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Simon Biggs

Bio: Simon Biggs is an academic researcher from Edinburgh College of Art. The author has contributed to research in topics: Creativity & Dance. The author has an hindex of 5, co-authored 18 publications receiving 84 citations. Previous affiliations of Simon Biggs include University of South Australia & University of Edinburgh.

Papers
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01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors encourage contributors to enter items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses, and cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for critical writing and for the creative work.
Abstract: in English) (Text) Abstract (in original language) (Text)in original language) (Text) Language of abstract (Structured Taxonomy) Other language version (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) Pull Quotes (Text) (Multiple) References and Attachments Creative Works referenced (Node reference to Creative Work) (Multiple) We encourage contributors entering items of critical writing to indicate what creative works of electronic literature the critical writing discusses. Cross-references are then automatically displayed on both the record for the critical writing and for the creative work. Critical Writing referenced (Node reference to Critical Writing) (Multiple) critical writing comments substantively on another. Event referenced (Node reference to Event) (Multiple) Organization referenced (Node reference to Organization) (Multiple) Publisher referenced (Node reference to Publisher) (Multiple) Database or Archive referenced (Node reference to Database or Archive) (Multiple)

28 citations

01 Jan 2009
Abstract: Required a terrific electronic book? practice led research research led practice in the creative arts by , the most effective one! Wan na get it? Discover this exceptional e-book by right here now. Download and install or read online is readily available. Why we are the very best website for downloading this practice led research research led practice in the creative arts Certainly, you can select guide in numerous data kinds and also media. Try to find ppt, txt, pdf, word, rar, zip, and also kindle? Why not? Get them below, currently!

20 citations

01 Jan 2009

7 citations

30 Aug 2012
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that creativity is not valued as arising from a perceived need, a particular solution or product, nor from a supply-side "blue skies" ideal, but as an emergent property of communities.
Abstract: In its requirement for both an author and reader art can be considered a participatory activity. Expanded concepts of agency, such as in actor-network-theory (Latour 2005), question what or who can be an active participant, allowing us to revisit the debate on authorship from a new perspective. We can ask whether creativity might be regarded as a form of social interaction rather than an outcome. How might we understand creativity as interaction between people and things, as sets of discursive relations rather than outcomes? Whilst creativity is often perceived as the product of the individual artist, or creative ensemble, it can also be considered an emergent phenomenon of communities, driving change and facilitating individual or ensemble creativity. Creativity can be a performative activity released when engaged through and by a community and understood as a process of interaction. In this context the model of the solitary artist who produces artefacts which embody creativity is questioned as an ideal for achieving creative outcomes. Instead, creativity is proposed as an activity of exchange that enables (creates) people and communities. In Creative Land (Leach 2003) anthropologist James Leach describes cultural practices where the creation of new things, and the ritualised forms of exchange enacted around them, function to "create" individuals and bind them in social groups, "creating" the community they inhabit. Leach's argument is an interesting take on the concept of the gift-economy and suggests it is possible to conceive of creativity as emergent from and innate to the interactions of people. Such an understanding might then function to combat an instrumentalist view of creativity that demands of artists that their creations have social (e.g.: "economic") value. In the argument proposed here, creativity is not valued as arising from a perceived need, a particular solution or product, nor from a supply-side "blue skies" ideal, but as an emergent property of communities. This paper seeks to articulate these issues, identifying a set of core questions and describing the context within which they will be addressed, indicating how these questions will be at the centre of the pan-European ELMCIP collaborative research project. The paper examines a specific example of a creative community and outlines the research methods we intend to employ during our proposed field work. The paper concludes with an outline of our expected outcomes

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: H Hawksley and Simon Biggs as discussed by the authors explored the thematics underlying the creative thinking in the work and the technical and methodological aspects of how it is being developed and realiszed.
Abstract: This essay explores current research by the authors into dance in interactive mediated spaces. This text seeks to articulate the thematics underlying the creative thinking in the work and the technical and methodological aspects of how it is being developed and realiszed. This research develops out of previous collaborations between Sue Hawksley and Simon Biggs involving dance performance and interactive visual art, as well as other collaborations between Biggs and, variously, Sarah Rubidge, Stuart Jones and Stephen Petronio.1 The work discussed here is part of a longer term project developing a range of specific interactive real-time authoring systems for use in performance and interactive installation works.

5 citations


Cited by
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2010

944 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an eighteen-month empirical study of three interdisciplinary fields that cross the boundaries between the natural sciences or engineering, on the one hand, and the social sciences or arts on the other, is presented.
Abstract: This paper interrogates influential contemporary accounts of interdisciplinarity, in which it is portrayed as offering new ways of rendering science accountable to society and/or of forging closer relations between scientific research and innovation. The basis of the paper is an eighteen-month empirical study of three interdisciplinary fields that cross the boundaries between the natural sciences or engineering, on the one hand, and the social sciences or arts, on the other. The fields are: 1) environmental and climate change research, 2) ethnography in the IT industry and 3) art-science. In the first part of the paper, in contrast to existing accounts, we question the idea that interdisciplinarity should be understood in terms of the synthesis of two or more disciplines. We stress the forms of agonism and antagonism that often characterize relations between disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, and distinguish between three modes of interdisciplinarity. In the second part we outline three distinctive logics or rationales that guide interdisciplinary research. In addition to the logics of accountability and innovation, we identify the logic of ontology, that is, an orientation apparent in diverse interdisciplinary practices in each of our three fields towards effecting ontological transformation in the objects and relations of research. While the three logics are interdependent, they are not reducible to each other and are differently entangled in each of the fields. We point to the potential for invention in such interdisciplinary practices and, against the equation of disciplinary research with autonomy, to the possibility of forms of interdisciplinary autonomy.

436 citations

22 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used EAGER under Grant No. 1142510 to support work supported by the National Science Foundation under the name of Human Centered Computing (HC).
Abstract: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1142510, Collaborative Research: EAGER: Network for Science, Engineering, Arts and Design (NSEAD) IIS, Human Centered Computing. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2011
TL;DR: This article examines one way art-based research could look in the art classroom: an art class at Berkeley High School in Berkeley, California, and explains the tenets and pedagogy of this approach, and follows the art- based research of one student in the class.
Abstract: (2011). Art Practice as Research in the Classroom: A New Paradigm in Art Education. Art Education: Vol. 64, No. 5, pp. 12-18.

45 citations