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Shalom Endleman

Bio: Shalom Endleman is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: French & Economic power. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 25 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors traces the history of French-English conflict in Quebec from the British conquest of New France in 1795 to the present and highlights the longlasting cultural and economic deprivation of the French resulted in a movement for change with the development ofan urban intellectual-managerial class, and a growing sense of ethnic pride.
Abstract: This paper traces the history of French-English conflict in Quebec from the British conquest of New France in 1795 to the present. The long-lasting cultural and economic deprivation ofthe French resulted in a movementfor change with the development ofan urban intellectual-managerial class, and a growing sense of ethnic pride. This is intensified by the fear that the French language and culture will be overwhelmed by the predominantly English-speaking surrounding Community. Thepeaceful transference of economic power and language dominance from the English- to the Frenchspeaking Community was facilitated by the electoral power of the French Community. Of growing concern is the greater need for English-language proficiency in the French-speaking Community as Quebec industry enters the international marketplace.

25 citations


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05 May 2005
TL;DR: In this article, the notions of micro-choices and macrochoices of language choice are discussed, including the social stratification as a factor of linguistic choice, gender speech, and communication across generations.
Abstract: 1 Introduction: notions of language Part I Micro-choices: 2 Standard and dialect: social stratification as a factor of linguistic choice 3 Gendered speech: sex as a factor of linguistic choice 4 Communicating across generations: age as a factor of linguistic choice 5 Choice and change 6 Politeness: cultural dimensions of linguistic choice Part II Macro-choices: 7 Code-switching: linguistic choices across language boundaries 8 Diglossia and bilingualism: functional restrictions on language choice 9 Language spread, shift and maintenance: how groups choose their language 10 Language and identity: individual, social, national 11 Language planning: communication demands, public choice, utility 12 Select letters: a major divide 13 The language of choice 14 Research ethics

166 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper found that when ethnic or minority groups perceive themselves to be under linguistic pressures to conform to the dominant culture and language, they will be less motivated to acculturate and will have increased resentment toward the dominant cultures.
Abstract: This study asserts that when ethnic or minority groups perceive themselves to be under linguistic pressures to conform to the dominant culture and language, they will be less motivated to acculturate to the dominant culture and will have increased resentment toward the dominant culture. A total of 567 first-, second-, and third-generation French Muslims were surveyed to ascertain the Muslim community's perception of French language policies. Aside from revealing a decreased motivation to acculturate and increased resentment toward the dominant culture, the study's results demonstrate the importance of ethnolinguistic vitality in understanding the community's overall refusal to completely adapt to the dominant French culture.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a multi-dimensional approach to policy failure is presented to identify separate aspects of failure within a single policy or program, such as failure to meet objectives, claims of negative distributional outcomes and negative electoral outcomes attributed to specific policy decisions.
Abstract: Discussions of failure in public policy have been hampered by a lack of consensus on a definition of the term ‘failure’. It can be shown that arguments relating to policy failure tend to conflate forms of failure that are actually discrete, such as failure to meet objectives, claims of negative distributional outcomes and negative electoral outcomes attributed to specific policy decisions. This article attempts to unify and clarify the discourse on policy failure by presenting a multi-dimensional approach that can identify separate aspects of failure within a single policy or program. This multi-dimensional approach to policy failure is then be applied to climate change policy in Australia, in order to demonstrate how some aspects of a policy can be interpreted as failed while others can simultaneously be interpreted as successful, even by the same observer. As this example illustrates, global pronouncements of a public policy as a ‘success’ or ‘failure’ should be avoided in favour of more precise evaluat...

36 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: The authors examined language policy and planning attempts in Nigeria since independence to the present and advocated a government's strategy of governance, which allows for greater decentralization of power and which recognizes and protects the linguistic rights of all Nigerians.
Abstract: Language policies and planning in Nigeria have hitherto not been realistically responsive to the linguistic diversity in the country. Rather, they have succeeded in accentuating ethnic consciousness and vitality with language as a symbol. For example, Nigeria is now polarized along two linguistic lines – linguistic majority and linguistic minority. Our standpoint in this paper is that a situation such as this is inimical to our emerging democracy and our aspiration for national development. The paper, therefore, will examine language policy and planning attempts in Nigeria since independence to the present. Against the backdrop of a case study of language planning in a country like Canada, with similar linguistic problems, this paper advocates a government’s strategy of governance, which allows for greater decentralization of power and which recognizes and protects the linguistic rights of all Nigerians.

28 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: PCT was demonstrated to cross successfully from a Third to a First World culture, and established potential as a method to facilitate group conflict resolution and for the promotion of pluralistic civil societies.
Abstract: The use of psychohistoriographic cultural therapy (PCT) developed in Jamaica is described in the context of two workshops in Montreal. PCT is a form of group intervention that seeks to elicit and clarify the "psychic centrality" of a group. Psychic centrality refers to a sense of psychological containment or organization of diverse individual points of view through creating a historical map of collective experience. In PCT, this collective map is constructed and techniques borrowed from creative arts therapies are used to develop a performance. This performance provides additional containment and fosters a group process that can contain collective conflicts. The performance can also be used to engage an audience, working to contain conflict while representing diverse perspectives within the group. Factors that may contribute to the effectiveness of PCT and those that may derail the process are identified through the systematic comparison of the two workshops. PCT was demonstrated to cross successfully from a Third to a First World culture, and established potential as a method to facilitate group conflict resolution and for the promotion of pluralistic civil societies.

13 citations