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Stefan Hausberger

Bio: Stefan Hausberger is an academic researcher from University of Graz. The author has contributed to research in topics: Fuel efficiency & Traffic flow. The author has an hindex of 8, co-authored 39 publications receiving 212 citations.

Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 Nov 2010
TL;DR: A toolbox, which links the microscopic traffic flow simulator VISSIM with the instantaneous emission model PHEM (Passenger car and Heavy-duty Emission Model) to provide improved assessments of the environmental impact of traffic networks, management strategies and technology implementations.
Abstract: Microscopic traffic simulation models coupled with instantaneous emission models have the potential to provide improved assessments of the environmental impact of traffic networks, management strategies and technology implementations. This paper describes a toolbox, which links the microscopic traffic flow simulator VISSIM with the instantaneous emission model PHEM (Passenger car and Heavy-duty Emission Model).

47 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An approach is developed based on vehicle specific power that uses commonly measured or easily obtainable vehicle information such as vehicle speed, acceleration and mass that is appropriate for application to larger vehicle emission remote sensing databases, thus extending real-world distance-based vehicle emissions information.

29 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A model is developed that isBased on physical reasoning, i.e., it is based on energy balances, shows reliable prediction for any combination of the driving pattern, the ambient temperature, the stop time before the ride and the duration of the ride, if shorter than the warm-up phase.

26 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
04 Aug 2011
TL;DR: This paper presents an intermediate calculation step to make a first estimation of the environmental impacts to avoid unessential detailed investigations and provides the possibility to decide whether the simulated traffic control strategy has a positive effect on emissions.
Abstract: Road traffic plays an important role in exhaust gas emissions. Traffic related emissions can be reduced by different traffic control measures like traffic signals in urban areas and Variable Message Signs on motorways. The control strategies aim to harmonize traffic flow and adjust unavoidable congestion in order to minimize fuel consumption and emissions. Since the engine technology of cars is currently changing rapidly (automatic start-stop, increasing fleet of hybrid vehicles and emerging electrical vehicles) fleet emissions are not as predictable as in the past. In order to test the impact of traffic control strategies on traffic related emissions, a research team at the Technical University in Graz developed a simulation toolbox by coupling a microscopic traffic flow simulator (VISSIM) and a microscopic emission model (PHEM). This toolbox allows to simulate different traffic scenarios for urban and interurban road networks and to calculate the related fuel consumption and emissions. Due to the vast amount of data and the complexity of instantaneous emission calculation based on engine maps, modeling of large-scale road networks is computationally very intensive which limits the number of different traffic control scenarios. This paper presents an intermediate calculation step to make a first estimation of the environmental impacts to avoid unessential detailed investigations. This step provides the possibility to decide whether the simulated traffic control strategy has a positive effect on emissions. Based on this decision support modelers are able to identify suitable control strategies for further investigations. The simplified calculation method is based on averaging a vast amount of vehicle trajectory data. Representative trajectories are taken as classifiers for emission calculation to limit this most time consuming step.

19 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of the techniques used to measure road vehicle emissions are examined in relation to the development of emission factors found in emission models used to produce emission inventories.

433 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Air quality and health benefits of 14 specific emission control measures targeting BC and methane would have substantial co-benefits for air quality and public health worldwide, potentially reversing trends of increasing air pollution concentrations and mortality in Africa and South, West, and Central Asia.
Abstract: Background: Tropospheric ozone and black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5), are associated with premature mortality and they disrupt g...

362 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an overview of past, present and future emissions from land transport, of their impacts on the atmospheric composition and air quality, on human health and climate change and on options for mitigation.

315 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Switching from PFI to GDI vehicles will likely lead to a reduction in net global warming, and cold-start contributes a larger fraction of the total unified cycle emissions for vehicles meeting more-stringent emission standards.
Abstract: Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards have led to widespread adoption of vehicles equipped with gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines. Changes in engine technologies can alter emissions. To quantify these effects, we measured gas- and particle-phase emissions from 82 light-duty gasoline vehicles recruited from the California in-use fleet tested on a chassis dynamometer using the cold-start unified cycle. The fleet included 15 GDI vehicles, including 8 GDIs certified to the most-stringent emissions standard, superultra-low-emission vehicles (SULEV). We quantified the effects of engine technology, emission certification standards, and cold-start on emissions. For vehicles certified to the same emissions standard, there is no statistical difference of regulated gas-phase pollutant emissions between PFIs and GDIs. However, GDIs had, on average, a factor of 2 higher particulate matter (PM) mass emissions than PFIs due to higher elemental carbon (EC) emissions. SULEV certified GDIs ...

173 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a review of literature concerning road traffic data and its use by local government authorities in emissions models (EMs) is presented, focusing on the practicalities of using data readily available to LGAs to estimate network level emissions and inform effective policy.
Abstract: Tailpipe emissions from vehicles on urban road networks have damaging impacts, with the problem exacerbated by the common occurrence of congestion. This article focuses on carbon dioxide because it is the largest constituent of road traffic greenhouse gas emissions. Local Government Authorities (LGAs) are typically responsible for facilitating mitigation of these emissions, and critical to this task is the ability to assess the impact of transport interventions on road traffic emissions for a whole network. This article presents a contemporary review of literature concerning road traffic data and its use by LGAs in emissions models (EMs). Emphasis on the practicalities of using data readily available to LGAs to estimate network level emissions and inform effective policy is a relatively new research area, and this article summarises achievements so far. Results of the literature review indicate that readily available data are aggregated at traffic level rather than disaggregated at individual vehicle level. Hence, a hypothesis is put forward that optimal EM complexity is one using traffic variables as inputs, allowing LGAs to capture the influence of congestion whilst avoiding the complexity of detailed EMs that estimate emissions at vehicle level. Existing methodologies for estimating network emissions based on traffic variables typically have limitations. Conclusions are that LGAs do not necessarily have the right options, and that more research in this domain is required, both to quantify accuracy and to further develop EMs that explicitly include congestion, whilst remaining within LGA resource constraints.

126 citations