda, Kol, Mahali, Mundari, and Santali. These are collectively referred to as the Santali Cluster because Santali is the most populous and developed language among these five varieties. Linguistic variation within and across these varieties, long-term viability of each variety, and attitudes of speakers towards their own and other language varieties were investigated. The degree of intelligibility in Santali by speakers of the other varieties and the bilingual ability in Bangla of speakers from each variety were also studied. This research was carried out from November 2004 through January 2005 through the use of word lists, questionnaires, a Bangla Sentence Repetition Test, and stories recorded in Santali, Mundari, and Mahali.

9 citations

01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, sociolinguistic research conducted among the (Oraon) Kurux community living in northwest Bangladesh was conducted in July 2005 to investigate linguistic variation among Kurux, long-term viability of Kurux language, speakers' language attitudes towards Kurux and other languages, and speakers' bilingual abilities in Oraon Sadri and Bangla.
Abstract: This paper reports on sociolinguistic research conducted among the (Oraon) Kurux community living in northwest Bangladesh. This research was conducted in July 2005. The goals of the research were to investigate linguistic variation among Kurux, long-term viability of Kurux, speakers' language attitudes towards Kurux and other languages, and speakers' bilingual abilities in Oraon Sadri and Bangla. Wordlist comparisons, questionnaires, interviews, and a Bangla Sentence Repetition Test were used. Especially interesting are the demographic patterns of bilingual ability that are emerging in the community and the influence of Bangla on the Kurux language.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors examined recent procedural protection for damages caused by medical mistakes in the UAE and made specific recommendations for changes to these rules before making specific recommendations to the authorities.
Abstract: This study examines recent procedural protection for damages caused by medical mistakes. Under the Federal Regulation No. 33 of 2020, numerous fundamental changes were made to increase the level of protection offered to those who have been injured. Numerous topics relevant to the study's topic, the descriptive and analytical methodology for those modifications, and numerous recent judicial judgments made by high courts in the UAE were discussed. The research examined legal protections before making specific recommendations for changes to these rules.

Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine major challenges to the implementation of a multilingual language-in-education policy for linguistic minorities in a country where a single language is spoken by a vast majority of people and is also the focus of the country's national language policy.
Abstract: Bangladesh is one of the poorest nations in the world – a country in which 98% of the people speak the national language Bangla and identify themselves as Bangladeshi nationals. There are also 45 or more indigenous groups which form linguistic minorities in the country, speaking more than 30 different languages, and ethno-linguistically different from the majority of the Bangla-speaking population. The country's educational policies have, until recently, ignored language issues in relation to the ethno-linguistic minorities. The National Education Policy 2009 (Final) proposes a first-language-based education policy for the indigenous minorities in the country. Considering the current language policy and planning context of Bangladesh, this paper examines major challenges to the implementation of a multilingual language-in-education policy for linguistic minorities in a country where a single language is spoken by a vast majority of people and is also the focus of the country's national language policy. Be...

32 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In Carbon in Earth as discussed by the authors, the reader will learn about the intricate aspects of atomic mineral crystal structures, models of carbon emissions, and carbon dioxide emissions in a variety of topics related to mineralogy and geochemistry.
Abstract: Every RiMG volume is unique and special and, over the years, RiMG volumes have cumulatively covered the atomic to global scales for a variety of topics related to mineralogy and geochemistry. Carbon in Earth continues in this tradition. In Carbon in Earth , the reader will learn about the intricate aspects of atomic mineral crystal structures, models of carbon emissions …

18 citations

01 Jan 1969

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
11 Dec 2020
TL;DR: Kondakov as mentioned in this paper traces six distinct dialects of Koch, viz., Wanang, Koch-Rabha (Kocha), Harigaya, Margan, Chapra and Tintekiya.
Abstract: The Koch language is spoken in the states of Assam (Goalpara, Nagaon, Dhubri, Kokrajhar, Chirang, Bongaigao, Barpeta, Baksa, Udalguri, Karbi Anglong, Golaghat districts), Meghalaya (West Garo Hills, South-West Garo Hills, South Garo Hills and East Khasi Hills Districts). Koches are found in West Bengal (Northern part) and also in Bangladesh. The speaker strength of Koch in India according to 2011 census is 36,434. Koch community is the bilingual speakers of Assamese, Bengali, Garo, Hindi, and English. Contact situations of Koch with Assamese and Bengali languages have made the language vulnerable to language shift. The UNESCO report mentions Koch as ‘Definitely Endangered’1. Koch has gained the status of a scheduled tribe in Meghalaya in 1987. Kondakov (2013) traces six distinct dialects of Koch, viz., Wanang, Koch-Rabha (Kocha), Harigaya, Margan, Chapra and Tintekiya. He (2013:24) states, “The relationship between the six Koch speech varieties are rather complex. They represent a dialect chain that stretches out from Koch-Rabha in the north to Tintekiya Koch in the south.” This is diagrammatically represented as - Koch-Rabha(Kocha)→Wanang→Harigaya→Margan, Chapra→Tintekiya where the adjacent dialects exhibit more lexical similarity than those at the ends. Nine ethno-linguistic varieties of Koch (also mentioned in Kondakov, 2013:5) have been reported during field investigation. These are Harigaya, Wanang, Tintekiya, Margan, Chapra, Satpariya, Sankar, Banai and Koch Mandai.

4 citations