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Sonia Lippke

Bio: Sonia Lippke is an academic researcher from Jacobs University Bremen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Psychological intervention & Behavior change. The author has an hindex of 46, co-authored 212 publications receiving 7054 citations. Previous affiliations of Sonia Lippke include University of Luxembourg & Max Planck Society.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The theoretical developments and research evidence for the self-regulation framework explain the cognitive mechanisms of behavior change and adherence to treatment in the rehabilitation setting.
Abstract: Objective: The present article presents an overview of theoretical constructs and mechanisms of health behavior change that have been found useful in research on people with chronic illness and disability. A self-regulation framework (Health Action Process Approach) serves as a backdrop, making a distinction between goal setting and goal pursuit. Risk perception, outcome expectancies, and task self-efficacy are seen as predisposing factors in the goal-setting (motivational) phase, whereas planning, action control, and maintenance/recovery self-efficacy are regarded as being influential in the subsequent goal-pursuit (volitional) phase. The first phase leads to forming an intention, and the second to actual behavior change. Such a mediator model serves to explain social– cognitive processes in health behavior change. By adding a second layer, a moderator model is provided in which three stages are distinguished to segment the audience for tailored interventions. Identifying persons as preintenders, intenders, or actors offers an opportunity to match theorybased treatments to specific target groups. Numerous research and assessment examples, especially within the physical activity domain, serve to illustrate the application of the model to rehabilitation settings and health promotion for people with chronic illness or disability. Conclusions/Implications: The theoretical developments and research evidence for the self-regulation framework explain the cognitive mechanisms of behavior change and adherence to treatment in the rehabilitation setting.

515 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Self-efficacy and planning seemed to be functional as proximal predictors of health behaviors, whereas health risk perception appeared to be a negligible factor when predicting health behaviors.
Abstract: Background: Adoption and maintenance of health behaviors are often poorly predicted by behavioral intentions. To bridge the gap between intentions and behavior, strategic planning and recovery self-efficacy have been suggested as proximal predictors.Purpose: The aim was to examine the usefulness of a prediction model that includes planning and self-efficacy as postintentional mediator variables.Methods: Four longitudinal studies were conducted on dental flossing (Study I, N = 157), seat belt use (Study II, N = 298), dietary behaviors (Study III, N = 700), and physical activity (Study IV, N = 365). Dental flossing and seat belt use were assessed in students by paper-and-pencil questionnaires, whereas dietary behavior and physical activity inventories were presented to the general public in the internet.Results: By structural equation modeling, it was found that one common model fits all four data sets well. Results differed in terms of variance accounted for, but the overall patterns of estimated parameters were similar across samples.Conclusions: Self-efficacy and planning seemed to be functional as proximal predictors of health behaviors, whereas health risk perception appeared to be a negligible factor. When predicting health behaviors, self-regulatory variables should be used in addition to the behavioral intention.

350 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The delayed effect of coping planning on enactment suggests that coping planning is important for long-term maintenance.
Abstract: Young, middle-aged, and older adults in orthopaedic outpatient rehabilitation (N = 373) were randomly assigned to either an interviewer-assisted or a standard-care self-administered planning intervention. Physical activity planning consisted of specifying action plans to facilitate action initiation, and coping plans to overcome barriers. The interviewer-assisted condition led to more complete action plans and a longer duration of physical activities up to six months after discharge. Regarding coping planning, older and middle-aged adults benefited more from interviewer-assisted planning while younger adults benefited more from self-administered planning. Planning as such was found to be an effective tool for enactment irrespective of chronological age. The delayed effect of coping planning on enactment suggests that coping planning is important for long-term maintenance.

255 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although health risk perception appeared to be a negligible factor, action planning and recovery self-efficacy were effective predictors of physical exercise adherence.
Abstract: Objective: Levels of physical exercise adherence are not predicted well by behavioral intentions. Therefore, action planning and recovery self-efficacy were specified as proximal predictors to bridge the gap between intentions and adherence. The prediction model was examined in 3 studies with participants who were enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation (Study 1, N 353; Study 2, N 114) or orthopedic rehabilitation (Study 3, N 368). Main Outcome Measure: Each study included 3 measurement points in time, covering a period between 4 and 12 months. Intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and exercise levels were assessed. Results: Structural equation modeling revealed that 1 common model fit all 3 data sets well. Results differed in terms of variance accounted for, but the overall patterns of estimated parameters were similar. Conclusions: Although health risk perception appeared to be a negligible factor, action planning and recovery self-efficacy were effective predictors of physical exercise adherence.

243 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined whether the inclusion of these two planning constructs would improve the overall prediction of physical activity and examined whether intentions moderate the planning-behaviour relationship, and found that intentions moderated the effects of both types of planning on behaviour.
Abstract: Objectives. Health-behaviour change is not predicted well by behavioural intentions alone. Action planning and coping planning are two self-regulatory strategies that may help bridge the gap between intentions and behaviour. Action planning comprises the when. where and how of implementing a behaviour. Coping planning involves the anticipation of barriers and ways to overcome them. The study examines whether the inclusion of these two planning constructs would improve the overall prediction of physical activity. The main research question is which kind of planning would be beneficial for the initiation of behaviour and which one for its maintenance. Moreover. it is examined whether intentions moderate the planning-behaviour relationship. Methods. A 5-week longitudinal on-line study was conducted with 354 participants. Differences in prediction patterns between formerly active and formerly inactive individuals were compared using mUltigroup structural equation modelling. Moderating effects of intentions were tested by means of latent interactions. Results. Inclusion of the two planning factors accounted for substantially more behaviour variance than intention alone did. Coping planning mediated the intention­ behaviour relationship only in formerly active. but not in formerly inactive participants. Moreover. intentions moderated the effects of both types of planning on behaviour. Conclusions. Action planning appears to predict behaviour only when intentions are high. For actors. coping planning represents a critical self-regulation strategy to maintain their physical activity levels.

228 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Examination of prevalence of, trends in, and risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior in the United States and cross-nationally revealed significant cross-national variability in the prevalence of suicidal behavior but consistency in age of onset, transition probabilities, and key risk factors.
Abstract: Suicidal behavior is a leading cause of injury and death worldwide. Information about the epidemiology of such behavior is important for policy-making and prevention. The authors reviewed government data on suicide and suicidal behavior and conducted a systematic review of studies on the epidemiology of suicide published from 1997 to 2007. The authors' aims were to examine the prevalence of, trends in, and risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior in the United States and cross-nationally. The data revealed significant cross-national variability in the prevalence of suicidal behavior but consistency in age of onset, transition probabilities, and key risk factors. Suicide is more prevalent among men, whereas nonfatal suicidal behaviors are more prevalent among women and persons who are young, are unmarried, or have a psychiatric disorder. Despite an increase in the treatment of suicidal persons over the past decade, incidence rates of suicidal behavior have remained largely unchanged. Most epidemiologic research on suicidal behavior has focused on patterns and correlates of prevalence. The next generation of studies must examine synergistic effects among modifiable risk and protective factors. New studies must incorporate recent advances in survey methods and clinical assessment. Results should be used in ongoing efforts to decrease the significant loss of life caused by suicidal behavior.

2,147 citations

Book
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: A brief overview of the status of the Convention as at 3 August 2007 is presented and recent efforts of the United Nations and agencies to disseminate information on the Convention and the Optional Protocol are described.
Abstract: The present report is submitted in response to General Assembly resolution 61/106, by which the Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Optional Protocol thereto. As requested by the Assembly, a brief overview of the status of the Convention as at 3 August 2007 is presented. The report also contains a brief description of technical arrangements on staff and facilities made necessary for the effective performance of the functions of the Conference of States Parties and the Committee under the Convention and the Optional Protocol, and a description on the progressive implementation of standards and guidelines for the accessibility of facilities and services of the United Nations system. Recent efforts of the United Nations and agencies to disseminate information on the Convention and the Optional Protocol are also described.

2,115 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: The applied missing data analysis is universally compatible with any devices to read and is available in the digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly.
Abstract: Thank you for downloading applied missing data analysis. Maybe you have knowledge that, people have look hundreds times for their favorite readings like this applied missing data analysis, but end up in infectious downloads. Rather than enjoying a good book with a cup of tea in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some malicious bugs inside their laptop. applied missing data analysis is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our digital library hosts in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Merely said, the applied missing data analysis is universally compatible with any devices to read.

1,924 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Classifying interventions according to component techniques and theoretically derived technique combinations and conducting meta-regression enabled identification of effective components of interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating.
Abstract: Objective: Meta-analyses of behavior change (BC) interventions typically find large heterogeneity in effectiveness and small effects. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of active BC interventions designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating and investigate whether theoretically specified BC techniques improve outcome. Design: Interventions, evaluated in experimental or quasi-experimental studies, using behavioral and/or cognitive techniques to increase physical activity and healthy eating in adults, were systematically reviewed. Intervention content was reliably classified into 26 BC techniques and the effects of individual techniques, and of a theoretically derived combination of self-regulation techniques, were assessed using meta-regression. Main Outcome Measures: Valid outcomes of physical activity and healthy eating. Results: The 122 evaluations (N 44,747) produced an overall pooled effect size of 0.31 (95% confidence interval 0.26 to 0.36, I 2 69%). The technique, “self-monitoring,” explained the greatest amount of among-study heterogeneity (13%). Interventions that combined selfmonitoring with at least one other technique derived from control theory were significantly more effective than the other interventions (0.42 vs. 0.26). Conclusion: Classifying interventions according to component techniques and theoretically derived technique combinations and conducting meta-regression enabled identification of effective components of interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating.

1,877 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) as mentioned in this paper suggests a distinction between preintentional motivation processes that lead to a behavioral intention, and postintentional volition processes that leads to the actual health behavior.
Abstract: Health-compromising behaviors such as physical inactivity and poor dietary habits are difficult to change. Most social-cognitive theories assume that an individual’s intention to change is the best direct predictor of actual change. But people often do not behave in accordance with their intentions. This discrepancy between intention and behavior is due to several reasons. For example, unforeseen barriers could emerge, or people might give in to temptations. Therefore, intention needs to be supplemented by other, more proximal factors that might compromise or facilitate the translation of intentions into action. Some of these postintentional factors have been identified, such as perceived self-efficacy and strategic planning. They help to bridge the intention– behavior gap. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) suggests a distinction between (a) preintentional motivation processes that lead to a behavioral intention, and (b) postintentional volition processes that lead to the actual health behavior. In this article, seven studies are reported that examine the role of volitional mediators in the initiation and adherence to five health behaviors: physical exercise, breast self-examination, seat belt use, dietary behaviors, and dental flossing. The general aim is to examine the applicability of the HAPA and its universality by replicating it across different health behaviors, based on various measures, time spans, and samples from different countries. Les comportements nuisibles a la sante tels que le manque d’exercice physique et les mauvaises habitudes alimentaires sont difficiles a modifier. La plupart des theories socio-cognitives admettent que le meilleur predicteur d’un reel changement est l’intention que la personne a de changer. Mais la conduite est souvent en contradiction avec les intentions. La divergence entre intention et comportement est due a plusieurs raisons. Par exemple, des obstacles imprevus

1,789 citations