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Shira Schnitzer

Bio: Shira Schnitzer is an academic researcher from University of Oxford. The author has contributed to research in topics: Judaism. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 7 citations.
Topics: Judaism

Papers
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TL;DR: This paper used Jewish sermons as a case study for understanding the established British Jewish community's response to the Boer War (1899-1902) and argued that the clergy's unflinchingly martial posture was not simply defensive or reactive.
Abstract: The period of the Boer, or South African, War (1899–1902) has generated remarkably little interest amongst scholars of Anglo-Jewish history. Historians of British anti-Semitism have found fruitful ground in the controversy of alleged Jewish culpability for the war and the amplified climate of anti-Jewish (ostensibly anti-immigrant) sentiment. But, while telling us a great deal about how some segments of the British public regarded Jews, these studies have done little to illuminate how British Jews themselves thought and behaved. This article will make a first step towards redressing these imbalances, using Jewish sermons as a case study for understanding the established community's response to the war. Though a climate of insecurity undoubtedly existed, I will argue that the clergy's unflinchingly martial posture—which was representative of elite Jewish opinion as well—was not simply defensive or reactive. The clergy also saw the war as providing an ideal opportunity to express genuine gratitude and patri...

7 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: Feldman as mentioned in this paper investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England, including the extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it.
Abstract: Book synopsis: This book presents an important new perspective on Jews in England - and English attitudes towards them - during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This was a period of fundamental change. At the accession of Queen Victoria, Jews in England were a small and disadvantaged minority, numbering no more than 30,000 and excluded from parliament. By the early twentieth century, political and legal disabilities had been almost completely abolished, the Jewish population grown tenfold, and mass immigration from eastern Europe had changed the face of Anglo-Jewry. In exploring these fundamental changes David Feldman investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England. To what extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it? How did the Jews' religious, communal and political identities develop in the English context? What was the impact of immigration, and how did the immigrants fare within the English economy? 'Englishmen and Jews' draws on a wide range of source materials in both English and Yiddish. Its chapters span political, religious, economic and social history. It deals with arguments between Whigs and Tories over Jewish emancipation and with the turbulent political life of the Jewish East End of London, with anti-semitic assaults on Disraeli and with the travails of the immigrant sweatshop workers. Above all, it reshapes our understanding of the connections between English and Jewish history during this period. By seeing each in the context provided by the other it enables us to see both in new ways, and adds strikingly to the debates on national identity and liberalism, and on class and community in pre-1914 English society. 'Ambitious and highly sophisticated ...A great achievement providing a well-researched and analytically sharp account.' Tony Kushner, History Today 'A stimulating and innovative study ...Ambitious in scope and range of concerns.' Thomas Linehan, Jewish Quarterly 'Feldman makes a heroically fair-minded effort to understand opponents of emancipation and unrestricted immigration on their own terms ...On the whole, it is a happy story that he has to tell.' John Gross, Sunday Telegraph Dr. David Feldman is a member of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, the University of London.

13 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of "uniformity" and "uncertainty" in the context of health care, and propose a solution.
Abstract: viii

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article reviewed Jewish sermons delivered by British preachers mobilizing the rhetorical resources of Jewish and general literatures to express absolute faithfulness to the United Kingdom during the First World War.
Abstract: Beginning in the eighteenth century, occasions related to war became a significant new venue for Jewish preaching. The declaration of war or its conclusion, a government‐proclaimed Day of National Fasting and Prayer or of Thanksgiving, a major victory or defeat of the nation’s armed forces – all generated sermons by Jewish preachers, who not infrequently publicized what they said beyond the synagogue walls. These sermons reflect the patriotic identification of Jews with the nation where they resided, the desire to demonstrate this loyalty to the larger society, the homiletical application of classical texts and historical precedents to new situations, the challenge presented by war to assumptions about human progress, the theological conundrum of enemy nations praying for victory to the same God, the poignant agony of Jews fighting against other Jews. This article reviews Jewish sermons delivered by British preachers mobilizing the rhetorical resources of Jewish and general literatures to express absolute...

9 citations