scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Špela Mechora

Bio: Špela Mechora is an academic researcher. The author has contributed to research in topics: Pest control. The author has an hindex of 1, co-authored 1 publications receiving 14 citations.
Topics: Pest control

Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2019
TL;DR: Accumulated selenium protects plants against aphids, weevils, cabbage loopers, cabbage root flies, beetles, caterpillars, and crickets due to both deterrence and toxicity.
Abstract: The aim of the present review is to summarize selenium’s connection to pests. Phytopharmaceuticals for pest control, which increase the pollution in the environment, are still widely used nowadays regardless of their negative characteristics. The use of trace elements, including selenium, can be an alternative method of pest control. Selenium can repel pests, reduce their growth, or cause toxic effects while having a positive effect on the growth of plants. In conclusion, accumulated selenium protects plants against aphids, weevils, cabbage loopers, cabbage root flies, beetles, caterpillars, and crickets due to both deterrence and toxicity.

28 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal of this review is to report the present knowledge of the distribution and processes of Se in soil and at the plant-soil interface, and of Se behaviour inside the plant in terms of biofortification, to unravel the Se metabolic pathways that affect the nutritional value of edible plant products, various Se bioFortification strategies in challenging environments, as well as the impact of Se-enriched food on human health.
Abstract: Selenium (Se) is an essential element for mammals and its deficiency in the diet is a global problem. Plants accumulate Se and thus represent a major source of Se to consumers. Agronomic biofortification intends to enrich crops with Se in order to secure its adequate supply by people. The goal of this review is to report the present knowledge of the distribution and processes of Se in soil and at the plant-soil interface, and of Se behaviour inside the plant in terms of biofortification. It aims to unravel the Se metabolic pathways that affect the nutritional value of edible plant products, various Se biofortification strategies in challenging environments, as well as the impact of Se-enriched food on human health. Agronomic biofortification and breeding are prevalent strategies for battling Se deficiency. Future research addresses nanosized Se biofortification, crop enrichment with multiple micronutrients, microbial-integrated agronomic biofortification, and optimization of Se biofortification in adverse conditions. Biofortified food of superior nutritional quality may be created, enriched with healthy Se-compounds, as well as several other valuable phytochemicals. Whether such a food source might be used as nutritional intervention for recently emerged coronavirus infections is a relevant question that deserves investigation.

114 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role, responses, prospects and mechanisms of trace element selenium in human nutrition are summarized in this paper, where the authors also elaborates how bio-fortification is a plausible approach to resolving Se deficiency in humans and other animals.
Abstract: The trace element selenium (Se) is a crucial element for many living organisms, including soil microorganisms, plants and animals, including humans Generally, in Nature Se is taken up in the living cells of microorganisms, plants, animals and humans in several inorganic forms such as selenate, selenite, elemental Se and selenide These forms are converted to organic forms by biological process, mostly as the two selenoamino acids selenocysteine (SeCys) and selenomethionine (SeMet) The biological systems of plants, animals and humans can fix these amino acids into Se-containing proteins by a modest replacement of methionine with SeMet While the form SeCys is usually present in the active site of enzymes, which is essential for catalytic activity Within human cells, organic forms of Se are significant for the accurate functioning of the immune and reproductive systems, the thyroid and the brain, and to enzyme activity within cells Humans ingest Se through plant and animal foods rich in the element The concentration of Se in foodstuffs depends on the presence of available forms of Se in soils and its uptake and accumulation by plants and herbivorous animals Therefore, improving the availability of Se to plants is, therefore, a potential pathway to overcoming human Se deficiencies Among these prospective pathways, the Se-biofortification of plants has already been established as a pioneering approach for producing Se-enriched agricultural products To achieve this desirable aim of Se-biofortification, molecular breeding and genetic engineering in combination with novel agronomic and edaphic management approaches should be combined This current review summarizes the roles, responses, prospects and mechanisms of Se in human nutrition It also elaborates how biofortification is a plausible approach to resolving Se-deficiency in humans and other animals

82 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the effect of nanoselenium (nano-Se) on the resistance of wheat to S. avenae was investigated. And the results revealed that the combination of nano-Se and melatonin could achieve the best overall performance by reducing the S. vindae number by 52.2%.
Abstract: The mechanism of nanoselenium (nano-Se) improving the resistance induced by plant components to aphids is unclear. In this study, foliar sprayed nano-Se (5.0 mg/L) could significantly reduce the Sitobion avenae number (36%) compared with that in the control. Foliar application of nano-Se enhanced the antioxidant capacity by reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing GSH-Px, CAT, GSH, Pro, and VE concentrations in wheat seedlings. The phenylpropane pathway was activated by nano-Se biofortification, which increased apigenin and caffeic acid concentrations. The high-level expression of the related genes (TaBx1A, TaBx3A, TaBx4A, TaASMT2, and TaCOMT) induced the promotion of melatonin (88.6%) and 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA) (64.3%). Different ratios of the secondary metabolites to nano-Se were taken to examine the effects on resistance of wheat to S. avenae. The results revealed that the combination of nano-Se and melatonin could achieve the best overall performance by reducing the S. avenae number by 52.2%. The study suggests that the coordinated applications of nano-Se and melatonin could more effectively improve the wheat resistance to aphids via the promotion of volatile organic compound synthesis and modulation in phenylpropane and indole metabolism pathways.

16 citations