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Serbrenia J. Sims

Bio: Serbrenia J. Sims is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Higher education & Historically black colleges and universities. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 34 citations.

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01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: The role of HBCU's Faculty in Teaching Diversity Diversity Diversity: How to Institutionalize and Solidify a New Status as mentioned in this paper The role of the Faculty in teaching diversity Diversity and HBCUs: Definitions, history and issues Implementing Reform Efforts Changing the Academic Subcultures via the Formal Curriculum Recruiting Admitting and Retaining the White Minority Cooperative Arrangements: Taking the Lead in Social Change Making the Campus Friendly to Other Race Students: Modifying the Extracurriculum HBCUE Diversity Transition Model: Building Bridges Between Cultures
Abstract: Preface Diversity and the HBCU: Definitions, History and Issues Implementing Reform Efforts Changing the Academic Subcultures via the Formal Curriculum Recruiting Admitting and Retaining the White Minority Cooperative Arrangements: Taking the Lead in Social Change Making the Campus Friendly to Other Race Students: Modifying the Extracurriculum HBCU Diversity Transition Model: Building Bridges Between Cultures The Role of HBCU's Faculty in Teaching Diversity Diversity: How to Institutionalize and Solidify a New Status

34 citations


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Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors examines the history, present, and future of Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and considers new challenges that face these institutions, addressing how HBCUs are positioned to move forward with their important mission of educating the Black community.
Abstract: This article examines the history, present, and future of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). We begin with a brief review of the existing literature on HBCUs, considering common themes and how these institutions changed over time within a broader sociohistorical landscape. In addition to historical information, we use a national database to illuminate trends and shifts in the students choosing to attend, and being served by, these institutions. We close by considering new challenges that face these institutions, addressing how HBCUs are positioned to move forward with their important mission of educating the Black community. "Education is thus simply the means by which a society prepares, in its children, the essential conditions of its own existence." (Emile Durkheim, 1972, p. 203) "Education will set this tangle straight." (W. E. B. Du Bois, 1903/1989, p. 76) "When you control a man's thinking, you do not have to worry about his actions." Carter G. Woodson (1933, p. xiii) Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have been at the center of the Black struggle for equality and dignity. The American ethos idealizes education and personal achievement over birthright as the sole basis for one's place in society-except for African Americans. We have always been judged by the color of our skin, denied equal educational opportunity, and told the educational gap between Blacks and Whites was the reason for our subjugated status in society. It is therefore not surprising that education has been a key site for Black struggle. For African Americans, education embodies not only a means toward gaining equality and progress, but the very essence of citizenship and pereonhood. We have pursued higher education with faith, perseverance and desperation, absolutely convinced that the keys to our deliverance from racial oppression lay hidden in the pages of books we were forbidden to read. As the opening quotes attest, HBCUs play important roles in the perpetuation of Black culture, the improvement of Black community life, and the preparation of the next generation of the Black leadership. Durkheim's quote reminds us that above all, education is culturally specific; education is rooted in and reflects the conditions, worldview and purposes of its parent society. In this respect, HBCUs have been profoundly shaped by the circumstances (historical, economic, political, and cultural) that define Black lives and communities in America. Du Bois's quote highlights the mandate for these institutions to engage the world, improve the circumstances of Black people and challenge the nation to realize its highest ideals. Finally, the quote from Woodson emphasizes the transformative power of education and the responsibility of HBCUs to empower individuals to change lives, their communities, and society. This has been the daunting charge to this unique group of institutions of higher learning; they have been called to preserve a culture, prosper a community, equip a new generation of leaders, and model what is best about America. The dawning of the 21st century is an appropriate moment to consider the trends, prospects, and challenges of HBCUs. In this article, we reassess the past, present, and future role of HBCUs while advocating the need for a perspective that considers how they function as institutions within a social system characterized by multiple forms of oppression. Specifically, we attempt an analysis of HBCUs that stresses the frequent, systemic interactions among race, gender, and class in the historical and contemporary eras. We close by considering new challenges that face these institutions and addressing how HBCUs are positioned to go forward with their important mission of educating the Black community with the goal to change American society for the better. THE PROMISE OF BROWN The 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) was one of the most far-reaching in American history. …

132 citations

01 Sep 2001
Abstract: DOCUMENT RESUME

70 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The quest to facilitate equity and equality in postsecondary educational access, opportunity, and attainment is a critical effort in advancing America's democratic ideal (Brown, 1999b).
Abstract: Collegiate desegregation remains one of higher education’s most important challenges. The quest to facilitate equity and equality in postsecondary educational access, opportunity, and attainment is a critical effort in advancing America’s democratic ideal (Brown, 1999b). Yet despite collegiate desegregation’s significance, higher education researchers and policy makers lack clarity or consensus about it even as state coordinating boards and institutional boards of trustees implement collegiate desegregation compliance initiatives. Current desegregation initiatives center on changing the

60 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the experiences of three African-American women leaders in historically black institutions in one southeastern state and document how individuals committed to social justice and racial uplift connect their professional work with social and political activism in the quest for equality and justice for African Americans.
Abstract: The social movements during the last 50 years of the 20th century were among the most tumultuous years for people of color. African Americans, among other groups, confronted obstacles on what they could be and do. Negative social attitudes and the status of ethnic and racial groups were challenged and underwent change (Valverde, 2003). African Americans experienced harsh treatments in educational institutions and had to develop unconventional ways to advocate for themselves and those in their community (Jean-Marie, James, & Bynum, 2006). As the civil rights movement became a full-scale struggle, like many people of color, the African-American female leaders in this study confronted and disrupted institutions thought to be responsible for their oppression (Jean-Marie, 2005). The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of three African-American women leaders in historically black institutions in one southeastern state. This paper documents how individuals committed to social justice and racial uplift connect their professional work with social and political activism in the quest for equality and justice for African Americans--and all people. Presented are women whose elementary and secondary educational foundations were formed in segregated schools (i.e., fewer resources, lack of funding, limited teachers and classrooms). Their coming of age was inextricably linked to the larger changing consciousness of African Americans who challenged the existing social order in new ways (Ladson-Billings, 1997; Robnett, 1997). When the 1954 landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling declared that schools should be desegregated with all deliberate speed (Valverde, 2003), these African-American women were among the freedom fighters who integrated public schools, and later pursued higher education and professional careers (Jean-Marie, 2005). According to Valverde (2003), Education in general and higher education in particular became important for the individual, but especially for persons of color, who were consistently denied access to formal school early in the development of the United States and were more recently denied access to desegregated and good schools. (p. 12) The women leaders in this study come from a tradition of protest [that has been transmitted] across generations by older relatives, black educational institutions, churches, and protest organizations (Morris, 1984). Similar to these participants, many African-American professionals dedicate themselves to ensure that future generations are successfully prepared to embrace personal and societal challenges. The participants' commitment to racial uplift is related to their own experiences--born, educated, and started their educational career in a segregated America, both de jure and later de factor (Valverde, 2003). In particular, the perspectives of African-American women who were born and raised during the pre- and post-Civil Rights Movement are uniquely shaped (Loder, 2005b; Robnett, 1997) by their experiences. The Brown v. Board of Education ruling had an impact on the social lives of African-Americans who were previously denied equal access to education. Theoretical Framework The historic ruling of Brown v. Board of Education redefined what public education should be for people of color in a time where "separate but equal" dominated social institutions in the United States. The ruling was met with resistance by the dominant class who wanted to maintain the status quo. African Americans, nonetheless, persisted in their struggle to end social injustices, bigotry, and discrimination, and dismantled institutional practices and structures that hindered their advancement in society. Rather than a cry of "let us in," there were increasing calls for self-definition and self-determination among African Americans and other people of color (Gordon, 2000; Ladson-Billings, 1997). The collective mission of 'racial uplift' became the mantra that African Americans proposed as their mission. …

45 citations