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Shen-Su Sun

Bio: Shen-Su Sun is an academic researcher from University of Adelaide. The author has contributed to research in topics: Basalt & Volcanic rock. The author has an hindex of 28, co-authored 33 publications receiving 33103 citations. Previous affiliations of Shen-Su Sun include State University of New York System & Australian National University.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors compared the relative abundances of the refractory elements in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondritic meteorites and found that the most consistent composition of the Earth's core is derived from the seismic profile and its interpretation, compared with primitive meteorites, and chemical and petrological models of peridotite-basalt melting relationships.

10,830 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Lead isotopic compositions of young volcanic rocks from different tectonic environments have distinctive characteristics their differences are evaluated within the framework of global tectonics and mantle differentiation Ocean island leads are in general more radiogenic than mid-ocean ridge basalt (morb) leads as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Lead isotopic compositions of young volcanic rocks from different tectonic environments have distinctive characteristics Their differences are evaluated within the framework of global tectonics and mantle differentiation Ocean island leads are in general more radiogenic than mid-ocean ridge basalt (morb) leads They form linear trends on lead isotopic ratio plots Many of the trends extend toward the field of morb On plots of 207 P b / 204 Pb against 206 Pb / 204 Pb, their slopes are generally close to 01 Island arc leads in general are confined between sediment and morb type leads with slopes of ca 030 on a plot of 207 P b / 204 Pb against 206 Pb / 204 Pb Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic data of Hawaiian volcanics are closely examined Data from each island support a two-component mixing model However, there is a lack of full range correlation between islands, indicating heterogeneity in the end members This mixing model could also be extended to explain data from the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge, and from 45° N on the Atlantic Ridge The observed chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in young volcanic rocks is considered to be a result of long-term as well as short-term mantle differentiation and mixing Lead isotopic data from ocean islands are interpreted in terms of mantle evolution models that involve long-term (more than 2 Ga) mantle chemical and isotopic heterogeneity Incompatible element enriched ‘plume’-type morb have Th/U ratios ca 30 too low and Rb/Sr ratios ca 004 too high to generate the observed 208 Pb and 87 Sr respectively for long periods of time Elemental fractionation in the mantle must have occurred very recently This conclusion also applies to mantle sources for ocean island alkali basalts and nephelinites Depletion of incompatible elements in morb sources is most probably due to continuous extraction of silicate melt and/or fluid phase from the low-velocity zone throughout geological time Data on Pb isotopes, Sr isotopes and trace elements on volcanic rocks from island arcs are evaluated in terms of mixing models involving three components derived from (1) sub-arc mantle wedge, (2) dehydration or partial melting of subducted ocean crust, and (3) continental crust contamination In contrast to the relation between 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and 143 Nd / 144 Nd ratios of ocean volcanics, there is a general lack of correlation between Pb and Sr isotopic ratios except that samples with very radiogenic Pb ( 206 Pb / 204 Pb > 195) have low 87 Sr/ 87 Sr ratios (07028- 07035) These samples also have inferred source Th/U ratios (30-35) not high enough to support long-term growth of 208 Pb Data suggest that their mantle sources have long-term integrated depletion in Rb, Th, U and light ree High 238 U / 204 Pb (y a)values required by the Pb isotopic data are most probably due to depletion of Pb by separation of a sulphide phase Relations between Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic ratios of young volcanic rocks could be explained by simultaneous upward migration of silicate and/or fluid phase and downward migration of a sulphide phase in a differentiating mantleration of a sulphide phase in a differentiating mantle

1,167 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the uplift history of eclogite in the Dabie Mountains can be subdivided into two stages: (1) fast uplift driven by thrust during continental-continental collision and deep subduction (at 221 Ma) of the continental crust; (2) later gentle uplift with rise of the Dabbie Mountains in the late Jurassic and Cretaceous (at 134 Ma).

987 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a strong correlation exists between percent TiO 2 (proportional to amount of melting) and Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2, CaO/TiO2 ratios of these close to primary MORB, indicating a progressive release of Al and Ca from the mantle source.

693 citations


Cited by
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01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this article, trace-element data for mid-ocean ridge basalts and ocean island basalts are used to formulate chemical systematics for oceanic basalts, interpreted in terms of partial-melting conditions, variations in residual mineralogy, involvement of subducted sediment, recycling of oceanic lithosphere and processes within the low velocity zone.
Abstract: Summary Trace-element data for mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and ocean island basalts (OIB) are used to formulate chemical systematics for oceanic basalts. The data suggest that the order of trace-element incompatibility in oceanic basalts is Cs ≈ Rb ≈ (≈ Tl) ≈ Ba(≈ W) > Th > U ≈ Nb = Ta ≈ K > La > Ce ≈ Pb > Pr (≈ Mo) ≈ Sr > P ≈ Nd (> F) > Zr = Hf ≈ Sm > Eu ≈ Sn (≈ Sb) ≈ Ti > Dy ≈ (Li) > Ho = Y > Yb. This rule works in general and suggests that the overall fractionation processes operating during magma generation and evolution are relatively simple, involving no significant change in the environment of formation for MORBs and OIBs. In detail, minor differences in element ratios correlate with the isotopic characteristics of different types of OIB components (HIMU, EM, MORB). These systematics are interpreted in terms of partial-melting conditions, variations in residual mineralogy, involvement of subducted sediment, recycling of oceanic lithosphere and processes within the low velocity zone. Niobium data indicate that the mantle sources of MORB and OIB are not exact complementary reservoirs to the continental crust. Subduction of oceanic crust or separation of refractory eclogite material from the former oceanic crust into the lower mantle appears to be required. The negative europium anomalies observed in some EM-type OIBs and the systematics of their key element ratios suggest the addition of a small amount (⩽1% or less) of subducted sediment to their mantle sources. However, a general lack of a crustal signature in OIBs indicates that sediment recycling has not been an important process in the convecting mantle, at least not in more recent times (⩽2 Ga). Upward migration of silica-undersaturated melts from the low velocity zone can generate an enriched reservoir in the continental and oceanic lithospheric mantle. We propose that the HIMU type (eg St Helena) OIB component can be generated in this way. This enriched mantle can be re-introduced into the convective mantle by thermal erosion of the continental lithosphere and by the recycling of the enriched oceanic lithosphere back into the mantle.

19,221 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors compared the relative abundances of the refractory elements in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondritic meteorites and found that the most consistent composition of the Earth's core is derived from the seismic profile and its interpretation, compared with primitive meteorites, and chemical and petrological models of peridotite-basalt melting relationships.

10,830 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the present-day composition of the continental crust, the methods employed to derive these estimates, and the implications of continental crust composition for the formation of the continents, Earth differentiation, and its geochemical inventories are discussed.
Abstract: This chapter reviews the present-day composition of the continental crust, the methods employed to derive these estimates, and the implications of the continental crust composition for the formation of the continents, Earth differentiation, and its geochemical inventories. We review the composition of the upper, middle, and lower continental crust. We then examine the bulk crust composition and the implications of this composition for crust generation and modification processes. Finally, we compare the Earth's crust with those of the other terrestrial planets in our solar system and speculate about what unique processes on Earth have given rise to this unusual crustal distribution.

7,831 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a data bank containing over 600 high quality trace element analyses of granites from known settings was used to demonstrate using ORG-normalized geochemical patterns and element-SiO2 plots that most of these granite groups exhibit distinctive trace element characteristics.
Abstract: Granites may be subdivided according to their intrusive settings into four main groups—ocean ridge granites (ORG), volcanic arc granites (VAG), within plate granites (WPG) and collision granites (COLG)—and the granites within each group may be further subdivided according to their precise settings and petrological characteristics. Using a data bank containing over 600 high quality trace element analyses of granites from known settings, it can be demonstrated using ORG-normalized geochemical patterns and element-SiO2 plots that most of these granite groups exhibit distinctive trace element characteristics. Discrimination of ORG, VAG, WPG and syn-COLG is most effective in Rb-Y-Nb and Rb-Yb-Ta space, particularly on projections of Y-Nb, Yb-Ta, Rb-(Y + Nb) and Rb—(Yb + Ta). Discrimination boundaries, though drawn empirically, can be shown by geochemical modelling to have a theoretical basis in the different petrogenetic histories of the various granite groups. Post-collision granites present the main problem of tectonic classification, since their characteristics depend on the thickness and composition of the lithosphere involved in the collision event and on the precise timing and location of magmatism. Provided they are coupled with a consideration of geological constraints, however, studies of trace element compositions in granites can clearly help in theelucidation of post-Archaean tectonic settings.

7,144 citations