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Scott Boykin

Bio: Scott Boykin is an academic researcher from Georgia Gwinnett College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Government & The Holocaust. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 7 publications receiving 23 citations.

Papers
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01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this article, the authors focus on the Armenian Genocide, which is still disputed by the Turkish government and still not offi cially recognized as a genocide by the United States government and others.
Abstract: K e y w o r d s : Armenian Genocide, transnational memory, constructivism, international norms, international law. It is often argued that the current international human rights regime is rooted in the trauma of the Holocaust, which has become an archetypal symbol of largescale violations of human rights. There is a vast body of literature exploring the ways in which the Holocaust affected the development of human rights regime (Kiernan, 2007; Levy and Sznaider, 2010; Power, 2013). The ways in which other genocides, especially disputed or “unresolved” ones in which the perpetrators avoided punishment, have affected this regime are much less researched (the exceptions include Bassiouni (1996); Dadrian (1998a, 1998b, 1998c)). Here I address this question by focusing on the Armenian Genocide, which is still disputed by the Turkish government and still not offi cially recognized as a genocide by the United States government and others. The perpetrators of this

4 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: The original meaning of the congressional power to regulate commerce among the several states was sought in the narrower dimension of the specific problem that it was intended to address: restrictions on trade imposed by the states to favor residents over those of other states.
Abstract: The purpose of the Commerce Clause was to promote international and domestic trade, and it was included in the text of the Constitution as a means of addressing a specific problem that the government under the Articles of Confederation was powerless to resolve. The original meaning of the congressional power to regulate commerce “among the several states” should be sought in the narrower dimension of the specific problem that it was intended to address: restrictions on trade imposed by the states to favor residents over those of other states. As I demonstrate here, there is ample historical evidence for this purpose. It is a limited and specific purpose and should guide the interpretation of the Commerce Clause in reviewing the constitutionality of federal legislation. It is one of many ends sought by those who drafted and ratified the Constitution, and it may have contradicted some of the ends promoted by other provisions or principles. The Commerce Clause was certainly never intended to act as the lynchpin for the expansion of federal power, as Balkin misappropriates it. Furthermore, as I demonstrate here, the Commerce Clause does not support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, which serves as the most recent and controversial case study in the abuse to which the Commerce Clause has been put by Congress and the courts.

1 citations


Cited by
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01 Apr 2011
TL;DR: In this article, the authors performed multiple regression analyses of The Social Trust Public Opinion Survey (2004) focusing on the current trust level across society, market, institution, and government and found that the significance of different determinants of trust varies by area of government.
Abstract: Part of the difficulty in pinning down trust in government may stem not only from the amorphous characteristics of trust but also from the equally vague characteristics of government. Accordingly, systematized approaches to understanding trust in government are likely to be incomplete if they are only applied to trust and not government as well. This study attempts to build upon existing attempts to pin down characteristics of trust in government by deconstructing the terms trust and government and assessing the relationships among the various components within South Korea. To analyze the determinants of trust in governments, the present research performs multiple regression analyses of The Social Trust Public Opinion Survey (2004) focusing on the current trust level across society, market, institution, and government. Our findings indicate that the significance of different determinants of trust varies by area of government. These findings add to existing literature in the field as they imply assessments of trust in government are better made when they address specific offices or branches of the government.

291 citations

01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: Kiernan as mentioned in this paper examines outbreaks of mass violence from the classical era to the present, focusing on worldwide colonial exterminations and twentieth-century case studies including the Armenian genocide, the Nazi Holocaust, Stalin's mass murders, and the Cambodian and Rwandan genocides.
Abstract: For thirty years Ben Kiernan has been deeply involved in the study of genocide and crimes against humanity. He has played a key role in unearthing confidential documentation of the atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge. His writings have transformed our understanding not only of twentieth-century Cambodia but also of the historical phenomenon of genocide. This new book--the first global history of genocide and extermination from ancient times--is among his most important achievements. Kiernan examines outbreaks of mass violence from the classical era to the present, focusing on worldwide colonial exterminations and twentieth-century case studies including the Armenian genocide, the Nazi Holocaust, Stalin's mass murders, and the Cambodian and Rwandan genocides. He identifies connections, patterns, and features that in nearly every case gave early warning of the catastrophe to come: racism or religious prejudice, territorial expansionism, and cults of antiquity and agrarianism. The ideologies that have motivated perpetrators of mass killings in the past persist in our new century, says Kiernan. He urges that we heed the rich historical evidence with its telltale signs for predicting and preventing future genocides.

280 citations

Book
19 Jul 2018
TL;DR: In this paper, Bacchus explains why most of the solutions we need must be found in local and regional partnerships of the willing that can be scaled up and linked up worldwide.
Abstract: In this time of unwillingness, the right kinds of global solutions are needed now more than ever. Climate change is here and intensifying. Anxieties over economic globalization grip many in the fear of change. While these fearful have turned inward into unwillingness, the world's willing are working harder than ever for international and other cooperative solutions. James Bacchus explains why most of the solutions we need must be found in local and regional partnerships of the willing that can be scaled up and linked up worldwide. This can only be achieved within new and enhanced enabling frameworks of global and other international rules that are upheld through the international rule of law. To succeed, these rules and frameworks must for the first time see and treat economy and environment as one. The Willing World explains how best we can build the right legal structure to attain our global goals - and summon and inspire the willingness needed to do it.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the types of partnerships and internationalisation approaches that exist in higher education, the motives of internationalisation and the most appropriate approaches to measuring the quality and progress of internationalization in postsecondary education.
Abstract: Internationalisation is the inclusion of international, intercultural and global dimensions into the objectives, policies and practices in the delivery of postsecondary education. The objective of the research was to investigate the types of partnerships and internationalisation approaches that exist in higher education, the motives of internationalisation and the most appropriate approaches to measuring the quality and progress of internationalisation in higher education. A number of studies on internationalisation have been carried out. However, there is a limit on the scale and amount of research undertaken on measuring the output of internationalisation in higher education, in particular in the context of the Canadian higher education system. This paper is based on case study research to determine the motives of internationalisation in higher education in a Canadian university and it uses the Knight Internationalisation Tracking Measure to test the quality and progress of internationalisation in the university. The research entailed document analysis, interviews and surveys which were designed to gather data on internationalisation practices and objectives from university staff involved in the management of internationalisation and international partnerships. The content of the interviews and surveys were based on the measures defined by the Knight Internationalisation Tracking Measure. The research found that higher education institutions are motivated by the prospects of attracting additional income to make-up for the reduction in government funding. In addition, internationalisation offers access to staff development opportunities, internationalisation of the curriculum, and wider benefits leading to societal development. These findings and recommendations are drawn from a single case study.

11 citations