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Scott Rettberg

Bio: Scott Rettberg is an academic researcher from University of Bergen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Electronic literature & Electronic media. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 20 publications receiving 50 citations. Previous affiliations of Scott Rettberg include Richard Stockton College of New Jersey & University of Cincinnati.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) project as mentioned in this paper was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP.
Abstract: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP for Creativity and Innovation. ELMCIP involved seven European academic research partners and one non-academic partner who investigated how creative communities of practitioners form within a transnational and transcultural context in a globalized and distributed communication environment. Focusing on the electronic literature community in Europe as a model of networked creativity and innovation in practice, ELMCIP intended both to study the formation and interactions of that community and also to further electronic literature research and practice in Europe.

8 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The critical component of the dissertation argues that the network must be understood as a writing and reading environment distinct from both print and from discrete computer applications, and surveys some of the new forms and genres currently in development.
Abstract: The dissertation contains two components: a critical component that examines recent experiments in writing literature specifically for the electronic media, and a creative component that includes selections from The Unknown, the hypertext novel I coauthored with William Gillespie and Dirk Stratton. In the critical component of the dissertation, I argue that the network must be understood as a writing and reading environment distinct from both print and from discrete computer applications. In the introduction, I situate recent network literature within the context of electronic literature produced prior to the launch of the World Wide Web, establish the current range of experiments in electronic literature, and explore some of the advantages and disadvantages of writing and publishing literature for the network. In the second chapter, I examine the development of the book as a technology, analyze “electronic book” distribution models, and establish the difference between the “electronic book” and “electronic literature.” In the third chapter, I interrogate the ideas of linking, nonlinearity, and referentiality. In the fourth chapter, I examine some specific examples of network novels: Robert Arellano’s Sunshine ’69, Shelley and Pamela Jackson’s The Doll Games, Rob Wittig’s Blue Company, and The Unknown. In discussing these network novels, I illustrate how the network imposes certain constraints on the form of the novel, and discuss some of the strategies that authors have employed to create distinctly literary reading experiences for the fragmented reading environment of the network. In the conclusion of the critical component, I survey some of the new forms and genres currently in development, and delineate some of the challenges faced by the field of electronic literature at this time. The creative component of the dissertation includes forty “scenes” from The Unknown, the 1998 trAce/AltX International Hypertext Competition-winning collaborative hypertext novel. The preface to these selections discusses the effect of remediating sections of a novel written for the network into print. In print, the selections from the hypertext novel function autonomously as a comic, metafictional, and intertextual road-trip novel, and track the rise and fall of the eponymous authors of The Unknown.

5 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) project as discussed by the authors was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP.
Abstract: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice (ELMCIP) was a three-year collaborative research project running from 2010-2013, funded by the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) JRP for Creativity and Innovation. ELMCIP involved seven European academic research partners and one non-academic partner who investigated how creative communities of practitioners form within a transnational and transcultural context in a globalized and distributed communication environment. Focusing on the electronic literature community in Europe as a model of networked creativity and innovation in practice, ELMCIP intended both to study the formation and interactions of that community and also to further electronic literature research and practice in Europe.

4 citations

Book ChapterDOI
27 Nov 2015

4 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010

944 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the use of simulations and games in tertiary education and found that the main barrier to teaching with simulations is not associated with perceptions of resource issues, but rather is influenced by views on the suitability of and risk attached to such learning methods.
Abstract: This article explores the use of simulations and games in tertiary education. It examines the extent to which academics use different simulation-based teaching approaches and how they perceive the barriers to adopting such techniques. Following a review of the extant literature, a typology of simulations is constructed. A staff survey within a UK higher education (HE) institution is conducted to investigate the use of the different approaches identified within the typology. The findings show significant levels of use of both computer and non-computer-based simulations and games. The main barrier to teaching with simulations, as perceived by the respondents, is the availability of resources. However, further analysis indicates that use of simulations is not associated with perceptions of resource issues, but rather is influenced by views on the suitability of, and risk attached to, such learning methods. The study concludes by recommending improved promotion of simulation-based teaching through enhanced in...

236 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
Jill Walker1
06 Sep 2005
TL;DR: A historical view of hypertext is presented looking at pre-web hypertext as a domesticated species bred in captivity, and arguing that on the web, some breeds ofhypertext have gone feral.
Abstract: This paper presents a historical view of hypertext looking at pre-web hypertext as a domesticated species bred in captivity, and arguing that on the web, some breeds of hypertext have gone feral. Feral hypertext is no longer tame and domesticated, but is fundamentally out of our control. In order to understand and work with feral hypertext, we need to accept this and think more as hunter-gatherers than as the farmers we have been for domesticated hypertext. The paper discusses hypertext in general with an emphasis on literary and creative hypertext practice.

45 citations