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Simon T. Loseby

Bio: Simon T. Loseby is an academic researcher from University of Sheffield. The author has contributed to research in topics: Antique & Urbanism. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 7 publications receiving 250 citations.
Topics: Antique, Urbanism, Empire, Urban history

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Marseille has been a focal point for Mediterranean trade throughout its long history, and its immediate landward isolation has not affected its ability to exploit the Rhone corridor and establish commercial relations with the interior of France as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Documentary and archaeological evidence concurs in placing the foundation of Marseille by colonists from Phocaea in around 600 B.C. The site can only have been chosen with an eye to its maritime commercial potential. Surrounded on the landward side by a chain of hills, the city's immediate hinterland was tiny, and only moderately fertile. Geographically, in the words of Camille Jullian, ‘Marseille … semble tourner le dos a la Provence’. But thanks to its magnificent, sheltered, deep-water harbour, now known as the Vieux-Port, the city has been a focal point for Mediterranean trade throughout its long history, and its immediate landward isolation has not affected its ability to exploit the Rhone corridor and establish commercial relations with the interior of France. Its location makes it a classic gateway community.

119 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Dec 2005
TL;DR: The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the Byzantine capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The biggest player in the sixth- and seventh-century Mediterranean economy was obviously the Byzantine Empire, which alone maintained the means and the motive routinely to encourage the bulk transportation of staple items between regions. Part of the agricultural surplus from the wealthiest of all the lands around the Mediterranean, Egypt, had long been diverted to assure supplies of grain for the imperial capital at Constantinople. The Mediterranean afforded wider opportunities for coastal producers to market their surplus, whether in dealings with the state or independently of it. The annona system may have tied shippers into the regular transport of Egyptian grain to the imperial capital, but not so tightly as to preclude them from the simultaneous pursuit of private profit. At privileged western sites like Rome and Marseilles, or Carthage and Naples, the archaeological evidence suggests that the late antique exchange-network persisted in an etiolated form through to the close of the seventh century.

83 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 2012
TL;DR: The most meaningful and revealing approach to this infinite variety lies in extended and comparative regional study, as has recently been magisterially demonstrated as discussed by the authors, and one can only try to encapsulate this general pattern of fragmentation within a unitary framework of analysis, notwithstanding the schematic superficiality that this inevitably involves.
Abstract: Any attempt at providing a synthesis of the salient characteristics and chronological development of ‘post-Roman’ economies, which will be taken here to begin from the fifth century ce , is complicated by the extent to which change varied across space and time. The most meaningful and revealing approach to this infinite variety lies in extended and comparative regional study, as has recently been magisterially demonstrated. Within the confines of an overview, however, one can only try to encapsulate this general pattern of fragmentation within a unitary framework of analysis, notwithstanding the schematic superficiality that this inevitably involves. In outline, a familiar distinction between the political destinies of the two halves of the empire, the fragmented, newly-barbarian West and the integrated and lately-flourishing East, can readily be carried over into the economic sphere because of the importance of the fiscal interests of the Roman state in shaping the dynamics of production and exchange. In neither case, however, was any radical economic transformation immediately and generally triggered by ‘the fall of Rome.’ In the East, the late antique boom encouraged by the foundation of Constantinople, and implicit in the expansion of the extent and intensity of rural settlement in several regions, continued unabated. In the West, with the notable exception of Britain, where the involution of the Roman system was complete within little more than a generation, the various successor-states entered upon a species of economic half-life, in the sense that they emitted Roman-ness in various aspects of their fiscal organization and patterns of exchange until the later seventh century, but in steadily diminishing quantities. This fading but still recognizably post-Roman pattern would be significantly complicated, but not fundamentally altered, by the absorption of Africa and parts of Italy back into the imperial orbit as a result of Justinian's reconquests. In the seventh century, however, the eastern empire underwent a military-political crisis of its own, at once more concise in its nature and less decisive in its outcomes. The Byzantine state survived, in shrunken form, and a variant of fiscal organization was maintained by the Umayads in the territories over which they had assumed control.

4 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a general reflection on late antique and early medieval urban space is offered, focusing on the long late antique phase of Mediterrranean urban history, and the enduring ideological significance of urbanism in the early medieval west.
Abstract: This paper offers a general reflection on late antique and early medieval urban space, situating the essays in the collection Le trasformazioni dello spazio urbano nell’alto medioevo (secoli V-VIII). Citta mediterranee a confronto (RM Rivista 2010, 2) within a wider framework. It focuses in particular on the long late antique phase of Mediterrranean urban history, and the enduring ideological significance of urbanism in the early medieval west.

2 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A full-scale study of the history of money, not merely of coinage, to have been written for medieval Europe can be found in this article, where a detailed picture of the many and changing roles played by money in all its forms, in all parts of Europe throughout the Middle Ages.
Abstract: This is a full-scale study of the history of money, not merely of coinage, to have been written for medieval Europe. The book is not limited to one country, or to any one period or theme, but extracts the most important elements for the historian across the broadest possible canvas. Its scope extends from the mining of precious metals on the one hand, to banking, including the use of cheques and bills of exchange, on the other. Chapters are arranged chronologically, rather than regionally or thematically, and offer a detailed picture of the many and changing roles played by money, in all its forms, in all parts of Europe throughout the Middle Ages. Thus money is seen as having differing values for differing parts of individual societies. The book shows money moving and changing as a result of war and trade and other political, economic and ecclesiastical activities without regard for national barriers or the supposed separation between 'East' and 'West'.

295 citations

BookDOI
30 Jan 2009

287 citations

DOI
01 Dec 1997
TL;DR: In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish as mentioned in this paper and Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan, who was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic.
Abstract: Greek artefacts, craftsmen and artists had penetrated Rome since regal days; from the second century BC this trickle had become a continuing and influential flood, contributing together with Italic and Etruscan architecture and art, and the developing central Italian and Roman concrete architecture, to the rich tapestry of the art of the capital. Vespasian (69-79), founder of the Flavian dynasty, showed an astute pragmatism in his handling of architecture and art. In the provinces the architectural and art forms characteristic of the Flavian era continued to flourish. Dynamism returned to imperial commissions with the Romano-Spanish Trajan. The age of Hadrian (117-38) proved to be extraordinary, largely because of the extent to which he was able to impress upon it his own many-sided personality: ruler, philhellene, architect, dilettante, poet, traveller and romantic. The rich artistic harvest of the Flavian to the Antonine ages was not just an imperial, but a corporate achievement, one which offered a worthy inheritance to following generations.

172 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the government and the people in Byzantine Ephesus were discussed, from Diocletian to Heraclius, public works and public services, Pagans, Christians and Jews.
Abstract: Preface Part I. Late Antique Ephesus: 1. From Diocletian to Heraclius 2. The government and the people 3. Public works and public services 4. Pagans, Christians and Jews 5. The material remains 6. Ephesus in Late Antiquity Part II. Byzantine Ephesus: 7. The Dark Ages 8. Medieval recovery c. 850-1304 Part III. Turkish Ephesus: 9. The emirate of Aydin: 1304-1425 10. The Ottoman period: 1425-1863 Appendices Short titles and abbreviations Bibliography Index.

153 citations