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Shane Phelan

Bio: Shane Phelan is an academic researcher from Colby College. The author has contributed to research in topics: Politics & Sociology. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 6 publications receiving 735 citations.

Papers
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Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the structures of strangeness: bodies, passions, and Citizenship, Citizenship and Kinship, Negotiating Strangeness, Assimilation and Visibility, Secondary Marginalization and "LGBT" Politics.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Citizens and Strangers 2. Structures of Strangeness: Bodies, Passions, and Citizenship 3. Structures of Strangeness: Citizenship and Kinship 4. Negotiating Strangeness: Assimilation and Visibility 5. Strangers among "Us": Secondary Marginalization and "LGBT" Politics 6. Queering Citizenship Notes Bibliography Index

280 citations

Book
Shane Phelan1
05 Sep 1989
TL;DR: In this article, the limits of community and the meaning of community are discussed in relation to pornography: male violence and female desire and Sadomasochism and the Meaning of Feminism.
Abstract: Acknowledgments 1. Liberalism and Its Problems 2. Lesbianism and Medical Discourse 3. The Woman-Identified Woman 4. Definition and Community 5. Pornography: Male Violence and Female Desire 6. Sadomasochism and the Meaning of Feminism 7. The Limits of Community 8. Rethinking Identity Politics Notes Bibliography Index

147 citations

Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: The Pre-History of a Lesbian and Gay Movement as mentioned in this paper, the French Revolution: Sexual Liberation and Political Speech, and the Homophile Movement: 1950-1969 IV. Gay Liberation and Lesbian Feminism V. The Gay and Lesbian Politics of AIDS VI.
Abstract: I. Pre-History of a Lesbian and Gay Movement A. Enlightenment Backgrounds B. The French Revolution: Sexual Liberation and Political Speech II. The Beginnings of a Gay and Lesbian Movement A. The Third Sex Theory and the Creation of Political Subjects B. The Emergence of a Gay and Lesbian Political Culture in Germany C. Voices of the Gay and Lesbian Diaspora: Britain and France D. From Liberalism to the New Social Relations of Soviet Socialism E. Subculture, Censorship, and Civil Rights in the United States III. The Homophile Movement: 1950-1969 IV. Gay Liberation and Lesbian Feminism V. The Gay and Lesbian Politics of AIDS VI. The Present Moment and the Future of Desire

123 citations

Book
01 Dec 1994

121 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: Phelan as mentioned in this paper argued that the self in radical lesbian feminist theory is critical and critically queer, and argued that lesbians and mestizas: appropriation and equivalence are equivalent.
Abstract: Introduction/Shane Phelan -- Critically queer/Judith Butler -- True or false: the self in radical lesbian feminist theory/Cynthia Burack -- Dichotomies and displacement: bisexuality in queer theory and politics/Stacey Young -- Lesbians and mestizas: appropriation and equivalence/Shane Phelan -- Somewhere over the rainbow: queer translating/Angelia R. Wilson -- The centering of right-wing extremism through the construction of an "inclusionary" homophobia and racism/Anna Marie Smith -- Community, rights talk, and the communitarian dissent in Bowers v. Hardwick/Gordon A. Babst -- Essentialism and the political articulation of identity/Gary Lehring -- Intimacy and equality: the question of lesbian and gay marriage/Morris B. Kaplan -- Politics, practices, publics: identity and queer rights/Paisley Currah -- Queer problems, straight solutions: the limits of a politics of "official recognition"/Lisa Bower.

70 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 2011
TL;DR: To understand the central claims of evolutionary psychology the authors require an understanding of some key concepts in evolutionary biology, cognitive psychology, philosophy of science and philosophy of mind.
Abstract: Evolutionary psychology is one of many biologically informed approaches to the study of human behavior. Along with cognitive psychologists, evolutionary psychologists propose that much, if not all, of our behavior can be explained by appeal to internal psychological mechanisms. What distinguishes evolutionary psychologists from many cognitive psychologists is the proposal that the relevant internal mechanisms are adaptations—products of natural selection—that helped our ancestors get around the world, survive and reproduce. To understand the central claims of evolutionary psychology we require an understanding of some key concepts in evolutionary biology, cognitive psychology, philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. Philosophers are interested in evolutionary psychology for a number of reasons. For philosophers of science —mostly philosophers of biology—evolutionary psychology provides a critical target. There is a broad consensus among philosophers of science that evolutionary psychology is a deeply flawed enterprise. For philosophers of mind and cognitive science evolutionary psychology has been a source of empirical hypotheses about cognitive architecture and specific components of that architecture. Philosophers of mind are also critical of evolutionary psychology but their criticisms are not as all-encompassing as those presented by philosophers of biology. Evolutionary psychology is also invoked by philosophers interested in moral psychology both as a source of empirical hypotheses and as a critical target.

4,670 citations

Book
Judith Lorber1
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: Lorber as discussed by the authors argues that gender is a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences.
Abstract: In this innovative book, a well-known feminist and sociologist-who is also the founding editor of Gender & Society-challenges our most basic assumptions about gender. Judith Lorber argues that gender is wholly a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences. Calling into question the inevitability and necessity of gender, she envisions a society structured for equality, where no gender, racial ethnic, or social class group is allowed to monopolize positions of power.

1,642 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Joshua Gamson1
TL;DR: In this paper, the meaning and distinctive politics of "queerness" are discussed, and the implications of these politics for social movement theory and research are discussed. But the focus is on the deconstruction of identity categories, rather than the creation and negotiation of collective identities.
Abstract: Drawing on debates in lesbian and gay periodicals and writings from and about post-structuralist “queer theory” and politics, this paper clarifies the meanings and distinctive politics of “queerness,” in order to trace its implications for social movement theory and research. The challenge of queer theory and politics, I argue, is primarily in its disruption of sex and gender identity boundaries and deconstruction of identity categories. The debates (over the use of the term “queer” and over bisexual and transgender inclusion) raise questions not only about the content of sexuality-based political identities, but over their viability and usefulness. This in turn challenges social movement theory to further articulate dynamics of collective identity formation and deployment. While recent social movement theory has paid attention to the creation and negotiation of collective identity, it has not paid sufficient attention to the simultaneous impulse to destabilize identities from within. That tendency, while especially visible in lesbian and gay movements, is also visible in other social movements. It calls attention to a general dilemma of identity politics: Fixed identity categories are both the basis for oppression and the basis for political power. The insights of both sides of the dilemma highlighted here raise important new questions for social movement theory and research.

704 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the tension and solidarities between gay and bisexual men by looking at the representation of a dialogue between two men in the film Together Alone, and explore these ident...
Abstract: This article considers the tensions and solidarities between gay and bisexual men by looking at the representation of a dialogue between two men in the film Together Alone. By exploring these ident...

666 citations

Book ChapterDOI
31 Dec 2002
TL;DR: The most active and creative arenas of scholarly activity in the social sciences during the past four decades have been organizational studies (OS) and social movement analysis (SM), both of which have been intellectually lively and vigorous in spite of the fact that scholars in both camps began their projects during the early 1960s on relatively barren soil.
Abstract: Introduction There is little question that two of the most active and creative arenas of scholarly activity in the social sciences during the past four decades have been organizational studies (OS) and social movement analysis (SM). Both have been intellectually lively and vigorous in spite of the fact that scholars in both camps began their projects during the early 1960s on relatively barren soil. Students of OS took up their labors alongside the remnants of scientific management, their human relations critics, and scattered studies of bureaucratic behavior. SM scholars were surrounded by earlier empirical work on rumors, panics, crowds, and mobs together with a “smorgasbord” of theoretical perspectives, including the collective behavior, mass society, and relative deprivation approaches (McAdam, McCarthy, and Zald 1988: 695). In both situations, prior work provided scant theoretical coherence and little basis for optimism. Moreover, in this early period no connection existed or, indeed, seemed possible between the two fields since the former concentrated on instrumental, organized behavior while the latter's focus was on “spontaneous, unorganized, and unstructured phenomena” (Morris 2000: 445). OS began to gain traction with the recognition of the importance of the wider environment, first material resource and technical features, then political, and, more recently, institutional and cultural forces. Open systems conceptions breathed new life into a field too long wedded to concerns of internal administrative design, leadership, and work group cohesion.

514 citations