scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Simon Read

Bio: Simon Read is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Cultural landscape & Landscape archaeology. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 4 citations.

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the work of cultural geographer John Wylie and artist Simon Read is compared with those of the artist/academic Simon Read, with the purpose of asking; how might landscapes and lives within them be considered as settled, unsettled and/or unsettling?
Abstract: This experimental article seeks to bring new approaches to landscape emerging in cultural geography into conversation with arts and humanities practice and scholarship which are focusing on matters of community, landscape and environment, and particularly vulnerable, watery landscapes. These approaches raise a whole host of questions about how changing and at-risk-landscapes are imagined, studied and lived in. In particular I (Jones) seek to bring the work of cultural geographer John Wylie into conversation with the work of the artist/academic Simon Read, with the purpose of asking; how might landscapes and lives within them be considered as settled, unsettled and/or unsettling? These notions of settling/unsettling offer purchase on various fraught questions about how we (individuals and communities) live with nature in place and landscape. Wylie’s work can be seen as an attempt to develop a practice- and performative-based post-phenomenological account of practiced landscape in which they are woven not only from presences (the dominant view), but also absences and exiles, and tensions between (fragmented) self and landscape, and more besides. Simon Read’s art practice and research seeks to map possible futures of vulnerable coastlines in relation to communities and landscape management plans. Ideas of temporal ecologies of place/landscape are opened up, which show that much of what makes a landscape what it is at any given moment is absent from the present moment and its condition. Landscape is process, and thus it is not, and cannot be seen as just in the here and now. It is a manifestation of on-going processes with the legacies of the past in place and also processes of possible futures, including the uncertainties of climate change.

4 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a series of interconnected social science and arts and humanities research projects are explored to explore how different knowledges might contribute in dialogue around flood risk; water, senses of place and community in resilience building; the power dynamics in narratives about water; and the value of conceptualising flood heritage "from below" in bringing community voices to the table.
Abstract: Severe floods on the Somerset Levels in winter 2014, and a series of other recent extreme floods across the UK, pose questions about the research needed to unravel the complex nature of flood risk and its implications for society. While much emphasis is placed on research in the natural and engineering sciences to better predict flood risk and develop solutions, this paper discusses what social science, and arts and humanities approaches can contribute to this challenging issue, alongside, and importantly integrated with, the natural sciences. Drawing upon a series of interconnected social science and arts and humanities research projects, in this paper we explore how different knowledges might contribute in dialogue around flood risk; water, senses of place and community in resilience building; the power dynamics in narratives about water; and the value of conceptualising flood heritage ‘from below’ in bringing community voices to the table. We argue that social science, and arts and humanities approaches are needed to explore creative solutions to changing or challenging flood risk. In interdisciplinary configurations in particular, they can generate much needed, creative, transformative narratives which can play key roles in the interplay and negotiation between science, policy and public understanding.

22 citations

Book ChapterDOI
22 May 2015
TL;DR: In the first book on Cultural Mapping detailing methodology developed by Evans through commissioned Cultural Planning Toolkit (Living Places) and Cultural Asset Mapping Toolkit for Culture Ministry, DCMS as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Chapter in the first book on Cultural Mapping detailing methodology developed by Evans through commissioned Cultural Planning Toolkit (Living Places) and Cultural Asset Mapping Toolkit (for Culture Ministry, DCMS). Outlines method and templates with examples using GIS-Participatory and Cultural Mapping in undertaken in various community environments and neighbourhoods as par of AHRC-funded projects (Cultural Mapping and Hydrocitizenship)

14 citations

01 Jan 2018
TL;DR: In this article, a proefschrift onderzoekt kunst-georienteerde gemeenschapsactiviteiten als potentieel middel voor het opbouwen van veerkracht.
Abstract: Het vraagstuk hoe veerkrachtig(er) te worden is tegenwoordig op zowel maatschappelijk als gemeenschapsniveau belangrijk. Dit proefschrift onderzoekt kunst-georienteerde gemeenschapsactiviteiten als potentieel middel voor het opbouwen van veerkracht. Deze focus past bij een trend van de laatste decennia waarin er toenemende aandacht is voor de waarde van kunst voor gemeenschappen, bovenop haar esthetische waarde. Daarnaast sluit het aan bij veerkrachtbeleid dat toegespitst is op de dagelijkse leefwereld en lokale kennis in gemeenschappen. Dit proefschrift is gebaseerd op een participatief onderzoeksproject uitgevoerd in het Nederlandse dorp Pingjum. De participatieve aanpak bestond uit een drietal fasen waarin creatieve en kunst-georienteerde onderzoeksmethoden zijn gebruikt: wandelinterviews, groepsgesprekken en een creatieve workshop die leidde tot een eendaagse tentoonstelling in het dorpshuis. Door vanuit verschillende perspectieven naar de rol van kunst-georienteerde gemeenschapsactiviteiten te kijken, draagt dit proefschrift bij aan het beantwoorden van de vraag hoe gemeenschappen veerkrachtiger kunnen worden.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
05 Nov 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, an art practice-based project is described as provisional and generative, involving troubled subjectivities; both could be said to operate through processes of dissemblance, instability and ambiguity that perform across and between frames.
Abstract: In this article I reflect on an art practice-based project that I have been working on in response to a particular landscape in the far west of Cornwall that was subject to a violent storm and flash flood in 2009. Landscape studies in geographical discourse have a long history of engaging with critiques of representation that focus on the power of the frame to conflate the culturally and politically constructed image of landscape with a substantive material and embodied form of knowing. Parallel developments within art discourse have shifted from a consideration of the form and essence of the art object to thinking about the troubled, uncomfortable operations of images and the generative work that art does. As such, both landscape and image could be described as provisional and generative, involving troubled subjectivities; both could be said to operate through processes of dissemblance, instability, and ambiguity that perform across and between frames. In light of such critiques, how might a visually ori...

8 citations