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Seiichi Koshizuka

Bio: Seiichi Koshizuka is an academic researcher from University of Tokyo. The author has contributed to research in topics: Particle & Coolant. The author has an hindex of 41, co-authored 253 publications receiving 7627 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a moving-particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for simulating fragmentation of incompressible fluids is presented, where the motion of each particle is calculated through interactions with neighboring particles covered with the kernel function.
Abstract: A moving-particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for simulating fragmentation of incompressible fluids is presented. The motion of each particle is calculated through interactions with neighboring particles covered with the kernel function. Deterministic particle interaction models representing gradient, Laplacian, and free surfaces are proposed. Fluid density is implicitly required to be constant as the incompressibility condition, while the other terms are explicitly calculated. The Poisson equation of pressure is solved by the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient method. Collapse of a water column is calculated using MPS. The effect of parameters in the models is investigated in test calculations. Good agreement with an experiment is obtained even if fragmentation and coalescence of the fluid take place.

1,653 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) algorithm is used for two-dimensional incompressible non-viscous flow analysis and two types of breaking waves, plunging and spilling breakers, are observed in the calculation results.
Abstract: SUMMARY The numerical method used in this study is the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, which is based on particles and their interactions. The particle number density is implicitly required to be constant to satisfy incompressibility. A semi-implicit algorithm is used for two-dimensional incompressible non-viscous flow analysis. The particles whose particle number densities are below a set point are considered as on the free surface. Grids are not necessary in any calculation steps. It is estimated that most of computation time is used in generation of the list of neighboring particles in a large problem. An algorithm to enhance the computation speed is proposed. The MPS method is applied to numerical simulation of breaking waves on slopes. Two types of breaking waves, plunging and spilling breakers, are observed in the calculation results. The breaker types are classified by using the minimum angular momentum at the wave front. The surf similarity parameter which separates the types agrees well with references. Breaking waves are also calculated with a passively moving float which is modelled by particles. Artificial friction due to the disturbed motion of particles causes errors in the flow velocity distribution which is shown in comparison with the theoretical solution of a cnoidal wave. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

767 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a parabolic solver for steady-state equations in r−z two dimensions, a k−ϵ model for turbulence and a steam table library for physical properties of supercritical water cooling in a vertical pipe is numerically analyzed.
Abstract: Deterioration in heat transfer at supercritical water cooling in a vertical pipe is numerically analyzed. The calculation is based on a parabolic solver for steady-state equations in r−z two dimensions, a k−ϵ model for turbulence and a steam table library for physical properties of supercritical water. Calculation results agree with the experimental data of Yamagata et al. It is found that heat transfer deterioration is caused by two mechanisms depending on the flow rate. When the heat flux is increased much above the deterioration heat flux, a violent oscillation is observed in the temperature distribution.

257 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a coarse grain model for large-scale DEM simulations is proposed, where a modeled particle whose size is larger than the original particle is used instead of a crowd of original particles.
Abstract: Discrete element method (DEM) is an effective approach to evaluate granular flows, whereas it is hardly used in investigating the design and the operational conditions in industries. This is due to the fact that the number of calculated particles is restricted by the limit of computer memories. In this study, a coarse grain model for large-scale DEM simulations is proposed, where a modeled particle whose size is larger than the original particle is used instead of a crowd of original particles. The coarse grain model is applied to a three-dimensional plug flow in a horizontal pipeline. The plug length, the cycle and the stationary layer area occupation are compared between the coarse grain particle system and the original particle one. The results show that the coarse grain model can simulate the original particle behavior adequately.

245 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a moving-particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for simulating fragmentation of incompressible fluids is presented, where the motion of each particle is calculated through interactions with neighboring particles covered with the kernel function.
Abstract: A moving-particle semi-implicit (MPS) method for simulating fragmentation of incompressible fluids is presented. The motion of each particle is calculated through interactions with neighboring particles covered with the kernel function. Deterministic particle interaction models representing gradient, Laplacian, and free surfaces are proposed. Fluid density is implicitly required to be constant as the incompressibility condition, while the other terms are explicitly calculated. The Poisson equation of pressure is solved by the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient method. Collapse of a water column is calculated using MPS. The effect of parameters in the models is investigated in test calculations. Good agreement with an experiment is obtained even if fragmentation and coalescence of the fluid take place.

1,653 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview on the SPH method and its recent developments is presented, including the need for meshfree particle methods, and advantages of SPH, and several important numerical aspects.
Abstract: Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshfree particle method based on Lagrangian formulation, and has been widely applied to different areas in engineering and science. This paper presents an overview on the SPH method and its recent developments, including (1) the need for meshfree particle methods, and advantages of SPH, (2) approximation schemes of the conventional SPH method and numerical techniques for deriving SPH formulations for partial differential equations such as the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, (3) the role of the smoothing kernel functions and a general approach to construct smoothing kernel functions, (4) kernel and particle consistency for the SPH method, and approaches for restoring particle consistency, (5) several important numerical aspects, and (6) some recent applications of SPH. The paper ends with some concluding remarks.

1,398 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is presented to treat two-dimensional interfacial flows, that is, flow fields with different fluids separated by sharp interfaces.
Abstract: An implementation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is presented to treat two-dimensional interfacial flows, that is, flow fields with different fluids separated by sharp interfaces. Test cases are presented to show that the present formulation remains stable for low density ratios. In particular, results are compared with those obtained by other solution techniques, showing a good agreement. The classical dam-break problem is studied by the present two-phase approach and the effects of density-ratio variations are discussed. The role of air entrapment on loads is discussed.

1,319 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhu et al. as discussed by the authors provided a summary of the studies based on discrete particle simulation in the past two decades or so, with emphasis on the microdynamics including packing/flow structure and particle-particle, particle-fluid and particle wall interaction forces.
Abstract: Understanding and modelling the dynamic behaviour of particulate systems has been a major research focus worldwide for many years. Discrete particle simulation plays an important role in this area. This technique can provide dynamic information, such as the trajectories of and transient forces acting on individual particles, which is difficult to obtain by the conventional experimental techniques. Consequently, it has been increasingly used by various investigators for different particulate processes. In spite of the large bulk volume, little effort has been made to comprehensively review and summarize the progress made in the past. To overcome this gap, we have recently completed a review of the major work in this area in two separate parts. The first part has been published [Zhu, H.P., Zhou, Z.Y., Yang, R.Y., Yu, A.B., 2007. Discrete particle simulation of particulate systems: theoretical developments. Chemical Engineering Science 62, 3378–3392.], which reviews the major theoretical developments. This paper is the second one, aiming to provide a summary of the studies based on discrete particle simulation in the past two decades or so. The studies are categorized into three subject areas: particle packing, particle flow, and particle–fluid flow. The major findings are discussed, with emphasis on the microdynamics including packing/flow structure and particle–particle, particle–fluid and particle–wall interaction forces. It is concluded that discrete particle simulation is an effective method for particle scale research of particulate matter. The needs for future research are also discussed.

1,253 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the development and validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology for the simulation of dispersed two-phase flows, which employs averaged mass and momentum conservation equations to describe the time-dependent motion of both phases.
Abstract: This study describes the development and validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology for the simulation of dispersed two-phase flows. A two-fluid (Euler-Euler) methodology previously developed at Imperial College is adapted to high phase fractions. It employs averaged mass and momentum conservation equations to describe the time-dependent motion of both phases and, due to the averaging process, requires additional models for the inter-phase momentum transfer and turbulence for closure. The continuous phase turbulence is represented using a two-equation k − ε−turbulence model which contains additional terms to account for the effects of the dispersed on the continuous phase turbulence. The Reynolds stresses of the dispersed phase are calculated by relating them to those of the continuous phase through a turbulence response function. The inter-phase momentum transfer is determined from the instantaneous forces acting on the dispersed phase, comprising drag, lift and virtual mass. These forces are phase fraction dependent and in this work revised modelling is put forward in order to capture the phase fraction dependency of drag and lift. Furthermore, a correlation for the effect of the phase fraction on the turbulence response function is proposed. The revised modelling is based on an extensive survey of the existing literature. The conservation equations are discretised using the finite-volume method and solved in a solution procedure, which is loosely based on the PISO algorithm, adapted to the solution of the two-fluid model. Special techniques are employed to ensure the stability of the procedure when the phase fraction is high or changing rapidely. Finally, assessment of the methodology is made with reference to experimental data for gas-liquid bubbly flow in a sudden enlargement of a circular pipe and in a plane mixing layer. Additionally, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed using an interface-capturing methodology in order to gain insight into the dynamics of free rising bubbles, with a view towards use in the longer term as an aid in the development of inter-phase momentum transfer models for the two-fluid methodology. The direct numerical simulation employs the mass and momentum conservation equations in their unaveraged form and the topology of the interface between the two phases is determined as part of the solution. A novel solution procedure, similar to that used for the two-fluid model, is used for the interface-capturing methodology, which allows calculation of air bubbles in water. Two situations are investigated: bubbles rising in a stagnant liquid and in a shear flow. Again, experimental data are used to verify the computational results.

968 citations