scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Shelly Marie Crist Buchanan

Bio: Shelly Marie Crist Buchanan is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Information literacy & Personalized learning. The author has an hindex of 2, co-authored 2 publications receiving 74 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal Article
TL;DR: This paper explored the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments and highlighted the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing student-centered learning models.
Abstract: This paper explores the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments. IBL is constructivist and student-centered (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Condliffe, Visher, Bangser, Drohojowska & Saco 2016; Duffy & Raymer, 2010; Kuhlthau, Maniotes, & Caspari, 2015), leveraging student motivation and engagement through its grounding in authentic, relevant study (Deci & Ryan, 2016; SaundersStewart, Gyles, Shore & Bracewell, 2015). Recent research shows positive academic and achievement gains for students engaged in IBL work and the practice is growing. Some educators are experimenting with variations of increasingly student-driven models that privilege student choice and autonomy, such as 20% time or genius hour (Krebs & Zvi, 2015), passion-based learning (Maiers & Sandvold, 2010), and personalized learning (Bray & McClaskey, 2016). We name these more student-autonomous frameworks Student Driven Inquiry (SDI) models. The argument here is for qualitative research on the learner experience of these more recent SDI models in order to glean a more holistic understanding of the outcomes beyond grades and test scores. An examination of the recent literature on inquiry based learning, information literacy and student motivation demonstrates the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing highly student-centered learning models.

46 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This article explored the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments and highlighted the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing student-centered learning models.
Abstract: This paper explores the research literature relevant to the increasingly popular field of Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) practices in K-12 academic environments. IBL is constructivist and student-centered (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Condliffe, Visher, Bangser, Drohojowska & Saco 2016; Duffy & Raymer, 2010; Kuhlthau, Maniotes, & Caspari, 2015), leveraging student motivation and engagement through its grounding in authentic, relevant study (Deci & Ryan, 2016; SaundersStewart, Gyles, Shore & Bracewell, 2015). Recent research shows positive academic and achievement gains for students engaged in IBL work and the practice is growing. Some educators are experimenting with variations of increasingly student-driven models that privilege student choice and autonomy, such as 20% time or genius hour (Krebs & Zvi, 2015), passion-based learning (Maiers & Sandvold, 2010), and personalized learning (Bray & McClaskey, 2016). We name these more student-autonomous frameworks Student Driven Inquiry (SDI) models. The argument here is for qualitative research on the learner experience of these more recent SDI models in order to glean a more holistic understanding of the outcomes beyond grades and test scores. An examination of the recent literature on inquiry based learning, information literacy and student motivation demonstrates the need for qualitative work focused on the efficacy of a growing highly student-centered learning models.

38 citations


Cited by
More filters
01 Jan 2017
Abstract: Education Management Organizations’ Collaborative Leadership Practices for LowPerforming Urban Charter Schools by Calvin C. Cupidore Jr. MBA, Walden University, 2011 BS, Hunter College, 1973 Doctoral Study Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education Walden University October 2017 Abstract Educators have regarded building leader-member relationships using collaboration as a fundamental component to successfully improve students’ academic achievement. Ineffective collaborative leadership practices may lead to achievement deficits particularly for many urban charter schools operated by educational management organizations. The purpose of this case study was to explore collaborative leadership practices educational management organization leaders need to assist school principals in low-performing K-12 urban charter schools to improve academic achievement. Guided by Fiedler’s contingency theory, this case study explored the successful collaborative leadership practices of educational management organization leaders and school principals in a midwestern urban charter school to improve academic achievement. Data collection included semistructured interviews with 3 educational management organization leaders and 5 urban charter school principals and reviewing archival company documents. Data analysis involved coding and theming significant phrases and emerging patterns related to successful collaborative leadership practices until reaching data saturation. The emerging themes revealed included collaborative practices; academic achievement; implementation to change; school improvement; professional development; compliance and regulations; organizational culture, and community involvement. Findings from this case study resonated with Fiedler’s contingency theory and indicated the significance of collaborative leadership practices. A significant positive social change implication is that the awareness of collaborative leadership practices in low-performing K-12 urban charter schools can enhance student academic achievement.Educators have regarded building leader-member relationships using collaboration as a fundamental component to successfully improve students’ academic achievement. Ineffective collaborative leadership practices may lead to achievement deficits particularly for many urban charter schools operated by educational management organizations. The purpose of this case study was to explore collaborative leadership practices educational management organization leaders need to assist school principals in low-performing K-12 urban charter schools to improve academic achievement. Guided by Fiedler’s contingency theory, this case study explored the successful collaborative leadership practices of educational management organization leaders and school principals in a midwestern urban charter school to improve academic achievement. Data collection included semistructured interviews with 3 educational management organization leaders and 5 urban charter school principals and reviewing archival company documents. Data analysis involved coding and theming significant phrases and emerging patterns related to successful collaborative leadership practices until reaching data saturation. The emerging themes revealed included collaborative practices; academic achievement; implementation to change; school improvement; professional development; compliance and regulations; organizational culture, and community involvement. Findings from this case study resonated with Fiedler’s contingency theory and indicated the significance of collaborative leadership practices. A significant positive social change implication is that the awareness of collaborative leadership practices in low-performing K-12 urban charter schools can enhance student academic achievement. Education Management Organizations’ Collaborative Leadership Practices for LowPerforming Urban Charter Schools by Calvin C. Cupidore Jr. MBA, Walden University, 2011 BS, Hunter College, 1973 Doctoral Study Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education Walden University July 2017 Dedication I must give praise to my Lord for providing the spirituality and blessing regarding the completion of my doctoral journey. There are numerous supporters throughout my doctoral journey, who have provided support, love, and guidance. I am dedicating this milestone achievement to my late parents, Rose and Calvin Sr, who lasting love, and a nurtured educational envrionment allow me to pursue my initial higher education degree completion. Lastly, my late sister, Joyce for her everlasting love, when coupled with my parents established a strong foundation of character, pride, and perservance within me. Acknowledgments I want to give thanks to my Lord and Savior for his spirituality and his presence throughout my doctoral journey at Walden University. There are numerous family members, who have accended to our heavenly kingdom. I will recognize their collective roles for providing love and character growth. I am grateful for my departed grandparents, aunts, uncles, godparents, and departed family's friends for their collective love, critical influence in the development of my wisdom, and independence during my youth into adulthood. This acknowledgement and achievement could not be realized without the love, support, and urging of my wife and soulmate, Dr. Cherise Monet Cupidore. Furthermore, I am grateful to have the support and acceptance of my stepdaughter; Liza Strode including her expressed love. Additionally, I hope this scholarly achievement inspires my precious, granddaughters Mikaia and Kailee to aspire to greater academic achievement, during their scholastic careers. I wish to acknowledge Dr. Judith Blakely’s role at a critical juncture during my Walden University doctoral journey. I am unable to quantify the tremendous contributions as my mentor, advisor, brainstorming partner, and friend provided by Dr. Alecia Brooks. Furthermore, I wish to acknowledge Dr. Michelle Powell-Leake for her role and guidance as my immediate past committee chair. I wish to acknowledge my committee: Dr. Donna Graham (Chair) for guidance to the end of program completion, Dr. Lucian Szizewski (Second Committee) for your content reviews, and Dr. C. Jonah Eleweke (URR) for his thorough reviews during the entire process.

23 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the potential of Project Based Learning (PBL) as an instructional practice to uplift the engagement, motivation and academic achievement of low SES students in mainstr...
Abstract: The following review examines the potential of Project Based Learning (PBL) as an instructional practice to uplift the engagement, motivation and academic achievement of low SES students in mainstr...

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article investigated the positive and negative effects of computer-based scaffolding to support high-school credit recovery students' information literacy and argumentation skills in a problem-based learning unit on air quality.
Abstract: Success in problem-based learning requires both strong information literacy to search for, evaluate, and use information effectively, and argumentation skills to generate coherent arguments. This study investigated the positive and negative effects of computer-based scaffolding to support high-school credit recovery students’ information literacy and argumentation skills in a problem-based learning unit on air quality. Virtual field trips and the Connection Log were designed and developed to provide scaffolding that supported students in addressing conceptual, metacognitive, and strategic challenges. Results revealed that diverse students can use scaffolding in different ways on the basis of distinct goals and prior experiences. These findings imply that information literacy and argumentation skills supported by computer-based scaffolding are pivotal factors in problem-based learning for science education.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a case study uses grounded theory to analyze the higher education students' beliefs about learnercentered and learner-driven sustainability education, and the results indicate that the learners' beliefs are fundamentally different in terms of all of the categories.
Abstract: Learner-centered sustainability education has been advocated to be used in higher education, but the pedagogy is blurry. In the discussions, also an idea of a learner-driven approach has been promoted. The aim of this study is to study how these pedagogies have been described and suggested to be used by a group of higher education students responsible for planning a teacher education course on sustainability education. This case study uses grounded theory to analyze the higher education students’ beliefs about learner-centered and learner-driven sustainability education. The data was obtained from audio-recordings of the planning process and two semi-structured interviews of five students acting as course designers. The course designers showed to have beliefs about the nature of learner-centered/learner-driven pedagogy, freedom, meaningfulness, acting and making an influence in the learning environment, the nature and ownership of sustainable development knowledge, the diversity of the learners, and pedagogical support. The results indicate that the learner-centered and learner-driven approach are fundamentally different in terms of all of the categories. In conclusion, it is suggested that the terminology concerning learner-centered and learner-driven approaches should be more precise, and sustainability education should be developed towards a more transformative, learner-driven education.

20 citations

16 Jun 2019
TL;DR: In this paper, a hermeneutic literature review was conducted, followed by a content analysis of information literacy papers discussing content evaluation, and critical thinking papers from key authors were compared.
Abstract: Introduction. Information literacy and critical thinking are discussed as distinct concepts by authors in different disciplines. This paper seeks to analyse their conceptions to determine the extent to which they overlap, and identify areas for collaboration across disciplinary lines. Method. A hermeneutic literature review was conducted, followed by a content analysis of information literacy papers discussing content evaluation, and critical thinking papers from key authors. Analysis. Proportions of identified themes represented within the two groups of papers were compared. Similarities and differences were assessed in conjunction with findings from the hermeneutic literature review. Results. Though divergent in their basic underpinning skills, critical thinking and information literacy conceptions pertaining to content evaluation were found to be strongly overlapping in their broader conceptions. Modern pressures giving rise to content evaluation concerns such as the ‘fake news’ phenomenon suggest a need for strong sense conceptions, and an avenue for integration between information literacy and critical thinking when evaluating information. Conclusion. Taken in their strong sense, information literacy and critical thinking conceptions show a high degree of overlap. Engagement across disciplinary lines could offer an enrichment to both concepts.

16 citations