scispace - formally typeset

Author

Silvio Micali

Bio: Silvio Micali is an academic researcher from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Common value auction & Digital signature. The author has an hindex of 84, co-authored 236 publication(s) receiving 45550 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Silvio Micali include Polaroid Corporation & University of California.
Papers
More filters

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: This work presents a polynomial-time algorithm that, given as a input the description of a game with incomplete information and any number of players, produces a protocol for playing the game that leaks no partial information, provided the majority of the players is honest.
Abstract: We present a polynomial-time algorithm that, given as a input the description of a game with incomplete information and any number of players, produces a protocol for playing the game that leaks no partial information, provided the majority of the players is honest. Our algorithm automatically solves all the multi-party protocol problems addressed in complexity-based cryptography during the last 10 years. It actually is a completeness theorem for the class of distributed protocols with honest majority. Such completeness theorem is optimal in the sense that, if the majority of the players is not honest, some protocol problems have no efficient solution [C].

3,401 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A digital signature scheme based on the computational difficulty of integer factorization possesses the novel property of being robust against an adaptive chosen-message attack: an adversary who receives signatures for messages of his choice cannot later forge the signature of even a single additional message.
Abstract: We present a digital signature scheme based on the computational difficulty of integer factorization. The scheme possesses the novel property of being robust against an adaptive chosen-message attack: an adversary who receives signatures for messages of his choice (where each message may be chosen in a way that depends on the signatures of previously chosen messages) cannot later forge the signature of even a single additional message. This may be somewhat surprising, since in the folklore the properties of having forgery being equivalent to factoring and being invulnerable to an adaptive chosen-message attack were considered to be contradictory. More generally, we show how to construct a signature scheme with such properties based on the existence of a "claw-free" pair of permutations--a potentially weaker assumption than the intractibility of integer factorization. The new scheme is potentially practical: signing and verifying signatures are reasonably fast, and signatures are compact.

2,994 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A computational complexity theory of the “knowledge” contained in a proof is developed and examples of zero-knowledge proof systems are given for the languages of quadratic residuosity and 'quadratic nonresiduosity.
Abstract: Usually, a proof of a theorem contains more knowledge than the mere fact that the theorem is true. For instance, to prove that a graph is Hamiltonian it suffices to exhibit a Hamiltonian tour in it; however, this seems to contain more knowledge than the single bit Hamiltonian/non-Hamiltonian.In this paper a computational complexity theory of the “knowledge” contained in a proof is developed. Zero-knowledge proofs are defined as those proofs that convey no additional knowledge other than the correctness of the proposition in question. Examples of zero-knowledge proof systems are given for the languages of quadratic residuosity and 'quadratic nonresiduosity. These are the first examples of zero-knowledge proofs for languages not known to be efficiently recognizable.

2,779 citations


Proceedings Article
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or Idistributed for direct commercial advantage, the ACM copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the Association for Computing Machimery.
Abstract: Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or Idistributed for direct commercial advantage, the ACM copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the Association for Computing Machimery. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and/or specfic permission. correctly run a given Turing machine hi on these 2;‘s while keeping the maximum possible pniracy about them. That is, they want to compute Y~(~l,..., 2,) without revealing more about the Zi’s than it is already contained in the value y itself. For instance, if M computes the sum of the q’s, every single player should not be able to learn more than the sum of the inputs of the other parties. Here A4 ma.y very well be a probabilistic Turing machine. In this case, all playen want to agree on a single string y, selected with the right probability distribution, as M’s output.

2,030 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A constructive theory of randomness for functions, based on computational complexity, is developed, and a pseudorandom function generator is presented. This generator is a deterministic polynomial-time algorithm that transforms pairs (g, r), where g is any one-way function and r is a random k-bit string, to polynomial-time computable functions ƒr: {1, … , 2k} → {1, … , 2k}. These ƒr's cannot be distinguished from random functions by any probabilistic polynomial-time algorithm that asks and receives the value of a function at arguments of its choice. The result has applications in cryptography, random constructions, and complexity theory.

1,972 citations


Cited by
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

30,199 citations


Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: A valuable reference for the novice as well as for the expert who needs a wider scope of coverage within the area of cryptography, this book provides easy and rapid access of information and includes more than 200 algorithms and protocols.
Abstract: From the Publisher: A valuable reference for the novice as well as for the expert who needs a wider scope of coverage within the area of cryptography, this book provides easy and rapid access of information and includes more than 200 algorithms and protocols; more than 200 tables and figures; more than 1,000 numbered definitions, facts, examples, notes, and remarks; and over 1,250 significant references, including brief comments on each paper.

13,370 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
06 Jun 1986-JAMA
TL;DR: The editors have done a masterful job of weaving together the biologic, the behavioral, and the clinical sciences into a single tapestry in which everyone from the molecular biologist to the practicing psychiatrist can find and appreciate his or her own research.
Abstract: I have developed "tennis elbow" from lugging this book around the past four weeks, but it is worth the pain, the effort, and the aspirin. It is also worth the (relatively speaking) bargain price. Including appendixes, this book contains 894 pages of text. The entire panorama of the neural sciences is surveyed and examined, and it is comprehensive in its scope, from genomes to social behaviors. The editors explicitly state that the book is designed as "an introductory text for students of biology, behavior, and medicine," but it is hard to imagine any audience, interested in any fragment of neuroscience at any level of sophistication, that would not enjoy this book. The editors have done a masterful job of weaving together the biologic, the behavioral, and the clinical sciences into a single tapestry in which everyone from the molecular biologist to the practicing psychiatrist can find and appreciate his or

7,364 citations


Book ChapterDOI
Dan Boneh1, Matthew K. Franklin2Institutions (2)
19 Aug 2001
TL;DR: This work proposes a fully functional identity-based encryption scheme (IBE) based on the Weil pairing that has chosen ciphertext security in the random oracle model assuming an elliptic curve variant of the computational Diffie-Hellman problem.
Abstract: We propose a fully functional identity-based encryption scheme (IBE). The scheme has chosen ciphertext security in the random oracle model assuming an elliptic curve variant of the computational Diffie-Hellman problem. Our system is based on the Weil pairing. We give precise definitions for secure identity based encryption schemes and give several applications for such systems.

6,596 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that insertion of a watermark under this regime makes the watermark robust to signal processing operations and common geometric transformations provided that the original image is available and that it can be successfully registered against the transformed watermarked image.
Abstract: This paper presents a secure (tamper-resistant) algorithm for watermarking images, and a methodology for digital watermarking that may be generalized to audio, video, and multimedia data. We advocate that a watermark should be constructed as an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian random vector that is imperceptibly inserted in a spread-spectrum-like fashion into the perceptually most significant spectral components of the data. We argue that insertion of a watermark under this regime makes the watermark robust to signal processing operations (such as lossy compression, filtering, digital-analog and analog-digital conversion, requantization, etc.), and common geometric transformations (such as cropping, scaling, translation, and rotation) provided that the original image is available and that it can be successfully registered against the transformed watermarked image. In these cases, the watermark detector unambiguously identifies the owner. Further, the use of Gaussian noise, ensures strong resilience to multiple-document, or collusional, attacks. Experimental results are provided to support these claims, along with an exposition of pending open problems.

6,058 citations


Network Information
Related Authors (5)
Shafi Goldwasser

211 papers, 38.2K citations

97% related
Rafail Ostrovsky

497 papers, 30.6K citations

95% related
Oded Goldreich

511 papers, 59.5K citations

94% related
Mihir Bellare

344 papers, 52.9K citations

93% related
Phillip Rogaway

182 papers, 33.4K citations

90% related
Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 84

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20199
20182
20174
20164
20156