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Seth D. Meyer

Bio: Seth D. Meyer is an academic researcher from University of Missouri. The author has contributed to research in topics: Agriculture & Energy policy. The author has an hindex of 19, co-authored 74 publications receiving 964 citations. Previous affiliations of Seth D. Meyer include United States Department of Agriculture & Food and Agriculture Organization.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors use economic models of US biofuel and agricultural markets and US and world petroleum and petroleum product markets to show that discontinuing biofuel tax credits and ethanol tariff lower biofuel use could lead to increased US petroleum product use, and a reduction in petroleum product consumption in other parts of the world.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the interaction of market volatility and the scope for policy to affect this interaction, with a focus on how corn yields and petroleum prices affect ethanol prices.

84 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors show that second generation biofuel impacts depend critically on whether the feedstock competes with traditional crops or is a co-product in their production, and the extent that agricultural land is allocated to dedicated biomass, food prices will increase.

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors conclude that RIN prices will be hierarchical and rollover provisions allow stock-holding, and illustrate their interpretation by constructing RIN supply and use tables, and by discussing how expiring tax credits and the specific tariff raise prices and mandate costs.
Abstract: Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs) were developed to act as tracking mechanisms that ensure compliance with the U.S. biofuel use mandates legislated in 2005 and increased and adjusted to include sub-mandates in 2007. Reviewing the rules for RIN production and use, we conclude that RIN prices will be hierarchical, and rollover provisions allow stock-holding. We illustrate our interpretation by constructing RIN supply and use tables, and by discussing how expiring tax credits and the specific tariff raise RIN prices and mandate costs. RIN markets are critical for estimating biofuel use mandate effects on biofuel and feedstock markets and welfare.

51 citations

28 Sep 2007
TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide perspective on the degree of biofuels dependence on the tax credit and tariffs, and describe the impact of discontinuing the biofuel subsidies and the ethanol import tariff on commodity markets, government costs, and farm income.
Abstract: The exponential growth of the ethanol industry has begun to draw concerns from the livestock industry as feed costs jumped nearly 30% from October 2006 to February 2007 (Warner, 2007). These concerns prompted both the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (Shinn, 2007) in February 2007, and the National Pork Producers (Warner, 2007) in March 2007 to call for non-renewal of both the excise tax credit for ethanol and the import tariff on ethanol. Other groups such as the American Petroleum Institute have argued that biofuels should compete on their own economics rather than on government subsidies (Cavaney, 2007). Biofuels already hold a prominent position in the 2007 farm bill debate. This analysis seeks to offer two contributions to the literature: 1. provide perspective on the degree of biofuels’ dependence on the tax credit and tariffs, and 2. describe the impact of discontinuing the biofuel subsidies and the ethanol import tariff on commodity markets, government costs, and farm income.

38 citations


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Posted ContentDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a re-make of the Interim Report World Agriculture: towards 2030/2050 (FAO, 2006) is presented, which includes a Chapter 4 on production factors (land, water, yields, fertilizers).
Abstract: This paper is a re-make of Chapters 1-3 of the Interim Report World Agriculture: towards 2030/2050 (FAO, 2006). In addition, this new paper includes a Chapter 4 on production factors (land, water, yields, fertilizers). Revised and more recent data have been used as basis for the new projections, as follows: (a) updated historical data from the Food Balance Sheets 1961-2007 as of June 2010; (b) undernourishment estimates from The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2010 (SOFI) and related new parameters (CVs, minimum daily energy requirements) are used in the projections; (c) new population data and projections from the UN World Population Prospects - Revision of 2008; (d) new GDP data and projections from the World Bank; (e) a new base year of 2005/2007 (the previous edition used the base year 1999/2001); (f) updated estimates of land resources from the new evaluation of the Global Agro-ecological Zones (GAEZ) study of FAO and IIASA. Estimates of land under forest and in protected areas from the GAEZ are taken into account and excluded from the estimates of land areas suitable for crop production into which agriculture could expand in the future; (g) updated estimates of existing irrigation, renewable water resources and potentials for irrigation expansion; and (h) changes in the text as required by the new historical data and projections. Like the interim report, this re-make does not include projections for the Fisheries and Forestry sectors. Calories from fish are, however, included, in the food consumption projections, along with those from other commodities (e.g. spices) not analysed individually. The projections presented reflect the magnitudes and trajectories we estimate the major food and agriculture variables may assume in the future; they are not meant to reflect how these variables may be required to evolve in the future in order to achieve some normative objective, e.g. ensure food security for all, eliminate undernourishment or reduce it to any given desired level, or avoid food overconsumption leading to obesity and related NonCommunicable Diseases.

2,991 citations

01 Jan 2015

976 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors bring together perspectives of various communities involved in the research and regulation of bioenergy deployment in the context of climate change mitigation: Land-use and energy experts, land use and integrated assessment modelers, human geographers, ecosystem researchers, climate scientists and two different strands of life-cycle assessment experts.
Abstract: Bioenergy deployment offers significant potential for climate change mitigation, but also carries considerable risks. In this review, we bring together perspectives of various communities involved in the research and regulation of bioenergy deployment in the context of climate change mitigation: Land-use and energy experts, land-use and integrated assessment modelers, human geographers, ecosystem researchers, climate scientists and two different strands of life-cycle assessment experts. We summarize technological options, outline the state-of-the-art knowledge on various climate effects, provide an update on estimates of technical resource potential and comprehensively identify sustainability effects. Cellulosic feedstocks, increased end-use efficiency, improved land carbon-stock management and residue use, and, when fully developed, BECCS appear as the most promising options, depending on development costs, implementation, learning, and risk management. Combined heat and power, efficient biomass cookstoves and small-scale power generation for rural areas can help to promote energy access and sustainable development, along with reduced emissions. We estimate the sustainable technical potential as up to 100EJ: high agreement; 100-300EJ: medium agreement; above 300EJ: low agreement. Stabilization scenarios indicate that bioenergy may supply from 10 to 245EJyr(-1) to global primary energy supply by 2050. Models indicate that, if technological and governance preconditions are met, large-scale deployment (>200EJ), together with BECCS, could help to keep global warming below 2 degrees degrees of preindustrial levels; but such high deployment of land-intensive bioenergy feedstocks could also lead to detrimental climate effects, negatively impact ecosystems, biodiversity and livelihoods. The integration of bioenergy systems into agriculture and forest landscapes can improve land and water use efficiency and help address concerns about environmental impacts. We conclude that the high variability in pathways, uncertainties in technological development and ambiguity in political decision render forecasts on deployment levels and climate effects very difficult. However, uncertainty about projections should not preclude pursuing beneficial bioenergy options.

550 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 May 2012-PLOS ONE
TL;DR: In the US, the cultivated area (hectares) and production (tonnes) of crops that require or benefit from insect pollination (directly dependent crops: apples, almonds, blueberries, cucurbits, etc.) increased from 1992, the first year in this study, through 1999 and continued near those levels through 2009; aggregate yield remained unchanged.
Abstract: In the US, the cultivated area (hectares) and production (tonnes) of crops that require or benefit from insect pollination (directly dependent crops: apples, almonds, blueberries, cucurbits, etc.) increased from 1992, the first year in this study, through 1999 and continued near those levels through 2009; aggregate yield (tonnes/hectare) remained unchanged. The value of directly dependent crops attributed to all insect pollination (2009 USD) decreased from $14.29 billion in 1996, the first year for value data in this study, to $10.69 billion in 2001, but increased thereafter, reaching $15.12 billion by 2009. The values attributed to honey bees and non-Apis pollinators followed similar patterns, reaching $11.68 billion and $3.44 billion, respectively, by 2009. The cultivated area of crops grown from seeds resulting from insect pollination (indirectly dependent crops: legume hays, carrots, onions, etc.) was stable from 1992 through 1999, but has since declined. Production of those crops also declined, albeit not as rapidly as the decline in cultivated area; this asymmetry was due to increases in aggregate yield. The value of indirectly dependent crops attributed to insect pollination declined from $15.45 billion in 1996 to $12.00 billion in 2004, but has since trended upward. The value of indirectly dependent crops attributed to honey bees and non-Apis pollinators, exclusive of alfalfa leafcutter bees, has declined since 1996 to $5.39 billion and $1.15 billion, respectively in 2009. The value of alfalfa hay attributed to alfalfa leafcutter bees ranged between $4.99 and $7.04 billion. Trend analysis demonstrates that US producers have a continued and significant need for insect pollinators and that a diminution in managed or wild pollinator populations could seriously threaten the continued production of insect pollinated crops and crops grown from seeds resulting from insect pollination.

521 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors reviewed the production, performance and emission of palm oil, Jatropha curcas and Calophyllum inophyllus biodiesel, and concluded that the main advantages of using biodiesel are its renewability and better quality of exhaust gas emissions.
Abstract: The world today is faced with serious global warming and environmental pollution. Besides, fossil fuel will become rare and faces serious shortage in the near future. This has triggered the awareness to find alternative energy as their sustainable energy sources. Biodiesel as a cleaner renewable fuel has been considered as the best substitution for diesel fuel due to it being used in any compression ignition engine without any modification. The main advantages of using biodiesel are its renewability and better quality of exhaust gas emissions. This paper reviews the production, performance and emission of palm oil, Jatropha curcas and Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel. Palm oil is one of the most efficient oil bearing crops in terms of oil yield, land utilization, efficiency and productivity. However, competition between edible oil sources as food with fuel makes edible oil not an ideal feedstock for biodiesel production. Therefore, attention is shifted to non-edible oil like Jatropha curcas and Calophyllum inophyllum. Calophyllum inophyllum oil can be transesterified and being considered as a potential biodiesel fuel. Compared to Palm oil and Jatropha biodiesel industry, biodiesel from Calophyllum inophyllum is still in a nascent state. Therefore, long term endurance research and tribological studies need to be carried out before Calophyllum inophyllum oil base biodiesel can become an alternative fuel in future.

389 citations